All notes with the topic Jason Ramos | Notes on Looking

Jason Ramos – Notes on Looking at New York

Field report: New York Jason Ramos April, 2012 Bushwick I met with artist Kevin Regen in a dark bar near the Morgan L train stop in Brooklyn called King’s County.  Every 100 feet in what has been referred to as “Greater Bushwick” there is a cool bar, a cool coffee place, a cool something.  Kevin ran an exhibition space in the basement at 1673 Gates Avenue (Genesis and  Lady Jaye Breyer P-Porridge’s old place) called Famous Accountants, currently on hiatus.  Like every conversation in NY, we end up talking about real estate.  I remark that people in NY talk about real estate the way others talk about the weather.  Richard Hell apparently said it first.  We are soon joined by Paul M. Nicholson, who was part of another now-on-hiatus space in the area called Botanic Gallery.  Paul and Kevin had never met in person before, but sort of half-knew of each other, in that familiar art world way of meeting personalities before meeting people. Also near the Morgan L stop lies the building at 56 Bogart.  Within it’s walls exist non-profit spaces, gallery start-ups, artist-run outfits, performance art spaces, studios and more.  Some of the people who run these spaces point me in the direction of some artists working in the neighborhood   All of those little spots every 100 feet that I think are so cool are there to serve the artists who live and work in this area – all but one of the studio visits I did while in New York were within a two block radius of each other here in Bushwick.  All the young artists...

Artist Project: Jason Ramos on Extra-studio Practice

As an artist, and one who identifies himself as a painter specifically, a lot of the usual can be assumed in regards to many elements of my studio practice. It is a solitary endeavor; a man in a room, making pictures. All the work produced is within the guaranteed context of the studio. Much of the art produced by contemporary artists everywhere is within this studio context– whether it be bad, good or great– and rarely ascends past it. How art gets out, how it jumps to other orbits, how it becomes part of a dialog, conventional wisdom dictates that this mystery is of secondary importance from the artist’s point of view as compared to the production of the actual art. If the defensive art student posture of “making art for myself” is as disingenuous as I have always maintained that it is, then the logical extension of the truth is to expand the priority of extra-studio  contexts from the starting point of the central priority of studio production. From this point, production can continue beyond creating art works to creating a venue, an audience, a dialog, a market, a pedagogy, etc. These contexts, unlike the solitary studio, must include the efforts of others by definition for those contexts to be understood separately from the art they surround. With each new orbit beyond the nucleus of the studio, an artist juxtaposes themselves alongside other artists to create these contexts. The skills and resources required to actualize an audience, a venue, a dialog, etc., are often delegated to non-artist roles, such as director, curator, critic, and so on. An artist...