David Horvitz always

Speaking of the end of western civ, Scotch Broom is blooming all over CA right now, too. It smells great!!! It is also super invasive and hated by many purists. But....... in the right place I love it. Try along the more barren verges on your local fwy. Cheers. Photo by David Kratville, CA Dept. of Food and Agriculture. I grabbed Horvitz' below image of Scotch Broom from Wikipedia link.

Speaking of the end of western civ, Scotch Broom is blooming all over CA right now, too. It smells great!!! It is also super invasive and hated by many purists. But....... in the right place I love it. Try along the more barren verges on your local fwy. Cheers. Photo by David Kratville, CA Dept. of Food and Agriculture. I grabbed Horvitz' below image of Scotch Broom from Wikipedia link.

I got the below missive from said Mr. Horvitz this evening. Do with this information what you will – keep in mind that knowledge such as this, should it fall into the wrong hands, could mean the end of Western Civilization as we know it.

And where the hell would we be without Western Civ?

Cut and pasted from gmail:

David Horvitz to me

sent this to your old email.

- d

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: David Horvitz <hikarusaru@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, Jun 9, 2011 at 1:14 AM
Subject: by word of mouth only: opening outfit #2 (ARLES, FRANCE)
To: hikarusaru@gmail.com

Hi All -

I hope you are all well. I am writing from New York. It is getting very hot. I just got back from doing a project in Vancouver (here is a piece from Vancouver, look very closely at the photograph: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytisus_scoparius).

The five of you who I am emailing have purchased the New Museum opening outfit edition from last Autumn. I have decided to make this an ongoing series. If you don’t already know, I have been nominated by Chris Boot of Aperture for the prize at the Arles photo festival this July in Arles, France. There are 15 people total nominated, mostly people with a strict Photography practice. (The festival’s site is here: http://www.rencontres-arles.com ). I have decided to do my next outfit work for for this exhibition. Unlike the New Museum opening, this opening will be over the course of a week, in the beginning of July. There will be many parties, events, dinners, etc…

For the original piece, I only told Christian Schwarm about the piece. Every one of you found out about the piece through him in some way.

For this edition, I am telling the five of you about this (and only you). You all have the power to further distribute information about this work, or not… You five are the potential outlets in which this information must pass through to get out into the world.

The details of this work are:

- all money made from sales will be used towards purchasing my outfit for the events in Arles, France in July
- you will receive documentation of the purchases in the form of photocopied receipts, photographs, and other materials
- you will receive photographic prints of the “performance” (the wearing of the outfit at the opening)
- throughout the Festival, you will receive photograph snap-shots via e-mail
- you will receive copies of any press related material that I find myself in (blog posts, articles, etc…)
- you will receive a signed + numbered statement

- the price of the edition is $100 USD
- it will be sold until the beginning of July (I will delete the site when this time is up)
- the amount of people who purchase the piece defines the edition size (if 2 people buy it, it is an edition of 2, and the outfit is quite simple. if 30 people buy it, it is an edition of 30, and the outfit is more extravagant).

This is a new part of the project:

All information regarding this piece must come from you (whether you forward this email with my text, re-post it, re-write it, etc…).  The web-site that contains the Paypal button contains no text at all. Information must circulate by a kind of “word of mouth.”

Here is the site:

http://davidhorvitz.com/arles.html

NOTE: THIS IS NOT TO PRESSURE ANY OF YOU TO PURCHASE THIS PIECE, OR PARTICIPATE. IF YOU ARE NOT INTERESTED IN THIS, THAT IS completely fine. I am a little concerned that you may feel obligated to purchase this because I am only emailing a small amount of people. If you are not interested, don’t worry!

:-)

Thank You,

- David Horvitz

P.S. Are you familiar with Van Gogh’s postmaster paintings?  See the attached image. The postmaster is from Arles. How wonderful!

AND FOR GOOD MEASURE I’M THROWING IN TWO THREE RECENT VIDEO EXTRAVAGANZAS BY YOURS TRULY. ENJOY. (Please.)

Caspar David Friedrich driving along a mountain road

Carnivores at play

Mad piano on the blasted heath

Come on, watch them – none is more than a minute!!! And all are more fun than is necessary. ;~]

XXXOOO

Geoff

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

a few new places for images

Eadweard Muybridge, ANIMAL LOCOMOTION, 1887. From the website of Laurence Shafe, which is here-in linked.

Eadweard Muybridge, ANIMAL LOCOMOTION, 1887. From the website of Laurence Shafe, which is here-in linked.

Piet Mondrian, WINDMILL IN SUNLIGHT, 1905, also from Shafe. Again linked.

Piet Mondrian, WINDMILL IN SUNLIGHT, 1905, also from Shafe. Again linked.

Another Mondrian, THE GREY TREE, 1912. Shafe.

Another Mondrian, THE GREY TREE, 1912. Shafe.

Charline von Heyl, DUSTY DAFNI, Acrylic on linen 82 x 72 inches  Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen. This painting is currently on view at 1301 PE, link to same.

Charline von Heyl, DUSTY DAFNI, Acrylic on linen 82 x 72 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen. This painting is currently on view at 1301 PE, link to same.

Marsden Hartley, LANDSCAPE, NEW MEXICO, 1923, oil on canvas. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn

Marsden Hartley, LANDSCAPE, NEW MEXICO, 1923, oil on canvas. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn

, 1904 albumen silver print. Image from and link to Amon Carter Museum.”]Thomas W. Smillie, W.L. SNOW [PROFILE IN NAVY UNIFORM], 1904 albumen silver print. Image from and link to Amon Carter Museum.

Thomas W. Smillie, W.L. SNOW [PROFILE IN NAVY UNIFORM

Will Barnet (1911- ); Self-Portrait; 1948-1949; Oil on canvas; Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; 1999.5

Will Barnet (1911- ); Self-Portrait; 1948-1949; Oil on canvas; Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; 1999.5

John McLaughlin, Untitled, ca. 1946-1949 Oil and tempera on composition board 20 in. x 24 in. (50.8 cm x 60.96 cm) Crocker Art Museum, anonymous gift

John McLaughlin, Untitled, ca. 1946-1949 Oil and tempera on composition board 20 in. x 24 in. (50.8 cm x 60.96 cm) Crocker Art Museum, anonymous gift

Jess (American, 1923-2004) Feignting Spell, 1954 Oil on canvas 48 in. x 42 in. (121.92 cm x 106.68 cm) Crocker Art Museum, partial gift of the Jess Collins Trust with contributions from the George and Bea Gibson Fund, Marcy and Mort Friedman Acquisition Fund, Rose Huckins Memorial Fund, and the Michael Himovitz Fund. Link to Crocker Museum

Jess (American, 1923-2004) Feignting Spell, 1954 Oil on canvas 48 in. x 42 in. (121.92 cm x 106.68 cm) Crocker Art Museum, partial gift of the Jess Collins Trust with contributions from the George and Bea Gibson Fund, Marcy and Mort Friedman Acquisition Fund, Rose Huckins Memorial Fund, and the Michael Himovitz Fund. Link to Crocker Museum

Roy De Forest (American, 1930-2007) Recollections of a Sword Swallower, 1968 Polymer and glitter on canvas 62 1/4 in. x 62 1/2 in. (158.12 cm x 158.75 cm) Crocker Art Museum Purchase with funds from the Maude T. Pook Acquisition Fund

Roy De Forest (American, 1930-2007) Recollections of a Sword Swallower, 1968 Polymer and glitter on canvas 62 1/4 in. x 62 1/2 in. (158.12 cm x 158.75 cm) Crocker Art Museum Purchase with funds from the Maude T. Pook Acquisition Fund

Sam Richardson, That’s a Small Island with Snow and Frozen Water, circa 1970-75 Acrylic and Plexiglas Collection of the San Jose Museum of Art Gift of the artist and Adrienne Richardson from Mediachef Flickr stream.

Sam Richardson, That’s a Small Island with Snow and Frozen Water, circa 1970-75 Acrylic and Plexiglas Collection of the San Jose Museum of Art Gift of the artist and Adrienne Richardson from Mediachef Flickr stream.

Sam Richardson (American, b. 1934) There's an Extended Cloud over that Mountain cast polyfoam fiberglass 19½ x 42½ x 24½ in. (49.6 x 108 x 62.2 cm.), including base. Executed in 1969. Image from a pretty great 2010 Christie's Auction, link.

Sam Richardson (American, b. 1934) There's an Extended Cloud over that Mountain cast polyfoam fiberglass 19½ x 42½ x 24½ in. (49.6 x 108 x 62.2 cm.), including base. Executed in 1969. Image from a pretty great 2010 Christie's Auction, link.

About the above Charline von Heyl painting, Dusty Dafni. In her Hammer/UCLA talk von Heyl mentioned that painting and its relation to her stay at Marfa – it seems while she was there much of Texas was burning. The image of a tree blowing in the wind outside her residence window stuck with her and leaked out while she painted this painting. She was surprised to find such clear representation within her practice. It is interesting to me that another abstract-ish painter that I know, during a recent Marfa residency also began to paint from his surroundings. A body of work that this painter developed while at the residency had direct connection to the buildings on the site and the details of the architecture. Is there something about Marfa, basically a center for late abstract or at least Non-objective art, that inspires current abstract artists of note to find new directions? Hmm.

Along that train of thought, I offer you several links: Charline von Heyl at the Hammer UCLA Department of Art Lectures, Steve Roden on Proximities and Site Dependent work.

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Wanderings | Leave a comment

Redneck Burgundy and Zoot Sims – On the Road Again

Few, my friends, are the things more enjoyable than piling into the car and driving along back roads. Do you know what? Back roadedness isn’t even necessary – have you looked around while you drive through The Grapevine? Absolutely beautiful the 5 is, and it’s one of the most traveled hwys in California. Stay with me through the end of this two post picture extravaganza and I’ll wrap up with a choreographed trip south through The Grapevine. Your heroes (me and sweetness) in our chariot (a a dusty 2008 Audi) roaring through the pass to the tunes of Kurt Weill leider sung by Ute Lemper and “Murder Squaredance on the Spiral Jetty,” a collaboration btwn Stephanie Taylor and Vanessa Place. “Hah!” he said as he whipped those three hundred horses, “Stick with me baby – I’ve got things to show you that you’ve never even imagined!”

We begin rather more timidly, on Hwy 46 crossing the middle of the state leaving the oil and almond fields of the Central Valley for cattle country. I play quietly in the passenger seat.

Food btwn my feet, open country around us, Bill Evans Trio on the sound system. Yay.

Food btwn my feet, open country around us, Bill Evans Trio on the sound system. Yay.

When I worked in retail, they taught me that display is everything. A friend added the corollary: "Easy access always!"

When I worked in retail, they taught me that display is everything. A friend added the corollary: "Easy access always!"

Bakersfield's premiere cru with which to wet our whistle. Wowee, dashboard-ready.

Bakersfield's premiere cru with which to wet our whistle. Wowee, dashboard-ready.

As often happens, I make friends with a little scrap. We occupy each other for a while. I think of this as minimalist repetition by other means.

As often happens, I make friends with a little scrap. We occupy each other for a while. I think of this as minimalist repetition by other means.

Eek, a dramatic shift. What?!

Eek, a dramatic shift. What?!

The little fucker jumped!

The little fucker jumped!

Shifting in space...

Shifting in space...

mugging with the windshield wiper

mugging with the windshield wiper

Waving at truckers...

Waving at truckers...

Supine. (Sue who?)

Supine. (Sue who?)

Ooh. Lucky and neat.

Ooh. Lucky and neat.

Okay, red vine licorice time for all good children. Then I gotta go for a while, be back tonight with updates on the weekend and next week.

Enjoy you day. Eat your fruits and vegetables.

The future: banishment of claustrophobic repetition - in the out of doors - on and beyond the road. Link in this image to a video of Zoot Sims and Al Cohn music and a film of the Carizzo Plain. The storm gathers...

The future: banishment of claustrophobic repetition - in the out of doors - on and beyond the road. Link in this image to a video of Zoot Sims and Al Cohn music and a film of the Carizzo Plain. The storm gathers...

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Wanderings | 1 Comment

Jennifer Rochlin for Home Show, Revisited

Jennifer Rochlin sculpture, Home Show, Revisited - oblique view showing literal (and hinting at phenomenal) transparency.

Jennifer Rochlin sculpture, Home Show, Revisited - oblique view showing literal (and hinting at phenomenal) transparency.

Jennifer Rochlin sculpture, Home Show, Revisited - a view from above.

Jennifer Rochlin sculpture, Home Show, Revisited - a view from above.

I visited Jennifer Rochlin’s studio several weeks ago to find out about her plans for the Home Show, Revisited at the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum. As you should be aware, the show opened on May 21 to much acclaim. (Yay artists and curators!!! Many cheers!)

So I’ve got some catching up to do.

In the studio was a large metal framework structure and many ceramic plaques. This framework was four open planes, each stepped back from the other, and hanging from the top member (the lintel if these were doors) were yellow shaped panels, sort of like cartoony alphabet symbols. Onto these panels Rochlin intended to fix her ceramic paintings, or tiles.

Large scale stand alone sculpture is new for Rochlin, previously she has exhibited wall pieces – both large scale mural style and discrete ‘painting’ size. Often these make use of the wall as a surface for the art, marking out a space with paint and applying clay tiles and painted or printed fabric.

Jennifer Rochlin, "The Wave", 2010, 3.5' x 16', stoneware and earthenware tiles, underglaze ,glaze, spray paint, nails, paint on wall

Jennifer Rochlin, "The Wave", 2010, 3.5' x 16', stoneware and earthenware tiles, underglaze ,glaze, spray paint, nails, paint on wall

Jennifer Rochlin, "Tour de Lance", 2006,  6' x 4.5', oil on paper mounted on canvas

Jennifer Rochlin, "Tour de Lance", 2006, 6' x 4.5', oil on paper mounted on canvas

Jennifer Rochlin, "Untitled", yellow grouping, 2009, 4' x 4', stoneware and earthenware tiles, underglaze and glaze, nails, paint on wall

Jennifer Rochlin, "Untitled", yellow grouping, 2009, 4' x 4', stoneware and earthenware tiles, underglaze and glaze, nails, paint on wall

Jennifer Rochlin, "Untitled", red grouping, 2011, 2.75' x 5', stoneware and earthenware tiles, underglaze and glaze, fabric, wood,  nails, paint on wall

Jennifer Rochlin, "Untitled", red grouping, 2011, 2.75' x 5', stoneware and earthenware tiles, underglaze and glaze, fabric, wood, nails, paint on wall

Jennifer talked about the challenge of making something that must support itself – it occurred to me (why for the first time I wonder?) that a good part of sculpture is structural engineering, and this fact of structure, while being a challenge, must also open doors to new thinking on the part of an artist.

Later, at the opening reception, Jennifer Rochlin and I discussed this fact, she shared that “originally I (Rochlin) thought I would use many more of my tiles on the piece.” As she installed the sculpture and put the tiles on, the installation became worse and worse looking (my paraphrase NOT Jennifer’s words at all) so finally she edited until the balance she sought was present in the work. She remarked noticing that having the structure visible as lines and planes in space, and accounting for the fact that the object occupied three dimensions offered sufficient complication and so applying the additional detail of many more colored tiles – which might work on a flat wall piece – only fussed the sculpture up too much.

Jennifer Rochlin, sculpture for Home Show, Revisited

Jennifer Rochlin, sculpture for Home Show, Revisited

An interesting thing occurred while we were walking around Rochlin’s sculpture on its Montecito mansion lawn – a breeze came up and caused the tiles to clank delicately against their wooden panels. This was a very gentle way to be reminded of the physical nature of the work – one moment the sound (a rather deep in tone sound) came from six feet behind me and eight feet to my left, then the tiles right in front of me sounded, and then all were silent. The metal framework outlined in space transparent planes, sliding over one another and intersecting. The wooden panels and clay tiles, while slight in profile, suggested to me mass – by their flat, opaque surface areas, and also bulk – by the subtle, resounding clanking in the breeze.

Visually the work has a sort of Bam-Bam Modernism, perhaps like Picasso if he watched the Flintstones and the Jetsons, hmm, while holding hands with Matisse. This phrasing of course is my glib self coming out – a little bit to the point but entirely missing the sense of personal story-telling I picked up from the tiles: they resemble small portraits, flowers, prehistoric-looking drawings, all on tiles that might be chevron shaped, or round, or bumpy organic – some are shaped like fish and some like faces. I do not suppose these add up to a classic narrative but maybe they do become an older style of narration: small meaningful moments in clay, signifying one’s passage through life by representing the myriad – and separately insignificant – objects one touches, faces one sees and thoughts that spring to mind.

Jennifer Rochlin, sculpture for Home Show, Revisited - hoovered from her Facebook page.

Jennifer Rochlin, sculpture for Home Show, Revisited - hoovered from her Facebook page.

Jennifer Rochlin, detail of the above

Jennifer Rochlin, detail of the above

Another photo taken by Jennifer Rochlin

Another photo taken by Jennifer Rochlin

I attempted three times in thirty second videos to capture the sound I mention above. Little was my success, though the videos do make nice detail shots of Jennifer’s sculpture. So if you’d like to see more, check them out:

Video One

Video Two

Video Three

Thanks much, talk with you again soon,

Geoff

The more of CAF “Home Show, Revisited:

CAF Part 1: Michele O’Marah – Video Portraits

CAF Part 2: Conversation with curator Miki Garcia

CAF Part 3: The Home Show in general – 1988, 1996

CAF Part 4: Florian Morlat – A Monument for the Dovers

CAF Part 5: Bettina Hubby for Home Show, Revisited

CAF Part 6: Jennifer West at Andy Perry’s house

CAF Part 7: Jennifer Rochlin for Home Show, Revisited

CAF Part 8: Evan Holloway: Art History = Successful Products + Time (a smorgasbord)

CAF Part 9: “Home Show” again

CAF Part 10: “One More Time For Home Show 1988

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Reviews | Leave a comment

tag cloud-duchamp-rheinhardt

Ad Rheinhardt, "Abstraction" 1944, Philadelphia Museum of Art (brings Will Fowler's paintings to mind)

Ad Rheinhardt, "Abstraction" 1944, Philadelphia Museum of Art (brings Will Fowler's paintings to mind)

Hi friends, a new feature has entered Notes-land. Some of you will recognize the above group of words as a “tag cloud,” a non-hierarchical taxonomy. The words or tags in the grouping are terms for geographic location, subject matter, medium used, etc. When you click on one, all the Notes on Looking posts with related content will line up like little lambs – waiting for you to pet them and consider them or slaughter and eat them, as you will.

I’ve done this, of course, in an effort to get you to spend more time with my writing, to leave the home page and go deeper, as it were. Why? Well, like any creative person the more time I can get you to pay attention to my work……. the better for me. Do you think a painter is thrilled when you tell her or him that you “…spent an hour in the gallery looking at (their) painting” rather than “Yeah, I ran in and checked your stuff out for a sec, looks great dude.” Which would you prefer??????

Same-o diff-o here.

You’ll discern that my categories are pretty much all over the place. I began with descriptors like “painting” and “sculpture” and “interviews” – dull stuff like that. These quickly morphed into “it started @ lascaux” and “objects in space” and “talky-talk” and more that you’ll discover. I fully expect that these titles will change again over time, and possibly often. Nothing bores me like stasis.

So have fun, read Notes on Looking, let me know if you have suggestions. We’ll both learn things.

Geoff

Marcel Duchamp, "Sonata" 1911, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Marcel Duchamp, "Sonata" 1911, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Daydreaming…. among other things, we visited Akron

Coming upon the Coop Himmelb(l)au-architected Akron Art Museum from behind on S. Broadway, viewing the loading dock under the trees.

Coming upon the Coop Himmelb(l)au-architected Akron Art Museum from behind on S. Broadway, viewing the loading dock under the trees.

A truck and an overhang. Nice cladding on the bldg, an interesting triangular goiter sticking out and also reflected, high quality fencing. Pretty cool so far.

A truck and an overhang. Nice cladding on the bldg, an interesting triangular goiter sticking out and also reflected, high quality fencing. Pretty cool so far.

Post-it or tab style ground signage rather than monument style. Very internet feeling.

Post-it or tab style ground signage rather than monument style. Very internet feeling.

More nice aluminum cladding, a little sky.

More nice aluminum cladding, a little sky.

The previous shot featured uplights, connection details and a large sprinkler head (?)

The previous shot featured uplights, connection details and a large sprinkler head (?)

Ooh. Intentional or not, this blasted heath look in the front sculpture garden is nice.

Ooh. Intentional or not, this blasted heath look in the front sculpture garden is nice.

Planes and perspectives shift as the 1899 Post Office bldg comes into view. You can begin to see how the angle of the new overhang just misses the angle of the original roof line. Pretty sweet how they kiss.

Planes and perspectives shift as the 1899 Post Office bldg comes into view. You can begin to see how the angle of the new overhang just misses the angle of the original roof line. Pretty sweet how they kiss.

Other things in the neighborhood.

Other things in the neighborhood.

This I imagine to be the original art museum bldg, or perhaps a library. My surmise due to the invitation above the door "Open To All" a common Midwestern mandate for museums and public bldgs. Aah, to have a civic-minded culture here in our own city.

This I imagine to be the original art museum bldg, or perhaps a library. My surmise due to the invitation above the door "Open To All" a common Midwestern mandate for museums and public bldgs. Aah, to have a civic-minded culture here in our own city.

All above: a side court along Market Street, sculpture garden, good roofline shots.

All above: a side court along Market Street, sculpture garden, good roofline shots.

A series of details documenting a lack of concern (almost) for hiding necessaries. Straightforward rather than fussy, while still exhibiting care for the visual and physical experience. This inside the S. High Street entrance.

A series of details documenting a lack of concern (almost) for hiding necessaries. Straightforward rather than fussy, while still exhibiting care for the visual and physical experience. This inside the S. High Street entrance.

This is in the Market Street side court. "You need doors? Okay." btw - see farther above, the handles glint nicely on this darker side of the site.

This is in the Market Street side court. "You need doors? Okay." btw - see farther above, the handles glint nicely on this darker side of the site.

Above, all: the perimeter - turning the corner from Market to S. High Street and coming upon the entrance. The double-hung entrance.

Above, all: the perimeter - turning the corner from Market to S. High Street and coming upon the entrance. The double-hung entrance.

Coop Himmelb(l)au link

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

A quick blast for calendaring

Mark Hagen, "Vapor Parade," 2010 Holographic double-axis diffraction grating film, 98 1/2 x 59 inches. Installation at LAXART in February, 2010.

Mark Hagen, "Vapor Parade," 2010 Holographic double-axis diffraction grating film, 98 1/2 x 59 inches. Installation at LAXART in February, 2010.

The Torrance Art Museum opens “Telephone” on May 28. Too many are the artists to list, or so I tell myself. Then I see some of the names and I am compelled to cut and paste….. hold your breath:

Eric Yahnker, Ginny Cook, Chris Peters, Julie Orser, Vincent Ramos, Elana Mann, Adam Overton, Margaret Wappler, Andrew Choate, Jeanne Hoel, Madison Brookshire, Alexandra Cuesta, Ben Rodkin, Vera Brunner-Sung, Victor Hu, Tanya Rubbak, William Ransom, Oona Gardner, Christian Tedeschi, Julie Schustack, Thomas Muller, Margaret Griffith, Jamison Carter, Phung Huynh, David Yamamoto, Julia Paull, Shelby Roberts, Betsy Seder, Daniel Ingroff, Christine Frerichs, Asher Hartman, Haruko Tanaka, Patrick Strand, Marisa Sayler, James E Anderson, Ariane Vielmetter, Gregory Michael Hernandez , Melissa Manfull, Alexander Kroll, and Renee Petropoulos.

Get on the 110 or the 405 or the 91 (the Richard Nixon Freeway of olde) and head to Torrance. Do not whine about distance. If you can drive to the west side (or the east side) to see shows then you can certainly drive to the South Bay. Cheers.

Mark Hagen "To Be Titled (Additive Painting #16)" 2011 Acrylic on Burlap 70 x 54 inches  (177.8 x 137.2 cm) Framed

Mark Hagen "To Be Titled (Additive Painting #16)" 2011 Acrylic on Burlap 70 x 54 inches (177.8 x 137.2 cm) Framed

Foolish me missed that Mark Hagen is having a show at China Art Objects. So cool! Here’s some text from iD / iSpy about Hagen’s participation in California Dreamin’ a recent international exhibition.

Artist Curated Projects are having a flat file sale. A kind of late spring cleaning, if you will. May 29 from 2 to 8 pm at 5152 La Vista Court, LA 90004.

Marc Camille Chaimowicz, installation view, Secession 2009

Marc Camille Chaimowicz, installation view, Secession 2009Marc Camille Chaimowicz, installation view, Secession 2009

Have I forgotten to remind you to see “The Rose Colored Room” at Overduin and Kite? If only I had images, I tell myself. Did any of you see architect Annie Chu’s reconstruction of Rudolph Schindler’s life guard shack at MOCA a few years ago? Marc Camille Chaimowicz creates a wooden structure with equally fascinating details and coming from an entirely other part of the universe. Possibly informed by Schindler and others, certainly, but all Chaimowicz’ and really nice to see.

Failing images of my own or from Overduin and Kite, I shall get out my image hoover and scoop up what I can find online for the artists concerned.

Without a doubt you should see this show, it closes on June 11. Hurry anyway or you’ll forget!

Um, I won’t be able to find any images that represent the work provided by Dianna Molzan. She has corseted the columns in O and K’s east room. This is completely hot. Plus it makes me think new things about Molzan’s other work. Deception, drawing attention to support and structure – there’s an Alice in Wonderland aspect to this work, too. I also hadn’t thought of her work as sexy, now I have to go back and look again.

Jutta Koether, "Berliner Schlüssel #9", 2010 220 x 169 cm Acrylic on canvas. From Galerie Daniel Bucholz.

Jutta Koether, "Berliner Schlüssel #9", 2010 220 x 169 cm Acrylic on canvas. From Galerie Daniel Bucholz.

Marc Camille Chaimowicz, installation view, Secession 2009

Marc Camille Chaimowicz, installation view, Secession 2009

Oh dear, I gotta go. Concert. John Adams et al at Disney Hall. Eek.

Probably won’t get much more complete – we leave tomorrow for the Midwest and the amazement of family, Yay.

Back soon, promise.

Geoff

(Sorry Lisa Lapinski – couldn’t grab any images in time…..)

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Intervening in the Picture Plane

Rebecca Morris "Untitled (#01-10)," 2010 oil and spray paint on canvas 84 x 72 inches. Image from Anaba blog.

Rebecca Morris "Untitled (#01-10)," 2010 oil and spray paint on canvas 84 x 72 inches. Image from Anaba blog.

Olivia Booth, "Because the Night...," 2010 glass, paint, string, nail, 24"x 22" approx.

Olivia Booth, "Because the Night...," 2010 glass, paint, string, nail, 24"x 22" approx.

Olivia Booth, “13 Steps to Opening Up Shop”, 2010, MKE to LAX (curated by Sara Daleiden), Woodbury Hollywood Exhibitions, LA

Olivia Booth, “13 Steps to Opening Up Shop”, 2010, MKE to LAX (curated by Sara Daleiden), Woodbury Hollywood Exhibitions, LA

Sarah Cain, "Midnight Mission," California Biennial at 533, 2009

Sarah Cain, "Midnight Mission," California Biennial at 533, 2009

Kim Fisher, "Lunar Eclipse," 2009 Oil on linen 72 x 63 inches. Image from Fourteen30 in Portland.

Kim Fisher, "Lunar Eclipse," 2009 Oil on linen 72 x 63 inches. Image from Fourteen30 in Portland.

Corrina Peipon and Jill Spector "Friends and Relations" quilt 30 x 22 inches, from the recent LACE Auction.

Corrina Peipon and Jill Spector "Friends and Relations" quilt 30 x 22 inches, from the recent LACE Auction.

Talks on Painting: Intervening in the Picture Plane

Sunday, May 29 7pm

Mandrake Bar
2692 South La Cienega Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90034

In this panel discussion with Olivia Booth, Sarah Cain, Kim Fisher, and Rebecca Morris, moderator Corrina Peipon
will lead a discussion on abstraction with a focus on the material and formal aspects of painting as subject matter.
To varying degrees, the four painters included here make interventions into the picture plane in order to explore the
tangible matter of painting, favoring physicality over illusion.

A note from Corrina Peipon on Sunday’s talk:

This panel discussion is the first of three discussions about painting that are being organized by Mari Eastman, Rebecca Morris, and Jill Newman. Mari invited me to moderate one of them, and then Rebecca and I started talking about contemporary trends in abstraction as a potential topic, and I chose the artists.

In the past few years, I’ve been particularly attracted to abstraction that involves deep attention to the basic materials of painting, engaging in a kind of deconstruction. It’s a different kind than that of the 1960s-1970s (or maybe 1950s-1970s); it is not about taking painting apart, and there is not any hostility toward the medium in this new deconstruction. Rather, the painters making what I am calling “interventions in the picture plane” do so out of a deeply sensual connection to the materials of painting. By materials, I mean everything from the actual paint and canvas to composition and art history. In this way, painting almost becomes the subject of the painting.

Friends out in the city reading and looking – I won’t be able to attend this discussion. I’ll be happily in the Midwest, visiting people I love. I can think of a bunch of questions I’d like to ask – good lord with such a power-packed panel I bet you can, too!

Go to Mandrake on Sunday, have a drink or two if you require emboldening, then ask questions.

Um, don’t get out of hand. Play nice.

(I enjoy the inadvertent poetry of uploading text from a pdf source. Some oddity of formatting gave the brief description above that nice shape.)

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Jennifer West at Andy Perry’s house

Carpenteria home of surfer Andy Perry by Jennifer West, scene of West's HOME SHOW, REVISITED project. This photo pre-party (just).

Carpenteria home of surfer Andy Perry by Jennifer West, scene of West's HOME SHOW, REVISITED project. This photo pre-party (just).

A party is a flat space in time where a million streams of life come together and mix things up.A party is a flat space in time where a million streams of life come together and mix things up.

A party is a flat space in time where a million streams of life come together and mix things up.

Party to celebrate Jennifer West's film and the participants: makers and riders of the waves, all. (Be those waves of water or of light.) This and above photo by Elizabeth Harper.

Party to celebrate Jennifer West's film and the participants: makers and riders of the waves, all. (Be those waves of water or of light.) This and above photo by Elizabeth Harper.

Do you know? The photos I got for this Jennifer West post are just beautiful, and even the incidental ones are filled with electricity and excitement. Sad is the wordsmith.  (But happy are the lookers!)

When we met, Jennifer talked about growing up in Topanga and being aware of surfers as a community. Note that is a community rather than a lifestyle – I understood from Jennifer that she saw them as a group of individual outsiders, opposed by the larger culture even while they stayed to themselves. As an example she offered a community of beach shacks in Lower Topanga Canyon that for years had been home to surfers, artists, musicians and other beach people that and was demolished make way for Topanga State Beach. “The misfits no longer fit in.” One story has it that the last ramshackle structure was burned to the ground in a final act of defiance. We all know that the California beaches are littered with millionaires now and free spirits must find a way to adapt to remain.

Early showings of surf films to their audiences was the job of an itinerant group of exhibitors who would carry the films from high school auditorium to community center and so on, charging a couple of bucks and offering an open-minded venue. Typically beer was present and bottle tops would be launched at the screen. Teenagers, youths and unruly romantics - sounds like some good days, huh?

Early showings of surf films to their audiences was the job of an itinerant group of exhibitors who would carry the films from high school auditorium to community center and so on, charging a couple of bucks and offering an open-minded venue. Typically beer was present and bottle tops would be launched at the screen. Teenagers, youths and unruly romantics - sounds like some good days, huh?

Jennifer also talked of being inspired by such early surf film-makers as Bud Browne, John Severson’s THE ANGRY SEA, and films by George Greenough.

Great images of Lower Topanga from the 1960s courtesy Brass Tacks Press, also some from the 1970s.

Great! Original first six minutes of LOCKED IN – Bud Browne’s famous (legendary) 1964 film. Really cool deconstruction of surf action plus a sweet echo echo echo chamber effect on the first mention of the film’s title “Locked In.”

Hmm. To help us understand just what heaven might be like and why it is exactly that people surf, watch Greenough’s 1973 CRYSTAL VOYAGER in ten minute chunks. Sure glory. (And, it being the 1970s, the music was great, too. Link to entire 23 minute Pink Floyd “Echoes” a main part of the soundtrack.)

I understand that Jennifer West first discussed working with an older film such as one of these for her source, and that the enthusiasm of surfer Andy ‘No – you should make a film!’ Perry helped make up her mind. (Having seen the result, I say yay to filming anew. You will, too.)

The above film stills are all credited as follows, as indeed are the additional film stills that I shall upload soon. This second batch I hoovered up off of Facebook.

Film still credit:

Dawn Surf Jellybowl Film (16mm film negative sanded with surfboard shaping tools, sex wax melted on, squirted, dripped, splashed, sprayed and rubbed with donuts, zinc oxide, cuervo, sunscreen, hydrogen peroxide,  tecate, sand, tar, scraped with a shark’s tooth, edits made by the surf  and a seal while film floated in waves- surfing performed by Andy Perry, Makela Moore, Alanna Moore, Zach Moore, Johnny McCann – shot by Peter West – film negative sanded by Mariah Csepanyi, Andy Perry and Jwest), 2011
16mm film negative transferred in Hi Definition Video, projector, projection screen, beer bottle caps, blankets, pillows
Commissioned by the Contemporary Arts Forum, Santa Barbara, California

Courtesy of MARC FOXX, Los Angeles

More stories, more photos soon. It is 6:11 pm on Monday – some Monday – in May.

Cheers!

The more: (It is 7:04 am on the following Tuesday – the sun is shining through the shades and into my eyes, the sound of traffic on Melrose provides a background rumble to my various YouTube meanderings and I am ready to rock n roll.) Lately it’s Husker Du “Celebrated Summer” and Michael Jackson “First Moon Walk Ever.”

West talks a lot about the community who makes her films with her. Check again the full title of this “Dawn Surf” film – each participant is named and each action is documented. I think this is not a strategy of denying authorship, rather West wants to – and wants us to – acknowledge the authorship of social activity. While the work is guided by Jennifer West’s singular creative intelligence, the means and methods are in the hands of a community of sorts. In the case of “Dawn Surf” it is a community that preexists West’s film-making (as a group of individuals and as a tradition) and that shares her spirit of adventure.

This film, as all Jennifer’s films do, make me consider ‘essences,’ as in “the essence of surfing” and “the integral matter of a party” and “an unspoken but shared thrill that travels through a group of people who are contributing together.” These are all things that we can’t quantify and that, rationally speaking, we shouldn’t be able to discern physically or sensually. This might be where West’s titles come in – as noted, these list all the materials, persons and circumstances of her films. So we do have cues for our intuition, should we choose to set it free. Also the medium of film lends itself to just this kind of belief, this is the much sought-after ‘power of film.’ We watch flickering lights and receive messages – if we’re alone we feel at one with the film and the actors, if we are in a crowd we begin to act as a unit – responding similarly to similar stimuli.

In an interesting way the titles of her films also serve like talismans – when I hold them in my mind as I am being seduced I am aware of my seduction and my complicity. I think this honesty and offering of critical distance is what charms me most.

Especially with this “Home Show, Revisited” film installation, shown in the front yard of a second generation surfer’s wood-framed house in Carpenteria, surrounded by the participants, other neighborhood surfers, artists from the exhibition and whoever happened to be walking by; as I watched the film and appreciated its beauty,  I also – in that fine salt air – forgot that I was looking at art.

Film still credit:

Dawn Surf Jellybowl Film (16mm film negative sanded with surfboard shaping tools, sex wax melted on, squirted, dripped, splashed, sprayed and rubbed with donuts, zinc oxide, cuervo, sunscreen, hydrogen peroxide,  tecate, sand, tar, scraped with a shark’s tooth, edits made by the surf  and a seal while film floated in waves- surfing performed by Andy Perry, Makela Moore, Alanna Moore, Zach Moore, Johnny McCann – shot by Peter West – film negative sanded by Mariah Csepanyi, Andy Perry and Jwest), 2011
16mm film negative transferred in Hi Definition Video, projector, projection screen, beer bottle caps, blankets, pillows
Commissioned by the Contemporary Arts Forum, Santa Barbara, California

Courtesy of MARC FOXX, Los Angeles

Above Production Stills Credited – Photographs by Mariah Csepanyi and Jwest

At Channel Islands Surf, in Carpenteria, five hundred feet of film (that had already been ‘edited by the surf’ were sanded, scraped with a shark’s tooth, etc. in six foot lengths. On the surface of a surfboard, hence the six foot lengths. Um, six goes into five hundred around eighty-three times. Are your hands tired yet?

One final image fiesta: a surf combine grid, courtesy Jwest herself. Enjoy:

And do, when you travel up to Carpenteria to see this film and installation remember what Jennifer West told me about experiencing it:

“I was thinking of a story James Benning told me, about seeing a Douglas Gordon film screened in a drive-in theater in Twentynine Palms. It was dusk, the sky was still light and as the sun set the light of the movie filled the screen. This is how I imagine seeing “Dawn Surf Jellybowl Film…” at Andy’s house in Carpenteria.”

Blogger David Harding shares his experience of the same Douglas Gordon film at davidharding.net. By the way, the Gordon installation was titled “Five Year Drive By.” Image from Medien Kunst Netz below.

Douglas Gordon, "Five Year Drive By," link to Medienkunstnetz.de

Douglas Gordon, "Five Year Drive By," link to Medienkunstnetz.de

P.S.

Tell you what, my friends. Without haphazard input from my peripatetic wanderings on the web (meaning randomly subjected messages from friends that contain additional information I can also use) I’d never get anywhere. Intending another thing entirely a conversation mate just reminded to that East of Borneo has an interview with Jennifer West up and running. Also two films for viewing:

The Film Looks Like a Licked Sunset: A Conversation with Jennifer West (by Quinn Latimer)

Jam Licking and Sledge-hammered Film (2008)

Nirvana Alchemy Film (2007)

Plus Jennifer recommended:

This Long Century Blog

Kaleidoscope Press

Hasta.

(oops – there is much more to Home Show, Revisited)

CAF Part 1: Michele O’Marah – Video Portraits

CAF Part 2: Conversation with curator Miki Garcia

CAF Part 3: The Home Show in general – 1988, 1996

CAF Part 4: Florian Morlat – A Monument for the Dovers

CAF Part 5: Bettina Hubby for Home Show, Revisited

CAF Part 6: Jennifer West at Andy Perry’s house

CAF Part 7: Jennifer Rochlin for Home Show, Revisited

CAF Part 8: Evan Holloway: Art History = Successful Products + Time (a smorgasbord)

CAF Part 9: “Home Show” again

CAF Part 10: “One More Time For Home Show 1988

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Reviews | Leave a comment

Ed Johnson at Kristi Engle and more

My friends, my friends, my friends,

There’s a painting show you should see. This is going to mean visiting the near east side but I promise that you’ll be glad you did.

Ed Johnson, "Devil Among the Tailors," 2011, oil on plexiglass 29" x 42"

Ed Johnson, "Devil Among the Tailors," 2011, oil on plexiglass 29" x 42"

Ed Johnson’s show at Kristi Engle did a bunch of things to my eyes and my brain. First off, I walked in expecting to see five paintings hanging pretty simply  on the walls. I’ve been looking at Johnson’s paintings since around 2003 – at Peter Bartlett’s old Hayworth Gallery and around town. He’s pretty consistent. In the past I had seen a small image field – 4″ x 6″ or so, in a larger white field of gessoed plexiglass. His imagery would be adapted from ‘hillbilly’ movies and from photographs. The clarity of these modest Smokey Mountain dramas would be diffused by several incidences of mediation – the original mediation of reality to picture, a ‘Hollywood’ sort of filter, and then Ed’s own screwing with the image by photographing several times using different low-fi technologies. Hmm. Ed can really render – the screwing that he does with his images I think for him provides some distance from craft and technical perfection. It all just fascinates me – I throw any distancing away and dive into  pleasure at  seeing such unsettled perfection. The labor it takes him to depict his images disappears in the flatness of his rendering.

Back to the five paintings on the walls right now. Johnson’s working methods haven’t altered, but his strategy for exhibiting the paintings has advanced and gotten riskier. And very satisfying.

Albert Pinkham-Ryder, "Dead Bird," n.d. oil on wood panel, 4 3/8" x 10 Phillips Collection, acquired 1928

Albert Pinkham-Ryder, "Dead Bird," n.d. oil on wood panel, 4 3/8" x 10 Phillips Collection, acquired 1928

Albert Pinkham-Ryder, "Moonlit Cove," n.d. oil on canvas, 4 1/8" x 17 1/8" Phillips Collection, acquired 1922

Albert Pinkham-Ryder, "Moonlit Cove," n.d. oil on canvas, 4 1/8" x 17 1/8" Phillips Collection, acquired 1922

Horace Pippin, "The Elk," 1945 Oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 22 13/16 in. Pneesylvania Academy of Fine Arts Bequest of David J. Grossman in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Grossman and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Speiser

Horace Pippin, "The Elk," 1945 Oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 22 13/16 in. Pneesylvania Academy of Fine Arts Bequest of David J. Grossman in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Grossman and Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Speiser

George Bellows, "Hunter and Mountains" 1920 Oil on wood 18 x 22 in. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel W. Dietrich II

George Bellows, "Hunter and Mountains" 1920 Oil on wood 18 x 22 in. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel W. Dietrich II

While I was talking with Johnson at the gallery he mentioned, during a conversation about his slow approach to painting, admiring Albert Pinkham-Ryder for his unwillingness to complete a work. Perhaps this comes across as too emphatic – when I queried Ed on spending several years on half  a dozen paintings he laughed self depracatingly and shrugged and made the allusion to Pinkham-Ryder.

He also mentioned George Bellows and Horace Pippin. What he did not mention, and I guess there is no reason he would since these aren’t painters, are many of the early Minimalist sculptors. I’m thinking here of the second through the fourth rooms of Ann Goldstein’s Minimal Future exhibition at MOCA and the wooden sculptures that in illustration appear so very seamless and in real life distinctly showed the hand of the artist as craftsperson.

I’ll upload just a few installation images then I have to go for a bit. Um, I’m on vacation in Santa Barbara at the lovely Cheshire Cat Inn) and need a disco nap so I can party tonight ;-]

(As a matter of fact, I’m not on really vacation – I am currently indulging two of my passions: researching contemporary art, and being pampered in a beautiful setting. The exhibition I have been posting about, Home Show, Revisited, is opening this weekend and I am in town to continue my looking and my artist interviews. My aforementioned base of operations, The Cheshire Cat Inn, is about the most gracious accommodation that one can imagine. The setting is an early twentieth century mansion in a garden-filled neighborhood, our room has a sunny balcony overlooking oak trees and roses, and our hostess/innkeeper is cheerfully engaging and full of stories about world travel and Santa Barbara tidbits. Yes, Santa Barbara is heavenly in spring.)

Ed Johnson, “Devil Among the Tailors,” Kristi Engle Gallery, 5002 York Blvd, Highland Park, 90042

More about Ed Johnson, more about the CAF and news of a truly exciting and star-studded panel at Mandrake next weekend(Sunday, May 29 at 7 PM). “Intervening in the Picture Plane” will be moderated by Corrina Peipon and includes Olivia Booth, Sarah Cain, Kim Fisher, and Rebecca Morris.

Additional excellence to brag on LA about! Life continues to be good.

Bye for now,

Geoff

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Reviews | Leave a comment