All notes with the topic Sheridan Brown | Notes on Looking

Daido Moriyama-True Grit

  Born in Japan, he is a world citizen, through his peregrinations in urban surroundings, observing with his camera the meaner streets and the social changes in the second half of the 20th century. Two coinciding shows , one called “Fracture” at LACMA in the Japanese Pavillion and the other at the Stephen Cohen Gallery are showing the black and white photographs starting in the Sixties, up through  the present with new color work.  And Art Catalogues at LACMA has his new book. His immersion in the grittier aspects of  ”fractured” surroundings , absent any sentimentality, puts him in the company of contemporaries like Shore and Frank and Friedlander. There is a telling moment in  each of  his photographs that captures both the vulnerability and toughness required to survive city life.   http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/fracture-daido-moriyama http://www.stephencohengallery.com/scg-current-exhibition/moriyama.html ...

“The world is too much with us”-Charlotta Westergren’s paintings at Patrick Painter

William Wordsworth, a 19th century English poet, would have liked this show. Charlotta Westergren’s paintings are more than gorgeously painted images of sheep and birds. The paintings could very well  illustrate Wordsworth’s lines: “Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Little we see in Nature that is ours;/We have given our hearts away” Influenced in part by Flemish tapestries and Dutch masters, the artist makes reference to  the historical to bring the viewer into a finely observed, detailed and hyperreal  world in the present where survival, evasion, resistance, escape are all  there for the less faint of heart to take in. In addition to the paintings there is an installation titled “Fucking” which humorously celebrates Nature with scanned images of flowers from “Martha Stewart Living”. Artists like Jeff Koons and William Wegman frequently use animals to explore various aesthetic and social issues which art historian Tom Holert in his recent piece in Artforum  on photographer Josephine Pryde calls “the nastiness of cute.”   http://www.charlottawestergren.com/ http://patrickpainter.com/exhibitions.html ...

Rodarte, Prada and Post Empire

Can fashion be art? If  you ask the curators of museum shows lately they would say “yes – of course.”  We are not talking about lifestyle manufacturers like Ralph Lauren and Karl Lagerfeld. We mean those two sisters from Pasadena who have set a small media bonfire in the fashion world and Miuccia Prada whose company is listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange. Rewind to the beginning of New York Fashion Week showing Fall 2012 RTW (ready to wear clothing that will be in the stores in September). Fashion Week is a bi-annual ritual of the fashion world that lasts nearly a month and takes the glamorati  – that big ball of  fashion goo – from country to country,  New York to London to Milan to Paris  in an unlikely marathon  in the service of predicting what you will be buying, wearing , coveting, reading about and  red carpet watching  in six months. This obsession for one who is no longer part of this world began for real when I started  streaming live the New York shows. I was already interested in Rodarte as artists since MOCA gave them a show at the Pacific Design Center last year  based on the Black Swan film  for which they designed the fantasy costumes for Natalie Portman. In addition, LACMA gave them a mini show based on the Fra Angelico in the Renaissance collection of the museum.  But can the clothes  that are made  to be worn serve as art as well? Also, there is a show at the Met this spring of Schiaparelli and Prada assuring the status of the...

“An embarrassment of riches or just embarrassing?” by Sheridan Brown

The only person I know who can turn back time is Cher. -Anonymous Sunday I attended a sold out performance of Eleanor Antin’s   re-creation of a 70’s performance of “Before the Revolution”.  This was the last of the 10 day cycle of performance pieces presented by LaXart and The Getty Research Institute celebrating Los Angeles  performance artists between 1945 and 1980. The main radical thread of Antin’s play is that an African-American ballerina longs to perform the lead in the Ballet Russe’s Swan Lake.  In  the 1970’s–not a chance. Today? Obama is the President.  An American, David Hallberg, dances with Ballet Russe. Watching the performance, the structure and language rang true but the concept was so much a part of another time. Does the reinvention of these past performances teach us through art anything about where we as a people have been? Do  performances out of the past  trivialize themselves? Both of these things are possible, and even likely, given the circumstances of uncritical acceptance that currently prevail. We are in a nostalgia boom. Nostalgia, that longing for a past that was somehow better, deeper and more meaningful is a hot ticket. Certainly Americans  are choosing to feel  good while facing hard questions, favoring films this past  year like The Artist and Hugo amid the economic perils at hand. But remember that angst-ridden Existentialism was born in France.  Disneyland and its iconic Main Street are so  upbeat which is an optimistic part of the American character. The performances that I saw last week at The Hammer, The Rose Bowl and The Standard Hollywood garage were entertaining 2012 re-imaginings by...

The Sheridan Brown Files

Dear Sheridan, Thanks for these photos! I love them. I mixed them with several of my own. You may think me crazy, but do you mind if I imagine you dressed like a spy, in a belted overcoat and a low brimmed hat, surreptitiously snagging pictures of your prey and dashing off emailed dispatches to homebase from the trenches? You see, I am stuck inside here behind my computer, and I need some fantasy to liven my days. This is a great way to start, please send more as you get them. And if you get any naughty ones, we’ll do a special “News of the World” memorial issue of Notes! We’ll make them gasp, and stretch their eyes. (Laughing) All my best, Geoff (someone) Interviewing Lauri Firstenberg at Art Los Angeles Contemporary A (normal-ish looking) couple looking at Tony, a tattooed wonder in a photograph by Zack Balber. Fredric Snitzer Gallery A Kenneth Tam video installation at ltd Los Angeles A sculpture by Cristina Lei Rodriguez. At the Brand New Gallery, Art Los Angeles Contemporary A sparkly Mel Bochner A video piece by Gabriel Stellbaum, set in a deserted parking space “a Dantean underworld”. At the bar at Art Los Angeles Contemporary on Thursday afternoon Bunny Jurriaans and Isha Welsh at VSF for Fiona’s opening Connor configuring one of her walls. Performance? Sculpture? A performative space occupied by charismatic objects? Go see for yourself, open through Feb 12 at VSF with curated performances on weekends. detail of a Kori Newkirk piece at LM Projects, Newkirk has an upcoming artist book project with Lorraine Molina. Keep you eyes open!...