Mark Hagen, T.B.A.

Mark Hagen, Installation view of TBA gallery two.

Mark Hagen, Installation view of TBA gallery two.

It seems as though I missed the closing of this show and I’m sorry. I hope you made it out to China Art Objects during the run of Mark Hagen’s exhibition?

What might it mean to capture or enclose a random distribution of particles within a defined shape? Like cutting slices out of a pie of entropy, Mark Hagen’s obsidian sculptures exist as referents to universe-scaled questions about time and matter.

It is true that obsidian is called by scientists an ‘amorphous solid’ because it lacks crystalline structure, a parenthetical statement might note that glasses such as obsidian are a special class of amorphous solids which become liquid under favorable circumstances. It helps me to think of this as matter existing in two states at once, liquid and solid. It also helps me to extend this notion backward and forward, to the moment in the Cretaceous Period when liquid obsidian cooled to a solid and also to a possible future when it may return to the liquid state.

Mark Hagen, To Be Titled (Subtractive Sculpture #5) detail 2011 Obsidian and Steel 54 x 18 x 18 inches

Mark Hagen, To Be Titled (Subtractive Sculpture #5) detail 2011 Obsidian and Steel 54 x 18 x 18 inches

Mark Hagen, To Be Titled (Subtractive and Additive Sculpture #6) detail, 2011, Obsidian and Steel, 54 x 18 x 18 inches

Mark Hagen, To Be Titled (Subtractive and Additive Sculpture #6) detail, 2011, Obsidian and Steel, 54 x 18 x 18 inches

As you see above, Hagen takes advantage of the natural iridescence of some obsidian. Gas bubbles formed during a lava flow then captured during cooling produce this effect, reminding me again of that moment of making. Rainbow Obsidian and Snowflake Obsidian (which feature captured crystals of a white mineral) are prized among those rock collectors who value beauty, and in ancient times these materials were used to make jewelry and objects of worship. The more mundane obsidians were used to make weapons – arrowheads and sometimes swords. Extremely fine blades, obsidian makes, with an edge that may be only molecules thick. I have blood on my notebook to give evidence of this, and I didn’t feel a thing!

“I’ve never seen a good mandala, except perhaps the sand one’s that monks make. Mostly, the symbols have been subsumed into New Age kitsch and now are produced for armchair tourists of ‘Eastern’ philosophies.”

Thus did Hagen introduce to me the subject of his “Directionless Field” photographs, he went on to talk about his desire to work with science as it exists today, and to locate an ideal or possible sublime within his materials. Hence, for his photos Hagen disassembles a camera (a sublime image-maker whose time is still passing), “To see how it works” and uses the lenses, refractors, shiny parts of metal, etc., to create still lifes of light and object. In fact, the refracted light in these photos present as having mass – which then takes my mind back to our friend obsidian, caught as it is between two states.

This project of Hagen’s also brings to my mind the work of Christopher Williams, whose photographs are ‘of’ the means of communication and production. (See Mark Wyse’s essay “Too Drunk to Fuck (On the Anxiety of Photography” in your copy of Words Without Pictures for a clearly stated precis of Williams’ art.)

(Oh! I find that a nice person who titles him or her self ‘A Photo Student,’ in a website titled ‘A Virtual MFA’ has cleverly uploaded a pdf of said essay. Awesome job my friend!!! Read Wyses’s wise words on A Photo Student here. This nice person is named James Pomerantz.)

The resulting images are mirrored and then mirrored again, making the directionless field of his title, their blackness also mirrors the obsidian sculptures and Hagen’s use of photography in this work curiously reflects the references to photography in his method of making paintings.

Mark Hagen, Installation view of TBA in gallery one.

Mark Hagen, Installation view of TBA in gallery one.

Mark Hagen, To Be Titled (Additive Painting #27) 2011 Acrylic on Burlap 88 x 67.5 inches

Mark Hagen, To Be Titled (Additive Painting #27) 2011 Acrylic on Burlap 88 x 67.5 inches

Starting with pieces of sun-tanned burlap, a natural material that still shows bits of plant fiber and leaf matter in its making, (Ok, I have to make a connection to surfing here, I just have to. Hagen resembles a handsome surfer, much of his obsidian material comes from a cache in Malibu, suntanning is de rigueur for beach combers, and if you’ve ever spent time listening to the a-crystalline poetic and philosophical musings of the tribe that hangs ten you will recognize some of the concerns of this work. Smithson, were he a Californian, would have surfed. He might have been less nihilistic than he was had he such a connection to cyclical renewal as one gets from the sea.)

Continuing, Hagen takes his sheets of burlap, lays them on tables weighted down with stones (I think I recall this), and he applies white house paint in layers. Thick, heavy layers that soak all the way through his twiney and rough ground. Hagen marks his burlap canvases into quarters and thirds and uses diagonals to connect these points. He works all the way through each of his formulas before he moves on or adds an iteration. The paintings are displayed ‘backwards,’ with the first layer of paint showing. The past is first, in other words, and the layer that was poured closest to the present moment is hidden behind the work. Time is again brought into the discussion, this time it is reversed. Sweet.

Do you know the work of Roman Opalka? I seem to think of him almost monthly since I saw his show at Selwyn’s when it was in Beverly Hills. Opalka paints time, you may see for yourself here.

In Opalka’s own words, his technique:

“The fundamental basis of my work, to which I have dedicated my life, manifests itself in a process of recording a progression that both documents time and also defines it. It began on a single date in 1965, the one on which I undertook my first “Detail”.”

“Each “Detail” is a part of a greater idea conceived on that date. My work records the progression to infinity, through the first and the last number painted on the canvas.”

“I inscribe the progression of numbers beginning with one, proceeding to infinity, on canvases of the same size, 77.17 x 53.15 in (196 x 135 cm), in white by hand with a paintbrush. Since 1972 I have been making each canvas’ background about 1% whiter each time. Thus the moment will arrive when I will paint white on white. Since 2008, I have painted in white on a white background, which I call “blanc mérité” (white well earned).”

“After each work session in my studio, I take a photograph of my face in front of the “Detail” that I have been working on. Each “Detail” is accompanied by a tape recording of my voice saying the numbers out loud as I write them.”

Roman Opalka, a detail of 99940 - 1017875 (1965)

Roman Opalka, a detail of 99940 - 1017875 (1965)

Roman Opalka - Détail 800149-816708 1965/1-∞ (particolare) - courtesy Galleria Michela Rizzo, Venezia

Roman Opalka - Détail 800149-816708 1965/1-∞ (particolare) - courtesy Galleria Michela Rizzo, Venezia

As Mr. Opalka told it to David at the October 2002 opening, on that date in 1965 he was waiting for his wife and friends in a cafe. Opalka’s artistic concern, and that of his friends, was time – and how to represent time in art. He had a pretty simple and hugely resonant idea in that cafe, and has spent his life pursuing this idea. By the way, Opalka’s last painting has already been sold, I suppose in the terms of today that would be ‘optioned’ to a museum in Germany. Pretty cool, to have an endpoint. His work, and time, will stop for Opalka. At that point the work will be complete as one piece, scattered around the earth. Cool and more cool.

This came to my mind in Mark Hagen’s studio because of his reservation of titling rights until some unstated future date.  There are many implications embedded in this decision of Hagen’s, not least of which is the fun potential for wreaking havoc in galleryies, collections and libraries around the world who own Hagen’s work or catalogs of his work.

Mark Hagen, Detail view of installation.

Mark Hagen, Detail view of installation.

Mark Hagen, Additive Sculpture Screen

Mark Hagen, Additive Sculpture Screen

Additive Sculpture Screens are the first work I saw by Hagen, at China Art in Chinatown. They make me think of prehistoric structures, of walls meant as much for worship and objectification as for protection and the delimiting of space. Passing by them does wonderful things to your perception, objects slip and twitch past like an old fashioned film that is skipping.

The first gallery, pictured several times above, had me feeling the eerie sensation I get in places that feel ancient – like when I was a teenager climbing in the hills and found a chalk cliff at the end of a narrow canyon: the space had significance, and I was a fanciful person and made this into a place of reflection, a site for obeisances and shivers and respect. Hagen’s sculptures though, are part of the built environment. Perhaps if I’d been to Stonehenge – but no, that might be too literal.

Geoff Tuck

 

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Reviews | Leave a comment

Images from this weeek’s email, plus a few

James Hill, illustration for Oscar Wilde's Short Stories collection, 1968. Link to George Macy Imagery blog.

James Hill, illustration for Oscar Wilde's Short Stories collection, 1968. Link to George Macy Imagery blog.

Charlott Markus, Pigment print on Hahnemühle paper, 60x40 cm, Edition 10, 2009. Link to LM Projects.

Charlott Markus, Pigment print on Hahnemühle paper, 60x40 cm, Edition 10, 2009. Link to LM Projects.

David Gilbert, the party, 2010

David Gilbert, the party, 2010

Kathrin Sonntag, Heutu Bleibe Ich Daheim, 2005, 19 slides, Courtesy Galerie Kamm, Berlin

Kathrin Sonntag, Heutu Bleibe Ich Daheim, 2005, 19 slides, Courtesy Galerie Kamm, Berlin

Ian Pedigo A First Slight Beginning or Appearance, 2008, insulation foam sheet, acoustic ceiling tile, cotton strips, 40 x 62 x 35 inches

Ian Pedigo A First Slight Beginning or Appearance, 2008, insulation foam sheet, acoustic ceiling tile, cotton strips, 40 x 62 x 35 inches

This final image above is of course, not contemporary art. Rather it is an illustration again, this from a 1946 Omar Kayyam and is by Arthur Szyk. Go to town on that one, take it for a date. Imagine sitting reading this book at Intelligentsia! Cheers.

LM Projects is opening “Voluntary Sculptures” this Saturday, July 9. Among all the other things you do next Saturday (and there is a ton of great stuff opening) you ought to swing by 124 W. 4th Street, Suite 103 and see what’s up. Pedigo is a long time hero, Gilbert a more recent fascinator and about Sonntag and Markus I know nothing, except those images are beguiling. Gallery linked in each image. Visit.

Here I am, sneaking an additional image in. This is David Gilbert's contribution to Leila Khastoo's recent "Biege & Plastic" exhibition. Excellent show that was, and if you missed it this image should cause you to regret your lack of attention.

Here I am, sneaking an additional image in. This is David Gilbert's contribution to Leila Khastoo's recent "Biege & Plastic" exhibition. Excellent show that was, and if you missed it this image should cause you to regret your lack of attention.

I’ll be a while uploading things, enjoy for a while – this post will grow during the course of the day. Geoff

Matt Lipps Untitled (Shape), 2010 chromogenic print 40 x 53 inches

Matt Lipps Untitled (Shape), 2010 chromogenic print 40 x 53 inches

Andrew Cameron Vue de Mer (Cloudy Skies) c. 1856, 2010 graphite on paper and artist’s tape 17 x 11 1/2 inches

Andrew Cameron Vue de Mer (Cloudy Skies) c. 1856, 2010 graphite on paper and artist’s tape 17 x 11 1/2 inches

Mark Wyse How to Improve Your Marriage Without Talking About It, 2011 chromogenic print 30 x 22 inches

Mark Wyse How to Improve Your Marriage Without Talking About It, 2011 chromogenic print 30 x 22 inches

Hi my friends, good lord it’s Wednesday now and look how little I’ve accomplished in terms of uploading the email images to the blog. Perhaps it’s the repetition of labor, perhaps I’m in a different mental state when I am working in email space – something in the aesthetics and the means of delivery is influencing my choices when I am there and the blog does not correlate, exactly. Continuing now with the show at Pepin Moore…

Dwyer Kilcollin The Seeker (Void Vernon), 2011 Hydrocal and aluminum armature with lacquer finish 10 x 11 x 10 inches

Dwyer Kilcollin The Seeker (Void Vernon), 2011 Hydrocal and aluminum armature with lacquer finish 10 x 11 x 10 inches

Above, a few images that jump out at me from the Pepin Moore website.

The exhibition, Soo Kim’s curatorial project “US EST,” opened June 11 so the significant thing about the show this weekend (other than a second opportunity to see the work) OJO will be performing because…..

IT’S JOHN RYAN MOORE’S AND GENEVIEVE PEPIN’S FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF EXISTENCE AS PEPIN MOORE GALLERY, PURVEYORS OF FINE ART AND IDEAS.

Yay and congratulations. Awesome job you are doing there on Chung King Road.

Saturday, July 10 and it might be at midnight, check the gallery to be certain.

OJO LOGO (AHA!)

OJO LOGO (AHA!)

At Human Resources / Cottage Home Taft Green will be presenting “Act Natural.” (for which I can only find a Facebook link, so if you haven’t yet – join fb)

Lacking images for the above Mr. Green exhibition, I’ll quote from the press release:

“Human Resources presents Taft Green’s collaborative project, Act Natural, From July 9th – August 3rd, which explores the systems that grow, distribute and consume coffee. The opening reception will take place on July 9th from 6 -10pm.”

“Using a reduced geometry, the exhibition transforms the multi-layered process of drinking coffee into a dialog of spatial and associative superimposition, structural quotation, and the complexity found in the contingency of interruption. How coffee is presented to the consumer is a reduction of elaborate terms. Coffee effects most systems of circulation; structures domestic ritual, infiltrates the work place, and is carried in the nervous system. Each phase of coffee usage involves specific decisions and tells a story. That story is performative, and is accompanied by coffee’s consumption. The plot to that performance is non-linear and, like any story, includes interruptions and a cast of characters, which are constructed through a language.”

The Ballad of Reading Gaol bookcover design by John S. Fass, 1937

The Ballad of Reading Gaol bookcover design by John S. Fass, 1937

Speaking as we were above of Matt Lipps, at some point next weekend you should and must go to Marc Selwyn on Wilshire. Lipps will be showing new photographic work in “Horizon/s” and you have two samples of the work to help you make up your mind to race across town n Saturday btwn 6 and 8 pm.

I suggest 6th Street. You can stop for tacos along the way and not have to worry about dinner.

Also opening in the vicinity is a large group exhibition at Acme. Stop by.

Both openings are Saturday, July 9 at 6ish.

Matt Lipps Untitled (Form), 2010 C-Print 40 x 53 inches Edition of 5 + 2 AP

Matt Lipps Untitled (Form), 2010 C-Print 40 x 53 inches Edition of 5 + 2 AP

Tony de los Reyes, The Dart, 2011 Bronze, hemp rope and steel cleat Dimensions variable

Tony de los Reyes, The Dart, 2011 Bronze, hemp rope and steel cleat Dimensions variable

, 2011 Hand screened print, edition of 10 22 x 22 inches “]Dont Rhine - Ultra-red, Protocols for a sound walk [1.2.1 London], 2011 Hand screened print, edition of 10 22 x 22 inches

Dont Rhine - Ultra-red, Protocols for a sound walk [1.2.1 London

Marc Dean Veca, Sorry Charlie (detail) India ink and acrylic on canvas

Marc Dean Veca, Sorry Charlie (detail) India ink and acrylic on canvas

Marc Dean Veca - Oh Yeah, 2011 India ink and acrylic on canvas 48 x 48"

Marc Dean Veca - Oh Yeah, 2011 India ink and acrylic on canvas 48 x 48"

Yong Soon Min - Overseas / at sea, stills from video installation, 2011

Yong Soon Min - Overseas / at sea, stills from video installation, 2011

Yong Soon Min - Overseas / at sea, stills from video installation, 2011

Yong Soon Min - Overseas / at sea, stills from video installation, 2011

Ken Gonzalez Day - Untitled (Cephalometer of Dr. DuMoutier with Artist's Head), 2011 lightjet print 60 x 96 in

Ken Gonzalez Day - Untitled (Cephalometer of Dr. DuMoutier with Artist's Head), 2011 lightjet print 60 x 96 in

Despite my stated misgivings about the institution, I admire the artists: the above images are from the recently closed COLA exhibition at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. (lachryma, melancholia, lamentations…)

More images from each of the COLA artists as well as essays and additional information may be viewed here at the gallery website.

Another OJO image

Another OJO image

You do know that there have been painting discussions taking place at Mandrake the past couple of weeks? Jill Newman, Mari Eastman and Rebecca Morris have organized three discussions, two are done and one is coming up on July 31. I will give you huge advance warning and I also plan to post some of my notes and interviews relating to the events. I’ll also direct your attention to our friends at East of Borneo, who will be uploading transcripts of the talks and of the planning sessions. Wow. Amazing, generous, exciting and more good news than one can possibly expect. Get ready. To tease you I’ll share a few quotes from this past Sunday “Painters Beyond Painting.”

“Basically all my work is about theft.”

“I’m not afraid!”

“What’s at the heart of this anxiety?”

“Failure is a big part of my process.”

“Who fetishizes painting?”

“I see my work as conversational.”

These toothsome morsels were spoken by, in no particular order, Amanda Ross Ho, Brett Cody Rogers, Thomas Lawson, Steve Roden and Jill Newman.

DO YOU OR DO YOU NOT WANT TO PAY ATTENTION?

MANDRAKE, SUNDAY JULY 31 AT 7 PM.

GET THERE EARLY.

Because if you don’t I’ll get your seat.

Cheers,

Geoff

Illustration by Hugo Steiner-Prag for "Tartuffe, or the Hypocrite," by Moliere

Illustration by Hugo Steiner-Prag for "Tartuffe, or the Hypocrite," by Moliere

Illustration by Lynd Ward for Beowulf, 1939ish

Illustration by Lynd Ward for Beowulf, 1939ish

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Wanderings | Leave a comment

End of June beginning of July, 2011

Danial Nord "State of the Art," 2011, mixed media. Credit: Gene Ogami, image from LA Times

Danial Nord "State of the Art," 2011, mixed media. Credit: Gene Ogami, image from LA Times

Hello, hello.

If we’re paying attention we all know that this is the final weekend for William Leavitt at MOCA. Related musical events are happening this weekend, Cage will be played among others. “the wulf” will be present!!!! Yay! I’m sorry that I’m going away. Sad me.

Also, although you wouldn’t know it unless you found the information somewhere other than the Municipal Art Gallery website, this is the closing weekend of this year’s COLA exhibition. That is, City of Los Angeles Grant, for artists in various media. Christopher Knight in the LA Times said good things, here.

Do you know – sometime during the course of 2011 a raucous ruckus was raised that “WE MUST STOP MOCA FROM TAKING OVER BARNSDALL!!!” I wondered then why the fuss and I wonder even more now. Given the current state of the institution and the space, MOCA would be doing us a favor to run it as an auxiliary exhibition gallery. I want to earnestly congratulate the artists who have been selected for the grant but also I feel badly that they are showing in the most negligent space in the city. “Sure (the City of Los Angeles tells them), I’ll give you a generous grant, but you must use it to make work and we will present in such a way that it looks awkward and is difficult to visit.”

It is time to revisit this COLA tradition as well as the need for a municipal art gallery in Los Angeles.

Give artists grants and set them free to do what they will with the money. Find some local institution who may be interested in the gallery space.

Micha Cardenas & Elle Mehrmand, technésexual, 2009

Micha Cardenas & Elle Mehrmand, technésexual, 2009

Thursday Nights at LACE hosts performance by Speculative this week.

The information I am about to pass along is way out of any time-based order, but I got an email about it yesterday and I am excited. Try to repress an excited Geoffrey.

Abel Baker Gutierrez has an exhibition opening at Luis de Jesus in Bergamot on July 23. Swimming, Gutierrez’ show is called, and its opening coincides with Shoshana Wayne’s getting-to-be-notorious Christian Cumming-Doug Harvey-curated madhouse of an exhibition, Chain Letter.

Where the hell will you be on Saturday, July 23? Say it aloud with me: “I’m going to Bergamot!”

Abel Baker Gutierrez, from the exhibition "Swimming," July, 2011 at Luis de Jesus

Abel Baker Gutierrez, from the exhibition "Swimming," July, 2011 at Luis de Jesus

Abel Baker Gutierrez, from the exhibition "Swimming," July, 2011 at Luis de Jesus

Abel Baker Gutierrez, from the exhibition "Swimming," July, 2011 at Luis de Jesus

Ooh. Abel Baker G is showing a video, too. Guaranteed to raise the ire of someone out there, these images and a film of troublingly, if quietly, sexualized Boy Scouts and boys playing. It’s funny how context has become everything for us today – as the press release points out Thomas Eakins made similar images. He’s ok, a hero even. But he did it then, when we can presume an innocent audience. (Or can we?) And Eakins wasn’t queer. (Or was he?) And we (or “Them,” depending on your point of view) are more advanced and sophisticated about these things. (And also our culture has become a culture of implacable moralizers. Huh. Are we more advanced and sophisticated? Hell – I’m not. I haven’t even figured out Joseph Kosuth yet.)

Betsy Hunt and Zach Moser at Elephant, Saturday, July 2 7 to 10 pm

Betsy Hunt and Zach Moser at Elephant, Saturday, July 2 7 to 10 pm

Another take on art and youthful charm is happening this weekend at Elephant with Fluff Wars (and here I’m quoting) “After generations of peace and prosperity, war was inevitable. The clans each had their own vision, but even the most patient negotiator realized that only fangs and metal would prevail. Soon, even the gentlest beasts of the most complacent clans were plunged into battle. So it began. Welcome to the Fluff Wars.” Fluff Wars: Prologue is a multimedia narrative installation using video, puppets, drawings, and sound. Betsy Hunt and Zach Moser are the artists responsible. Go and tell them hello.

Post is beginning another month of Kamikaze shows, one night exhibitions. July 1 we will see Devon Tsuno, July 2 will be Filmic by Carolyn Castaño, billed as “a one hour film screening and in situ narration starting at 7:30,” July 3 Danny Shain and July 4 HK Zamani.

In another jump to the future, Torrance Art Museum is doing “Baker’s Dozen III.” Thirteen are few enough to list: Chor Boogie, Joshua Callaghan, Erin Cosgrove, Martin Durazo, Amir H Fallah, Alexandra Grant, Annie Lapin, Thomas Lawson, Nathan Mabry, John Millei, Robert Olsen, Britton Tolliver and Peter Wu. Run your fingers through those yellow pages, art fans!! What a cool and disparate group, and how much fun to see. Exhibition opens Saturday, July 16 6 to 9 pm. Yay Max Presneill!!! Yay Jason Ramos!!!

Meanwhile, on the subject of shows to see during the daytime hours, Dennis Koch has new work at Marine Contemporary. I found some images on Juxtapoz which I’ll share. If you follow the link beware the freaking annoying lame video ad for pepsi. Soul eaters.

Dennis Koch, Novelty Vortex sculpture. Go see these, I want to hear what you think. I find them weird and neat.

Dennis Koch, Novelty Vortex sculpture. Go see these, I want to hear what you think. I find them weird and neat.

Drawing from Dennis Koch's show

Drawing from Dennis Koch's show

Human Resources closes out their “Queering Sex” exhibition and performance series with Dawn Kasper on Saturday, July 2. Kathryn Garcia and Sarvia Jasso curated this four day event that has included some thirty international artists.

A helpful (and fewer than four minute) talk with the curators on Vimeo.

Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, “Our identity is fiction, written by our parents, relatives, education, society.”

Skip Arnold, “Girls in bikinis. Girls in bikinis.”

Garcia and Jasso also run Second Floor, a private exhibition space in Brooklyn, NY that “provides artists a platform to develop, create and exhibit work outside of the traditional gallery framework.”

If you’ve already missed a bit of “Queering Sex,” you can catch up tonight through July 2.

Smith Family Thanksgiving at the V6 Ranch in Parkfield.

Smith Family Thanksgiving at the V6 Ranch in Parkfield.

Have happy weekends, enjoy whatever you do, brush your teeth after every meal. I’m going to Parkfield. Read Rancher Jack’s blog.

Bye.

Geoff

 

 

 

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

“Home Show” 1988 again

Hi friends,

Thanks to the valiant searches of my friends at the Contemporary Arts Forum I am able to share images of the 1988 installations. If you require a refresher, see the bottom of this post for links to past Home Show posts including writing on the two historical shows, 1988 and 1993.

I’ve a copy of the catalog in my hand and the power of internet searches, using these resources I’ll give you as much of a complete understanding (of the 1988 exhibition) as I am able.

Exhibition curator Betty Klausner states in her forward, “I recognized the brilliance of the concept (artist’s installations made public in private homes) and the appropriateness of it for Santa Barbara.” Her reference is to a 1986 New York Times article about a similar exhibition in Ghent. Klausner does not go on to elucidate her certainty of the city’s aptness for the project, but having now experienced Miki Garcia’s “Home Show, Revisited” (closing on July 21), and having also visited Santa Barbara several times, and studied up on the exhibitions and on the city, I recognize that part of the allure for the show is the city’s insular and somewhat xenophobic psychology. Who doesn’t want to poke around in the homes of others? And especially others who hold themselves apart.

As it happens the alphabet gives me my favorite image first, Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler’s “Picture Out of Doors.”

Kate Ericson & Mel Ziegler, Picture Out of Doors, 1988, row of various single doors, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Kate Ericson & Mel Ziegler, Picture Out of Doors, 1988, row of various single doors, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

This is so simple an idea, to remove all the doors in the house and line them up in the living room. And it opens out in my head so, so sweetly and in several directions, at once and also progressively as I look more. As homeowners (and art professionals) David and Pat Farmer note in the catalog “(We) consented to temporarily giving up almost all of our ability to keep certain parts of our daily life private.” Later in the text they note, “The removal of a cupboard door in a little-used back hall was a heavy assault to our ego. The accumulation of unrelated, unneeded, unwanted items revealed on those dusty shelves was staggering. Furthermore, this massive evidence of procrastination hidden from the world, from ourselves, felt disgraceful.” [Ed. Ever think about that word, disgraceful? Separated from grace. Nice.] A bit later, “Like the classic dream of appearing nude before an audience of completely clothed viewers, life in spaces wide open to the gaze of non-intimates is fraught with frightening vulnerability.”

And then comes a moment I am beginning to recognize from my other Home Show related readings: the thrill of doing a thing against the norm, “We were more stimulated than embarrassed, more delighted than inconvenienced… we rearranged everything, including the laundry supplies, paying special attention to how the now visible objects affected our feeling about the space.”

Catalog essayist Dore Ashton characterized Ericson and Ziegler’s installation as sociological and didactic, noting that “One can have an intellectual response, by debating the functions of the hidden in human lives, or one can have a moral response by debating the nature of this clear invitation (although invited) of the traditional areas of privacy.”

Of their installation, Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler wrote, “With backgrounds in curating and directorship, the Farmers control forms of collecting and display for public appreciation withing the institutional boundaries of art. There are acceptable and prescribed codes that determine curatorial choices. These codes… are not unlike similar types of socially acceptable codes we use to determine the character of our living space… Choices which might seem unique and personal are predetermined for us.”

“By exposing and making public the most private parts of a home, one places the invited guest in an uncomfortable voyeuristic position.”

In a 2005 exhibition America Starts Here: Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler, the Tang Teaching Museum (along with MIT, see below) presented work from the artists’ decade-long collaboration and published a catalog. Kate Ericson died in 1995. In 2006 the MIT List Visual Arts Center hosted the exhibition, and their website has much more information.

Lisa Hein, Trouble Growing Up, 1988, Instillation of an unfinished home, construction elements, household items, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Lisa Hein, Trouble Growing Up, 1988, Instillation of an unfinished home, construction elements, household items, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

1 am, more when I get up on Wednesday.

Cheers!

Hi again nice people, the angels are watching over me: wacky and inspired internet searches have brought me an September 10, 1988 LA Times review of this exhibition by Zan Dubin. Yay! Check it out here.

Artist Lisa Hein was hosted by architect Cy Madrone. Initially Madrone rubbed her the wrong way, but she was charmed by his self-built house, with its crazy unfinished corners and architectural disarray. It seems they discovered a mutual self-regard: Hein characterized Madrone and herself both as “contrary people” who received “ambivalent treatment from their respective families.” The art installation became a close collaboration between the two and a sort of portrait (as well as a self-portrait) of the homeowner.

David Ireland is too much fun. (Sorry that the picture isn’t in color.)

David Ireland, Untitled, 1988, Materials unknown, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

David Ireland, Untitled, 1988, Materials unknown, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Quoting entirely Ireland’s contribution to the catalog: “When Bodhidharma arrived in China around the year 500 and proceeded to the court of Emperor Wu of Liang, he was greeeted with great enthusiasm for the Emporer was an avid patron of Buddhism. He then asked Bodhidharma to explain the new religion and was told, “… it isn’t anything.” (Generalized from The Way of Zen, by Alan W. Watts.)

Master of the enigmatic, Ireland was. Those who visited The Art of David Ireland: The Way Things Are at Oakland or at the Santa Barbara Museum can attest thusly.

Jim Isermann, Untitled, 1988, Bean bag chairs, oil on canvas, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Jim Isermann, Untitled, 1988, Bean bag chairs, oil on canvas, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Dore Ashton on Jim Isermann’s installation, pictured above: “If Kosuth is scholarly in one way, Jim Isermann is scholarly in another, and somewhat humorous way. He has invited the spectator into a living room of another era: the pop era of the 1960′s with its deliberate vulgarity and its high-keyed shrillness; its studied love of the vulgar and its oppressive optimism. I could hear an invisible hostess in this visible reconstruction saying ‘well HI, come on in and smoke a joint,’ thrilling with her own daring rejection of her own middle class values.”

Joseph Kosuth, Modus Operandi (Santa Barbara), 1988, Fireplace, bookshelf, drawer, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Brian Lovett

Joseph Kosuth, Modus Operandi (Santa Barbara), 1988, Fireplace, bookshelf, drawer, Dimensions variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Brian Lovett

I quote once again from the helpful Dore Ashton on Kosuth’s complex installation”

Still another kind of didacticism enters the work of Joseph Kosuth whose theory of art must be assimilated in order to comprehend his piece. Long a practicioner of art-as-language, Kosuth’s written message in a psychiatrist’s bedroom, which he has altered by painting it totally black and arranging a kind of rigid symmetry in its accoutrements, as a spur to intellectual puzzling. His own modus operandi is to challenge the spectator with the riddle posed by his title (and framed, for he has said he would ‘frame’ the psychiatrist, and I presume there is no double entendre there) room in which the words dominate and set the objective tone.

Kosuth himself is somewhat dense and quotes himself from ‘No Exit,’ Artforum, March, 1988. (The full text of this article is available here from personalstructures.org. Also see La Biennale di Venezia, Italy, 2011, current exhibition.)

Erika Rothenberg, The Celebrity Simulator, 1988, Materials unknown, Dimension variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Erika Rothenberg, The Celebrity Simulator, 1988, Materials unknown, Dimension variable, Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Wayne McCall

Sneaking off into break-land. Enjoy.

Geoff 1:45 pm Wednesday

 

 

 

More of CAF “Home Show, Revisited:

CAF Part 1: Michele O’Marah – Video Portraits

CAF Part 2: Conversation with curator Miki Garcia

CAF Part 3: The Home Show in general – 1988, 1996

CAF Part 4: Florian Morlat – A Monument for the Dovers

CAF Part 5: Bettina Hubby for Home Show, Revisited

CAF Part 6: Jennifer West at Andy Perry’s house

CAF Part 7: Jennifer Rochlin for Home Show, Revisited

CAF Part 8: Evan Holloway: Art History = Successful Products + Time (a smorgasbord)

CAF Part 9: “Home Show²” again

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

A few words and images: Margie Livingston at LACE

Margie Livingston, Twenty Gallons, at LACE (installed in the archway btwn the front room and the main gallery)

Margie Livingston, Twenty Gallons, at LACE (installed in the archway btwn the front room and the main gallery)

Top right corner of Livingston's painting and of LACE's front room. Exciting angle!

Top right corner of Livingston's painting and of LACE's front room. Exciting angle!

I'm stuck on the top right. Must be a handedness thing.

I'm stuck on the top right. Must be a handedness thing.

Not an excellent shot, but this does give you the cross-section view. Possibly from this you can understand that Livingston applies her thick layers of paint (in red and yellow and white and black) to a slick surface the size and shape of  Home Depot 4′ x 8′ sheets of plywood. Then she cuts these into strips, like the ones you see here. In this case the strips were heat-applied to an aluminum panel.

Over the course of her residency at LACE Margie participated in several public conversations: at the reception speaking with those in attendance about her practice and on the following weekend LACE invited other artists engage with the installation and speak with her in a more intimate setting. Livingston mentioned work by Roy Lichtenstein. Not being familiar with her reference I spent time looking online. Below are images that I found.

Roy Lichtenstein, Three maquettes for three large scale sculptures.From left to right: Brushstroke, 1996. Brushstroke Group, 1983. Three Brushstrokes, 1984. Link to Roy Lichtenstein Foundation.

Roy Lichtenstein, Three maquettes for three large scale sculptures.From left to right: Brushstroke, 1996. Brushstroke Group, 1983. Three Brushstrokes, 1984. Link to Roy Lichtenstein Foundation.

Roy Lichtenstein, Yellow and White Brushstrokes, 1965 oil and magna on canvas. Link to City Review, Art and Auctions

Roy Lichtenstein, Yellow and White Brushstrokes, 1965 oil and magna on canvas. Link to City Review, Art and Auctions

Roy Lichtenstein, Red Painting (brushstroke) 1965

Roy Lichtenstein, Red Painting (brushstroke) 1965

I think Margie was speaking of the sculptures, all of these images help me make a connection. It seems that Lichtenstein was quoting from painting in this work. He ‘took’ a big, wild brushstroke – with all the freedom of gesture that these things imply to a viewer -  and rendered this/these in his own flat, highly technician-like manner, leaving me to wonder at the expressive ability of paint and also to imagine myself caught in a dilemma similar to one I described in talking about Kelley Walker’s work yesterday. What sort of meaning is held in a representation? Does an original exist, after representation such as this of Lichtenstein’s? I kind of hover there, looking and not quite understanding.

Partly this subject came up because Margie Livingston met with a conservator at the Getty – imagine the excitement for her! She spent several hours on that hilltop, talking with scientists about her paintings and ways time and wear might affect them. One Getty conservator took a particular interest and has requested an example of Livingston’s art to use as a test case for conservation of acrylic paint. Pretty cool, all around.

I’m gonna fly briefly. Going to Chinatown.

Back with more and more later.

Geoff

4 pm, back.

And back also to those brush strokes. The way that Margie Livingston uses them in this LACE installation they are objects unto themselves. They are several removes away from the act of painting, and flirt with sculpture but then veer off in a different direction. Here her objects play with the architecture in a nice way. They lay upon the surfaces, they make an unintentional but inevitable lattice-work pattern and the visible patches of wall and the shadows cast on these patches in an odd way diffuse walls as I pass through them. It’s a bit like walking through a halo. On the other hand, one participant in the talk commented that “it looks like the walls are packed with bacon!”

It happens that you walk through this installation directly into Kristin Calabrese and Josh Aster’s Unfinished Paintings exhibition. Coincidence is an amazing curator.

Cheers

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Reviews | 1 Comment

Something(s) I learned today

Apologies to Hüsker Dü for ripping off their title, or consider the title an homage to their spirit – whichever feels appropriate. (As a hero-worshiping queer, I offer you the very song live in Philly in 1983 via YouTube. Enjoy.)

Matt Chambers and Alexander Wolff are collaborating on an exhibition at Steve Turner, opening July 16. This I learned (more about) today. Shall I tell you stuff? Not now I shan’t! As I see it I have twenty-five days to tease you, to drop hints, upload the occasional image, and dangle a potent quote to two. How’s this one for example, “Our collaboration is only good because we fight so much. The paintings we delivered yesterday still look like they’re fighting!”

Max Ernst, Le Femme 100 Tetes, 1929, engraving and collage from a collage novel. Image from Kininklijke Bibliotheek, Nationale bibliotheek van Nederland

Max Ernst, Le Femme 100 Tetes, 1929, engraving and collage from a collage novel. Image from Kininklijke Bibliotheek, Nationale bibliotheek van Nederland

Quoting from the library’s website, “In 1929 Surrealist artist Max Ernst published the first of a series of collage novels.” and continuing, “This was to be ‘the ideal picture book of this age’, and the future was to leap forth from it. ‘Children’s eyes, wide with awe, that open like butterflies’ wings on the shore of a lake’. The time had now come - according to the introduction – for ‘the first hundred visions of fairies’. These prophetic words came from André Breton, the executuve director of surrealism.”

What a bizarre and lovely idea, that an anti-bourgeois, avant garde art movement might style their intellectual leader an “executive director.” Of course there is an overbearing quality to this also, as perhaps there was to Breton himself. There was an awful lot of exclusion among the members of that movement.

Cool images though. Link to bibliotheek website with additional images and informations.

Final page of the above, same source.

Final page of the above, same source.

Not meaning to, I have gotten hoovered up into the KB website and will share some of its glories with you. Yay.

Paul Valery, Le serpent, 1922, cover. (Hey - all you twenty-two year olds out there: snakeskin pants. Get some. Awesome pick up device.)

Paul Valery, Le serpent, 1922, cover. (Hey - all you twenty-two year olds out there: snakeskin pants. Get some. Awesome pick up device.)

Page 674 Les cahiers de Paul Valery, with "Chanson d'un serpent" (btw - after you pick that someone up it is nice to have something to talk about. Books, for instance.)

Page 674 Les cahiers de Paul Valery, with "Chanson d'un serpent" (btw - after you pick that someone up it is nice to have something to talk about. Books, for instance.)

Speaking of snakes, 2nd Cannons has a new book out. Brian Kennon: artist, publisher, genius. Master of eros friendly conceptualism. Hmm, thinking again of Breton and Surrealism, make that Brian Kennon, executive director of Penthouse Conceptualism.

Speaking of snakes, 2nd Cannons has a new book out. Brian Kennon: artist, publisher, genius. Master of eros friendly conceptualism. Hmm, thinking again of Breton and Surrealism, make that Brian Kennon, executive director of Penthouse Conceptualism.

BIG OLD HUGE LINK TO 2ND CANNONS PUBLICATIONS WHERE YOU MAY PURCHASE “ALICE COOPER / SUZI SIMPSON” FOR YOURSELF. MAKE CERTAIN THAT YOU DO.

IF YOU’RE ASKING ME, I’LL QUOTE IGGY POP, “BANG BANG – I GOT MINE!

YUP, AS ALWAYS THE FIRST COPY (IN AN UNNUMBERED EDITION OF 500) HAS MY PAYPAL ALL OVER IT.

CHEERS.

Need I, dare I, comment? Good job Brian!

Need I, dare I, comment? Good job Brian!

Alexandre Alexieff, animation for Gogol's "The Nose" with Claire Parker, 1963 from animationblog.org

Alexandre Alexieff, animation for Gogol's "The Nose" with Claire Parker, 1963 from animationblog.org

Maurice Roche, Claude Viallat "As you like it, Do it yourself" colophon, 1975

Maurice Roche, Claude Viallat "As you like it, Do it yourself" colophon, 1975

"Un conte à votre façon" - Raymond Queneau, John Crombie, Sheila Bourne

"Un conte à votre façon" - Raymond Queneau, John Crombie, Sheila Bourne

Christopher Wool, Vienna Secession - from Wool's website, which is linked

Christopher Wool, Vienna Secession - from Wool's website, which is linked

Stephen Prina, As He Remembered It, installation view, Secession current exhibition, linked

Stephen Prina, As He Remembered It, installation view, Secession current exhibition, linked

Ohh, a pinker Prina.

Ohh, a pinker Prina.

Kerouac, Orlovsky, Burroughs on the beach in Morocco, 1957, photo by Allen Ginsberg from allenginsberg.org which is linked.

Kerouac, Orlovsky, Burroughs on the beach in Morocco, 1957, photo by Allen Ginsberg from allenginsberg.org which is linked.

Kelley Walker, Whitney The Greatest Hits – How Will I Know: Arista 2000 (fourth iteration) installation view at Capitain Petzel June-August 2010, linked

Kelley Walker, Whitney The Greatest Hits – How Will I Know: Arista 2000 (fourth iteration) installation view at Capitain Petzel June-August 2010, linked

This time linked to Walker's source material for this project: Whitney Houston's 1986 video "How Will I Know" (only 4:24 out of your day - so worth it to watch!)

This time linked to Walker's source material for this project: Whitney Houston's 1986 video "How Will I Know" (only 4:24 out of your day - so worth it to watch!)

A bit of a quote from Christopher Bollen interviewing Kelley Walker in April, 2010 Interview Magazine:

“CB: And now you’ve also added Whitney Houston to your visual lexicon, reprinting every frame from her music video for “How Will I Know.”

KW: In some respects the piece comes from a very embarrassing place. It’s an embarrassing image, which I think prevents it from becoming so easily sublimated-it doesn’t play the sort of cool game like, say, [Jean-Luc] Godard as an image. It’s also a silly song. And there is something amazing and extremely tragic about Whitney Houston that is very American.

CB: When did she first creep into your work?

KW: I was doing a show at Power House in Memphis. It was two weeks before the opening, and they were becoming very nervous about my works. Two of the pieces were already purchased by museums and the insurance the gallery had to carry was really high.

CB: They were worried the chocolate would melt?

KW: There was no climate control, so they refused. So I basically made new work. I bought Whitney Houston’s The Greatest Hits and printed every video still.”

Christopher Wool, Untitled Robert Gober Collaboration, 1988

Christopher Wool, Untitled Robert Gober Collaboration, 1988

Wool again, Untitled, 1995 enamel on aluminum, 84" x 60"

Wool again, Untitled, 1995 enamel on aluminum, 84" x 60"

C. Wool, inc on 9th st 97 silvr gel 8.75x13.25

C. Wool, inc on 9th st 97 silvr gel 8.75x13.25

Another thing that I learned today: Christopher Wool takes awkward photographs of his work for his website and this ‘works’ better than pro-perfect shots. Good to know. Since representation isn’t the original (work of art), perhaps less attention to credibility of simulacrum will pay off. When a viewer has work to do in imagining, a better notion of the piece might be communicated? (It helps that Wool makes really super cool looking pictures anyway that he does it.)

Speaking of fruitful collaborations, as we were above with Chambers / Wolff. "Maybe I'll make some collages..... cuz Franz makes really good collages." "We had this discussion in Vienna and Franz turned it into a karaoke!" Quotes from linked vid of Kelley and West in 2009 chattering about 1999 exhibition. Great footage of opening performance, some good talk, a few brief annoying adverts. Kelley performs with Fan Club Orchestra. (Allow me to correct myself. NOT collaboration, rather JOINT WORK. Important to remember in the case of Mike and Franz as well as Matt and Alexander.) Watch.

Speaking of fruitful collaborations, as we were above with Chambers / Wolff. "Maybe I'll make some collages..... cuz Franz makes really good collages." "We had this discussion in Vienna and Franz turned it into a karaoke!" Quotes from linked vid of Kelley and West in 2009 chattering about 1999 exhibition. Great footage of opening performance, some good talk, a few brief annoying adverts. Kelley performs with Fan Club Orchestra. (Allow me to correct myself. NOT collaboration, rather JOINT WORK. Important to remember in the case of Mike and Franz as well as Matt and Alexander.) Watch.

brief break so you can look while i continue……

xo and soon

1:03, back.

A couple more Kelley Walker pix and then, well, more.

Kelley Walker, Nov-Dec 2009 installation view at Capitain Petzel

Kelley Walker, Nov-Dec 2009 installation view at Capitain Petzel

link to website

link to website

Nothing like a (pointedly) clean, white space

Nothing like a (pointedly) clean, white space

A friend recommended I check out the Kelley Walker exhibitions to which I have linked and from which I have grabbed images today. My tales of my Guyton/Walker mission of conceptual understanding tugged at his heartstrings. He alerted me to the press release for Walker’s 2009 show at Capitain Petzel. Which is here linked for those who are curious.

I think, or have thought, of this work as really, really dry. Plus it hurts me to consider, knowing as little as I do of printing processes. I tried in my “On The Road With Guyton/Walker” posts to get my little head around the ideas – bumpy was my road, but enlightening still. However, I got all caught up in the apparent cold-blooded smartness of what I was seeing.

The Whitney Houston work bumped my head off its holier-than-the-work perch and I had a revelation of sorts, well it went like this in my story-making mind:

“Gee, I thought his (Walker’s) stuff was all cold and conceptual. Irony laden, even. But look! Imagine yourself a queer boy, a teen or twenty-something, coming out into a world where Whitney’s ‘How Can I Tell’ is the song of the day, of your (and of my) kind. Young Walker-dude is smart to discern the falsehoods and emptinesses that are delivered by such promising images. (Images are at best and at worst advertisements, nothing more, he tells himself. Do not put feeling there nor accept meaning from there.) BUT, he also notices that along with/behind/after/inside (if you can desaturate the culture from her presence) the Whitney on the screen, on the floor, plastered in posters, dancing singing being black and fine and and and and just….. being used…. up – breaks his (my) queer little heart. ‘And there is something amazing and extremely tragic about Whitney Houston that is very American,’ Walker said in Interview.”

In his press release Walker notes the nascence of unregistered queer private dance clubs in NY in the 1970s. The progenitor of this model was “Love Saves the Day” at The Loft in 1970. He also notes (and further research helps me understand) the method of printing called CMYK, which makes use of a background such as paper (neutral or white in color) and applies colorants to subtract portions of the reflected white light creating (in our eyes or other detector) color. Whew.

Um, start with the white room of a gallery, add standing screens printed with colorants taken from video stills of your fave tragic singer’s MTV hit, arrange them in a fashion that pleases you (in the case of the CP show in 2010 these were arranged sequentially) add viewers, and you’ve got a portrait. If not of the singer then certainly of the method and means used to create her as a color saturated cultural substrate, from which that same culture would capture the reflected light. Soul-killing indeed.

I could go on about culturally normative queerness also being a soul killer, but I’ll let you think about that one on your own.

Link to Contemporary Art Daily 2010 exhibition  announcement with more info to add to CP press release.

Thanks friend for the recommendation.

Bye again.

Geoff

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Wanderings | Leave a comment

Available this weekend

Statler Waldorf Gallery have a show opening Friday, June 17. Over the City and Through the Woods, curated by Fritz Chesnut and Molly Larkey with work by Claude Collins-Stracensky, Bryan de Roo, Drew Heitzler, Oliver Irwin, Marie Jager, Gordon Matta-Clark, John Opera and Colin Roberts.

A note about Statler-Waldorf: S-W is an artist-run exhibition space located at 1098 W. Kensington Road, Los Angeles, CA, 90026, a private residence in Echo Park. We are open by appointment only. For more information, please email: info@statlerwaldorfgallery.com.

left- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Captain Bob Hyde Disappeared at Manhattan Beach, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.; right- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Natalie Wood Disappeared off Catalina Island, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.

left- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Captain Bob Hyde Disappeared at Manhattan Beach, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.; right- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Natalie Wood Disappeared off Catalina Island, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.

BREAKING NEWS: ZOE CROSHER, SAYRE GOMEZ AND J PATRICK WALSH III – GALA PREMIER AT LAS CIENEGAS PROJECTS, SATURDAY NIGHT!

Quoting now from a NoL report already underway:

“… he saw a dozen great violet shafts of light moving across the evening sky in wide crazy sweeps. Whenever one of the fiery columns reached the lowest point of its arc, it lit for a moment the rose-colored domes and delicate minarets of Steven Hull’s and Amy Thoner’s  Las Cienegas Projects. The purpose of this display was to signal the world premiere of a new exhibition. (…) Although it was several hours before the celebrity artists would arrive, thousands of people had already gathered. They stood facing the gallery with their backs toward the gutter in a thick line hundreds of yards long. (…) People shouted… there was a continuous roar of catcalls, laughter and yells, pierced occasionally by a scream. The scream was usually followed by a sudden movement in the dense mass and part of it would surge forward wherever the police line was weakest…. A young man with a portable microphone was describing the scene. His rapid, hysterical voice was like that of a revivalist preacher whipping his congregation toward the ecstasy of fits. ‘What a crowd folks! What a crowd! There must be ten thousand excited, screaming people outside LCP tonight. the police can’t hold ‘em. Here, listen to them roar.’.. It’s bedlam, folks.”


In point of fact my friends, I am cheerfully quoting from Nathanael West’s The Day of the Locust, the most fun you can have in 200 pages. I’ll continue briefly:

“New groups, whole families kept arriving. He could see a change come over them as soon as they had become part of the crowd. Until they reached the line, they looked diffident, almost furtive, but the moment they had become part of it, they turned arrogant and pugnacious… Once there (in California), they discover that sunshine isn’t enough. they get tired of oranges, even of avocado pears and passion fruit…. Their boredom becomes more and more terrible. They realize they’ve been tricked and they burn with resentment. Every day of their lives they read the newspapers and went to the movies. Both fed them on lynchings, murder, sex, crimes, explosions, wrecks, love nests, fires, miracles, revolutions, wars. This daily diet made sophisticates of them. The sun is a joke… (…) Nothing can ever be violent enough to make taut their slack minds and bodies.” (Don’t you love this sentence??????)

And what, one may ask, does any this have to do with Zoe Crosher, Sayre Gomez and J Patrick Walsh III? Lord in heaven, I don’t know. A scene just like West described above sprang into my mind when I clicked on the LCP website. Amy Thoner and Zoe Crosher – elegant and graceful in shimmering evening gowns,  the gentlemen in dinner jackets, all striding along a red carpet waving to the crowd, smiling and acknowledging the fans….

Go with it, I always say. Cheers.

And now a quote from Walsh and the venerable H.L. Mencken, provided for your consideration by Gomez and Walsh III as part of their joint statement:

The speed at which we comprehend the letter Z and assign its task, whether as a hairpin turn or the beginning of a snooze, presents us with countless direct possibilities for interpretation.  As the least used letter in the alphabet, Z can be compared to an ex-planet like Pluto, whose questionable stature seems to also walk the line between inclusion and exclusion. If you were to approach the letter Z at 500 miles per hour, what type of memory would you be left with as you pass through its jagged shape?
Language and speed are inherently connected. The rate at which one can receive messages is constantly increasing, coded characters continuously flung at greater invisible speeds. As I pass the road sign for ZZYZX at 100mph, I think briefly about a 1920’s spa, I listen to the music in my car, I text, and I smoke. All of this is liquefied in the desert sun. Is this so-called town at the end of the dictionary worth visiting? Maybe I would enjoy this experience more if my car was spinning seemingly out of control.            -J. Patrick Walsh III
“Poetry, in fact, is two quite distinct things. It may be either or both. One is a series of words that are intrinsically musical, in clang-tint and rhythm, as the single word cellar-door is musical. The other is a series of ideas, false in themselves, that offer a means of emotional and imaginative escape from the harsh realities of everyday.”
-H. L. Mencken

Marc Foxx, Next Season and Frances Stark My Best Thing.

Latned Atsar, Brevity of Names still is an opportunity for viewing and now I have images. Yay.

Frank Ryan, City of Los Angeles, graphite on rag paper. A quiet moment in a passageway to Ryan's installation of paintings, this drawing feels very alive. The paper is thick and textured and exhibits strength and fragility like human skin - the graphite rubbing is, well, rubbing - an action which can be interpreted in all or any of the several possible ways to understand this verb.

Frank Ryan, City of Los Angeles, graphite on rag paper. A quiet moment in a passageway to Ryan's installation of paintings, this drawing feels very alive. The paper is thick and textured and exhibits strength and fragility like human skin - the graphite rubbing is, well, rubbing - an action which can be interpreted in all or any of the several possible ways to understand this verb.

Frank Ryan's work in Sumi ink on yellow Japanese paper. All titled Mask.

Frank Ryan's work in Sumi ink on yellow Japanese paper. All titled Mask.

Standing alone, one of Ryan's Mask Sumi ink drawings.

Standing alone, one of Ryan's Mask Sumi ink drawings.

Ryan again, three small paintings about the childhood song, "How Much Wood Could A Woodchuck Chuck, If A Woodchuck..."

Ryan again, three small paintings about the childhood song, "How Much Wood Could A Woodchuck Chuck, If A Woodchuck..."

Don Suggs, one of his Feast Poles.

Don Suggs, one of his Feast Poles.

Don Suggs, installation view at Latned Atsar

Don Suggs, installation view at Latned Atsar

Gotta fly, dinner guests tonight.

have fun!

Geoff

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

The only place in LA to see Unfinished Paintings and have a critical dialogue about them

Pride of place to the master. So do you or don't you think this painting (James Hayward, unfinished painting Oil on canvas on mahogany panel, unsigned and undated 44" x 33") looks... finished? Do you suppose Hayward's paintings spring from his thigh like in a Greek myth? Eek. I want to see that!

Pride of place to the master. So do you or don't you think this painting (James Hayward, unfinished painting Oil on canvas on mahogany panel, unsigned and undated 44" x 33") looks... finished? Do you suppose Hayward's paintings spring from his thigh like in a Greek myth? Eek. I want to see that!

Good Lord my friends, I am losing track of important exhibitions, and so missing out on alerting you to GOOD STUFF.

Two are the many openings at LACE tonight:

Unfinished Paintings, curated by Kristin Calabrese and Joshua Aster. To my mind LACE is the only place that would be able to host this exhibition, which asks artists to share with the public works in progress. How tantalizing, and what a generous idea for an exhibition. LACE, with its history of supportive engagement with artists is just the place for a painter to feel the trust – and to inspire the audience to engage with respect. Awesome work Kristin and Joshua.

Lisa Adams, Joshua Aster, Nina Bovasso, Delia Brown, Kristin Calabrese, Sarah Cromarty, Sydney Croskery, Noah Davis, Gerald Davis, Mark Dutcher, Mari Eastman, Brad Eberhard, Bart Exposito, Michelle Grabner, Alex Grey, James Hayward, Salomon Huerta, Xylor Jane, Valerie Jaudon, Chris Johanson, Annie Lapin, Jose Lerma, Caitlin Lonegan, Dan McCleary, Shiri Mordechay, Loren Munk, Laurie Nye, Eamon Ore-Giron, Susie Rosmarin, Frank Ryan, David Ryan, Katia Santibañez, Kenny Scharf, Cary Smith, Linda Stark, Don Suggs, Mitchell Wright, and Brenna Youngblood.

Speculative, curated by Christopher O’Leary and Zachary Blas.

Casey Alt, Zach Blas, Jeff Cain, Micha Cardenas & Elle Mehrmand, Xarene Eskandar, Michael Kontopoulos, Christopher O’Leary, Claudia Salamanca, and Pinar Yoldas.

I do not know anything more about Speculative. I certainly will tomorrow after the opening tonight!!!

Loren Munk, Ferus Gallery Its Artists and North La Cienega Boulevard Oil on linen 42" x 36"

Loren Munk, Ferus Gallery Its Artists and North La Cienega Boulevard Oil on linen 42" x 36"

I’ve got some groceries to put away – more images in a sec.

Jeff Cain, El Camino Real, 3 channel video installation, 2011

Jeff Cain, El Camino Real, 3 channel video installation, 2011

Michael Kontopoulos, Water Rites, 2011

Michael Kontopoulos, Water Rites, 2011

Micha Cardenas & Elle Mehrmand, technésexual, 2009

Micha Cardenas & Elle Mehrmand, technésexual, 2009

Cary Smith, Splat #23 UF (green), 2011 Oil on linen 36" x 36"

Cary Smith, Splat #23 UF (green), 2011 Oil on linen 36" x 36"

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Charline von Heyl at 1301PE

Charline von Heyl "Blue Hermit," 2011 Acrylic and oil on linen 60 x 50 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles.  Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl "Blue Hermit," 2011 Acrylic and oil on linen 60 x 50 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Because it is in my mind right now, I offer you Tristan Murail, Désintégrations part one, Désintégrations part two and Désintégrations part three.

A thought, for those of you who spend time with Notes – do you remember the Joseph Beuys chimney sculpture image in the Florian Morlat post? Check out the yellow shape in the painting from Charline von Heyl’s new show above. To me it speaks of Beuys’ sculpture at the Kunstsammlung NRW in Dusseldorf.

I got an email yesterday announcing the extension through July 1 of Charline von Heyl’s exhibition at 1301PE. Good news.  Some of us have been waiting since her Spring, 2007 show Small Paintings at this same space. I recall that in ’07 when the angel and I climbed the stairs at 1301 we hadn’t heard of von Heyl and had no idea what to expect. Oh boy. We saw wonderful abstract paintings, paintings that seemed to be without a burdensome reliance on past abstract practice. I also didn’t get a sense that the artist was using any particular system to create these images; rather, she was responding to movements on the canvas: make a mark, respond, advance that thought, abandon it when it gets too strong, etc. Having seen the new show, I can look back and recognize that among the universe of possible responses in von Heyl’s painting language she includes a willingness to grab imagery from the world around her and uses them almost like another type of brush stroke or color choice.

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #8) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #8) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #5) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #5) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #11) oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #11) oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #6) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #6) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #4) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #4) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #13) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #13) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #3) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

Charline von Heyl, Untitled (L.S. #3) 2007 oil on canvas 18" x 20"

What does not show in the above images from Small Paintings are the many techniques for laying down oil paint – in places colors were forcibly mixed – to their obvious dismay – and so bubbled and festered, in places they looked as though the surface dried first and the underneath continued its chemical reaction, giving the final surface of the painting a wonderful wrinkly texture. So the colors, shapes, lines and real world references were fun to spend time with and also the surfaces of the paintings held a lot of material.

btw – and this is a good way to transition to the new show – during her recent talk at the Hammer von Heyl mentioned not favoring text in paintings. I cannot quote because my own notes are cryptic at best but paraphrasing von Heyl, “Text stops the looking,” and I take this to mean that when see I words in a painting I turn on the part of my brain that holds language, and this inhibits the part that simply sees without imposing understanding. Painters hate when this happens to a viewer. Take a moment to look above at Untitled (L.S. #5), see those dots? Do you also see how they imply letters and perhaps words? There is a drawing in the current show at 1301 that has a similar effect, although I do think the text is a bit clearer than in the above. The thing is, since the text is so… unclear or even only suggested, my reading of it as such remains tentative and, and… alluring. I don’t find or make a definition that stops me from seeing, rather I look with more intent and this causes me to spend more time with the work.

Charline von Heyl, Untitled, 2010 Mixed media on paper 26" x 21" Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Untitled, 2010 Mixed media on paper 26" x 21" Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Immediately after listening to the Hammer talk I visited the gallery again to see the show. I had much of what von Heyl said in my mind, and when I saw the drawing with French-looking text I thought to myself, “Hah! Got you now – you are using text. WTF?” Then I recalled her saying that she likes to mess with her own habits – or perhaps that she likes to mess with our habits of understanding her work. This helped me lose my gotcha feeling; and then last night in the car, telling David about the talk online I pieced together my theory about unclear text. Whatever the case, I have now been thinking about these two works for two weeks. This feels like a successful relationship btwn a work of art and a viewer. Yay.

I’m going to upload some of the images that von Heyl used as references. von Heyl talked a lot about looking, and she is a voracious viewer of images of works of art.

18th Century Russian Lubok woodcut, quoting from the source (which is here linked) ""The Horrifying and Terrifying Parable from the Mirror  A certain maiden concealed her foul sin of fornication from her spiritual father during confession and died with this sin. Her spiritual father began to pray to God and suddenly saw her sitting on a fiery dragon. On her eyes were huge toads, in her ears were arrows, great fire was burning in her mouth, vipers were sucking on her nipples, and the hounds of the inferno were biting her hands..." there is much more to this story, and just as juicy, after the jump. btw - check around on the site linked, there are amazing images of monsters from all ages. Neat!

18th Century Russian Lubok woodcut, quoting from the source (which is here linked) ""The Horrifying and Terrifying Parable from the Mirror A certain maiden concealed her foul sin of fornication from her spiritual father during confession and died with this sin. Her spiritual father began to pray to God and suddenly saw her sitting on a fiery dragon. On her eyes were huge toads, in her ears were arrows, great fire was burning in her mouth, vipers were sucking on her nipples, and the hounds of the inferno were biting her hands..." there is much more to this story, and just as juicy, after the jump. btw - check around on the site linked, there are amazing images of monsters from all ages. Neat!

Regarding the above, this link will take you to the Rollins College website with a history of Lubok woodcuts and many images. And this link will take you to the home page of Monster Brains image and info blog where I found the above image. Cool and cooler.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880-1938), Schlemihl’s Encounter with the Shadow, Colored woodcut on blotting paper, 57 x 41.7 cm, Städel Museum, Graphische Sammlung, Frankfurt am Main, From the series Pictures for Chamisso’s Peter Schlemihl (6 parts and title page), 1915.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880-1938), Schlemihl’s Encounter with the Shadow, Colored woodcut on blotting paper, 57 x 41.7 cm, Städel Museum, Graphische Sammlung, Frankfurt am Main, From the series Pictures for Chamisso’s Peter Schlemihl (6 parts and title page), 1915.

Charline von Heyl, Oread, 2011 Acrylic, charcoal, oil and oilstick on linen 82 x 74 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Oread, 2011 Acrylic, charcoal, oil and oilstick on linen 82 x 74 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Tormentor, 2011 Acrylic and oil on linen  60 x 50 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles.  Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Tormentor, 2011 Acrylic and oil on linen 60 x 50 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

“You discover a painting slowly, in steps. What you see first will never be what you see last and you will not refind your way – the path is already hidden once you follow it.” Charline von Heyl at the UCLA Hammer Talk on May 5, 2011.

When I visited this new exhibition the weekend of the opening I was a little unnerved – I have thought about the 2007 show for four years, only once having an opportunity to see another of her paintings in real life (at Oranges and Sardines at the Hammer) and what I was seeing now was so much not those paintings. Crisis time in looking for me. I did some homework, which I’ll make available to you:

Shirley Kaneda interviews Charline von Heyl in the  Fall 2010 Bomb Magazine. I shall steal excellent images from this site as they are quite, quite beautiful. The quote below is making reference to von Heyl’s 2010 exhibition at Friedrich Petzel Gallery:

SK That’s probably why there’s both authority and humor in your paintings, especially in your last show. There’s playfulness and daring, but you seem conscious of not making paintings based on that. They don’t come off jokey. They almost fight each other.

CVH Yes, I know, there is something irritating about the paintings in that way, and it comes directly out of my history. I would call it the cringe factor. And what made you cringe was procedure and material and imagery, not jokes or literal irony. The fact that the paintings made you cringe was their power. I tried to get there with the most awkward materials, goofy tricks and techniques, and with the dumbest messages. Always forcing things together that could not possibly work. It felt like bending bones. And I think that’s still in there even though my work has changed. But it wasn’t about being painterly or unpainterly, or abstract or representational; those questions just didn’t exist.

Charline von Heyl, Woman #2 2009 acrylic, oil and charcoal on linen 82 x 78 inches. In point of fact I hoovered this and the next image from Petzel Gallery, which is linked and well worth visiting for a wealth of images.

Charline von Heyl, Woman #2 2009 acrylic, oil and charcoal on linen 82 x 78 inches. In point of fact I hoovered this and the next image from Petzel Gallery, which is linked and well worth visiting for a wealth of images.

Charline von Heyl, Black Stripe Mojo 2009 acrylic and oil on linen 82 x 72 inches

Charline von Heyl, Black Stripe Mojo 2009 acrylic and oil on linen 82 x 72 inches

I listened to the Hammer / UCLA Dep’t of Art Lecture with Charline von Heyl, link here.

I recommend each of these resources to you, urgently. Kaneda’s interview is revealing of both parties’ thoughts and feelings on painting and von Heyl’s Hammer talk – being a lecture to art students – is chock full of tricks of the trade.

There is a fascinating extended conversation btwn von Heyl and a woman in the audience questioning von Heyl’s painting practice in terms of time and image gathering. To close her comments the unnamed woman noted that von Heyl’s paintings have an immediacy, a sense of urgency, as though they come together all at once. This is a spot-on observation and one that Charline von Heyl greatly appreciated. (Italicized portion above was added on Friday, June 17. My June 15 use of the word “urgently” nagged at me until I could re-locate my reason for using it. Credit to unnamed woman in the audience, whose thoughtful commentary inspired me and made me think.)

For me, information helps me in looking. Visual information as well as talking and reading. I’m glad I have initial reactions to work – good or bad – and I’m just as happy to be able to let them go and look again. Have a nice time when you visit (or revisit – as you should) von Heyl’s show at 1301.

Roberto Calasso, The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony link to interesting blog, text available from Amazon et al.

Aby Warburg – anything you can find. Link to Warburg Institute in London.

Charline von Heyl, Untitled, 2010 Mixed media on paper 26 x 21 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles.  Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Untitled, 2010 Mixed media on paper 26 x 21 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Untitled, 2010 Mixed media on paper 26 x 21 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles.  Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Charline von Heyl, Untitled, 2010 Mixed media on paper 26 x 21 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen

Ooh, another irresistible von Heyl quote, or paraphrase, “Color is always a whore. You never get through to anything else.”

Charline von Heyl at 1301PE, 6150 Wilshire Blvd., through July 1

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Reviews | 3 Comments

Around this berg – mid June

We went out with our friends Michael and Sirje Gold this weekend, to a-see what we could see.

We traveled first down Crenshaw, over the giant land-scar of the 10 and past The Living Room Bar with its bluesy rep and occasional night-time dj setup on the front sidewalk.

We were having a great time – we were laughing more than talking, and talking more shit than anything. (When equally cynical friends from the same small world get together, all the good gossip comes out!)

Back of Latned Atsar from the nice people at poketo.com, linked

Back of Latned Atsar from the nice people at poketo.com, linked

Frank Ryan, Putin on the Ritz, oil on canvas 2010, I can't give you the exact dimensions but pretty large. Maybe 60" x 48"?? I mention size because the rest of Ryan's work in the show is smaller - the size you can hold in your hand.

Frank Ryan, Putin on the Ritz, oil on canvas 2010, I can't give you the exact dimensions but pretty large. Maybe 60" x 48"?? I mention size because the rest of Ryan's work in the show is smaller - the size you can hold in your hand.

Left we turned, onto Jefferson and we parked behind 3222 Jefferson to see “Brevity of Names” at Latned Atsar. Frank Ryan, Don Suggs and Rob Thom have work in the show, I would have images but…. I am notoriously slow to remember to photograph things. Sad for me and for you. I am able to scope out a Frank Ryan image online, see above. This is kind of an all UCLA show – Suggs did both undergrad and grad there and Thom and Ryan are both UCLA MFA also. Probably not entirely coincidentally Nathan Danilowicz, whose space Latned Atsar is, got his MFA at UCLA.

The work? More about it in a while when I get images. Gotta return for ‘em. Show is up for another few weeks.

West we headed, Adams to San Vicente to La Brea to 3rd, turn right and park immediately. Dan Weinberg. Yes, he’s back, this time at 5658 West 3rd Street. Showing now are new paintings by Andrew Masullo.

Andrew Masullo, 5275 oil on canvas, 30" x 40"

Andrew Masullo, 5275 oil on canvas, 30" x 40"

Andrew Masullo, 5171 oil on canvas, 16" x 20"

Andrew Masullo, 5171 oil on canvas, 16" x 20"

(Weird the way these images upload with the white bottom border…)

Also Weinberg is still maintaining an office at 6363 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 103.

North again, on Fairfax to Martha Otero to see Adam Janes sculptures and drawings.

Adam Janes, installation view at Martha Otero

Adam Janes, installation view at Martha Otero

I’ve seen Adam’s candle sculptures in the past, at the Company in Chinatown, now seeing also the drawings there is an odd and happy relation btwn the two – both seem to be created through accretion and his work seems very playful. Do you remember the show “de Stijl Life” with Erick Pereira and Janes at China Art Objects last year? It was pretty neat, colorful canned fruit and vegetables on a wooden shelf unit, photographs around the walls – in addition to being beautiful this work, like the candles and the drawings, speak of their own making. Janes’s work suggests activity, social activity. At the Company, Janes’s candle installation made me think a party had happened  and that another one could spring up at any time. Same here with the work at Otero – as discrete objects (with wicks) the candles still seem ready for action. There is a drawing, it’s one of the smaller ones in the main room – I didn’t pick up a check list so I don’t have the title – this one is looser than the others by just a bit and seeing it I was drawn to look more closely. Almost sculptural, although framed behind glass. Without expecting it I thought of Joseph Cornell’s boxes and collage paeans to loves and moments caught just as they pass.

We did go almost all the way up Fairfax. To Sunset and Benevento and ltd los angeles.

I visited David Snyder’s exhibition alone on Wednesday. At the street I pushed the doorbell as is usual at Benevento, I did notice that the gallery front was different – it seemed to have wood framing and stucco with weird little windows and a wan planter. I noticed apples in the windows and figured that I was looking at art, not crappy architecture. The apple of someone’s eye indeed.

David Snyder, Put up a good front, but there's always that little voice..., building facade and sound. Photo by Josh White

David Snyder, Put up a good front, but there's always that little voice..., building facade and sound. Photo by Josh White

A hand pulled the door open a bit then disappeared, I grabbed the handle and pushed – hard. The door is much heavier than usual. Could be the extra build-out hanging on it but I like to think it was purposeful, you’ll get a better idea as we go along.

I sort of didn’t try too hard as I moved through the spaces, only enough to glance about, get my bearings and relax enough to let the work in. At the back I found a darkness with a video playing and a voiceover. It was like being at some affirmational psychologists office – the video showed a house front – maybe it was being pushed through a parking lot. Once in a while the shot cut and the house was burning. Back and forth, with the voice assuring someone (the artist? me?) “what you’re doing is normal, everybody else is wrong, you’re not out of touch, it’s not a mid-life crisis, you’re only thirty-one you’ve got a great career…” and on and on. I was in that place deep in our souls, behind the walls where we acknowledge a need for singly focused reassurance of our fineness.

David Snyder, Struggle With The Mess Age, mixed media and sound 140" x 171.5 x 45" (verso)

David Snyder, Struggle With The Mess Age, mixed media and sound 140" x 171.5 x 45" (verso)

Moving right along with a slight sense of discomfort I stepped one room closer to the door, noticing the cracks in the facade as I passed.

A womanly-sounding voice greeted me this time, “Let’s assume it’s okay to be alive together,” “Am I creeping you out?” “Why are you here, I can’t leave here, cross that street,” “I can’t afford to be tasteful so I remain indiscriminate…” So ok, is this a first date? is a hooker talking? a creepy psych lecturer? or, or, or is this the artist speaking to and of himself, or perhaps to the viewer? Each answer makes a cool kind of sense.

Next was a kind of foyer before the foyer. A plain house shape was behind me as I passed the gallery office and stopped in the entry. Another voice, extreeeeemely high pitched, digital screechy even. Only because Michael Benevento told me do I know that the voice is saying, over and over again, “Me me me me me…” and then I once again assayed the heavy and hard to manage door (make more sense now? ever tried to delve into your or someone else’s psyche?) and out to the relatively unencumbered air of Sunset Blvd.

Hmm, I’ve been at this too long today. Quittin’ time.

Returning soon, it’s 7:34 pm

Geoff

Published on by Geoff Tuck in Miscellaneous | Leave a comment