All notes written by Geoff Tuck | Notes on Looking

…turn left in 1000 feet. Destination will be on your right. (Notes on Looking email March 17, 2014)

Notes on Looking Contemporary Art in Los Angeles Be aware of the size and weight of your vehicle when you cross or enter traffic. http://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/cdl_htm/sec2.htm   TUESDAY   ZIPPER HALL VICKI RAY NEW TERRITORIES PIANO SPHERES  More here: http://pianospheres.org/   Ray’s selections for the evening’s recital include:   Christopher Cerrone – Hoyt-Schermerhorn Joseph Pereira – Six Settings for Solo Piano (world premiere) (Piano Spheres Commission) Donnacha Denneby – Stainless Staining (for piano and soundtrack) George Aperghis/arr. V. Ray – Recitation 9 Vicki Ray – The Waking (audience favorite from Spring 2013 poll) Vicki Ray – Jugg(ular)ling   “A pianist with a sparkling tone and a gripping rhythmic sense, Ray makes everything she touches a pleasure to listen to.”  (Mark Swed, LA Times)   “Vicki Ray is cinnamon toast with sriraca. I love love love hearing her play.” (Anonymous)   Remember, folks, that’s http://pianospheres.org/ WEDNESDAY   HERE, THERE STEPHEN COLLIER NATALIE JONES ADAM JANES Stephen Collier, Untitled, oil, enamel plywood, sheet rock, xerox, rubber eggs 60×48   ARTIST CURATED PROJECTS http://artistcuratedprojects.com/   https://www.facebook.com/events/610460262352370/ THURSDAY   DOWNTOWN PHOTOROOM INAUGURAL GROUP SHOW   From the slide series Biosphere II © Markus Krottendorfer, 2013   ONE SHOTS AND IMAGINES KAUCYILA BROOKE CLEGG & GUTTMANN MARKUS KROTTENDORFER SONIA LEIMER SHARON LOCKHART JOSEPHINE PRYDE MANDLA REUTER STEPHANIE TAYLOR    ORGANIZED BY CHRISTIAN MAYER   http://www.downtownphotoroom.com/    https://www.facebook.com/pages/DOWNTOWN-PHOTOROOM/178749198981011   SATURDAY JENNIFER SULLIVAN BIG GIRL PAINTINGS     5 CAR GARAGE   http://emmagrayhq.com/2014/tomorrow/jennifer-sullivan-march-22nd   https://www.facebook.com/events/368070069998923/   SUNDAY   Put on your best hat and wind your clock.   http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/Wind+Your+Clock/59N6Bn?src=5  ...

jaywalk: Heidrun Holzfeind, Michael Hieslmair, Christian Mayer, Deniz Sözen, Johannes Zotter

jaywalk Heidrun Holzfeind, Michael Hieslmair, Christian Mayer, Deniz Sözen, Johannes Zotter MAK Center Artists and Architects-in-Residence Opening: Thursday, March 13, 2014, 7-9 PM Exhibition: March 14-16, 2014, 11 AM-6 PM Mackey Apartments and Garage Top 1137 South Cochran Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90019 Please join us as Group XXXVII of MAK Center Residents present the results of their six-month stay in Los...

Yann Novak “Doppler.Shift” at Commonwealth and Council

Foreward I walk as though entranced, when I walk in a familiar place. Chapter One In my mind, I hear laughter down the hall; I remember the last opening I attended, and the one before that and the one before that; I think of the afternoons when I’ve climbed the stairs and traversed this hall alone, and with David; I think of times I’ve spent here with Young, looking at art and sharing an experience with whoever was visiting. Here is where I prepare myself for what lies ahead; here is a space of cleansing and of conscious breaths and of quiet, zen-like pleasure. Here is a space of leaving. This darkened space, this truly liminal span of corridor is rich with history; it encompasses anticipation and intellectual pleasure and drunken promises and love. My body makes echoes here; as it moves it animates the space. The hallway returns this favor by animating my memory. A faint scent of cigarettes and dust and plaster, and the feel of air on my skin as it passes, completes the magic. Yann Novak has done us the service of honoring Commonwealth and Council’s nearly mythological hallway with two works of art. A quiet drone composition plays, and it alters as I move, tones growing more and less resonant. I hear, or I imagine I hear additional “instruments” entering the aural space of the pulse (bell-like, organ-like), changing it, and then dissipating into the new, jointly created pulse. Walking the length of the corridor again, I find two distinct compositions; the second sounds rounder, and hollow and like it is made from human voices in a polyphonous...

Mary Hill in “SomeTimeApart” at Commonwealth and Council

Mary Hill shows two bodies of work in SomeTimeApart, titled Figure Drawing I through III, and Power Bottom I through IV, along with a group of give-away Risograph prints. (Risograph is an ink-based duplication system using a master, or stencil.) The prints reproduce in 11 x 17 inch format side by side pages, possibly from a figure drawing book, of a male and a female figure. The woman is nude, the man wears a white jock. The models are posed on rectangular and cube-shaped bases. The effect of these photos is something like illustrations from Joy of Sex: anodyne, yet erotic with sweet charm; human rather than idealized; on the verso are printed quotes, such as “I know a power bottom when I fuck one.” and “And you can never touch a girl in the same way more than once.” Figure Drawing I, II, and III use these Risograph prints with added color Xeroxing. Here, a pair of hands is photographed while holding the initial prints, and the hands are emphasized through repetition. These images are layered in a way that makes me think each is done with a separate pass through the Risograph printer. The layers make a direct reference to time: each passage through the cylinder is indicated. The multiple presence of the hands refer to another sort of time, to the time in my head, where I imagine the artist holding and considering the pages again and again; I can also imagine myself, looking down and finding my hands doing the same thing. This is conceptually sweet in a way that mirrors the sweetness of the original images. Relative innocence as a strategy feels right for these post-jaded times. I can imagine...

Between thought and expression, lies a lifetime—John Pearson considers “James Welling: Monograph”

Between thought and expression, lies a lifetime. – Lou Reed (1) Monograph is a survey exhibition of the photographer James Welling’s work from the late 1970s to the present.  My interest here is to consider the artist’s photographs as well as the installation of the exhibition at the Hammer Museum through photographic associations, excerpts of published interviews with the artist, and various, sometimes contradictory, ideas about photography.  Writing about photographs I find myself preoccupied by the world – what the artist makes of it with the photograph, how the photograph informs that relationship.  And this connection built from the index, record, trace that is a photograph is where I find myself negotiating meaning. The photograph, inherently mechanical, inherently systematic, is unique in its alignment with a single unruly and impulsive sense: vision.  And vision’s association with one’s attention suggests that looking at a photograph is seeing the photographer’s attention. You look at what was looked at by the artist.  The photograph offers attention, consideration, and discovery of the artist’s surroundings.  It manifests perception and makes a sense of the world.  I’m thinking about a photography rooted in observation. “No.  I think that, in general–and this includes a lot of what I see in Chelsea even more than what I see from students at Yale–there’s a failure to understand how much richer in surprise and creative possibility the world is for photographers in comparison to their imagination.  This is an understanding that an earlier generation of students, and photographers, accepted as a first principle.  Now ideas are paramount, and the computer and Photoshop are seen as the engines to stage...

Artadia awards exhibition at LACE

And the award goes to… is much more a presentation of work by artists with something in common than it is a curated exhibition. This is an observation, and not a criticism; the show’s purpose is to orient viewers with the work of a group of grant winners. It’s a sparsely hung show; the combined three rooms of exhibition space hold three video installations (two projections, and one – a film – on a monitor), four modest-size drawings, one sculpture and two easel painting sized wall sculptures. A wall projection screens two videos in a loop. Cayetano Ferrer, Vishal Jugdeo, Nicole Miller, Stanya Kahn and Kerry Tribe are the inaugural awardees of Artadia’s expansion of its granting mission. Now covering seven locales in the US, Artadia gives unrestricted awards and other support to artists. You may find out more about Artadia here http://artadia.org/ Kerry Tribe makes demands upon one’s attention and upon one’s patience with her films. The experience of her work can be trying, and it can also be intriguing. At LACE Tribe shows a short film titled The Procedure, which is a kind of period piece / drawing room comedy (without laughs) / and Structuralist exercise. As the film opens, the characters, who seem to be a family, are hushed; the colors are drab, not in a dingy way, but in a way that speaks of modesty and hard work and “no time for all that,” where “all that” is happiness. There is tension, and maybe fear present among the family. Or maybe they’re simply not very demonstrative, maybe they’re English. They are gathered behind a dining table;...

Fairfax and the Movies by Paul Pescador

This summer I did a screening in Los Angeles at Cinefamily, a movie theater on Fairfax between Beverly and Melrose which screens independent/cult films. (Paul Pescador, 1 – 9, 2011-2013, presented at CineFamily in cooperation with Human Resources, August 4, 2013) A few years back, before Cinefamily opened, the venue was The Silent Movie Theater, which would occasionally screen old silent films, oftentimes with a live musical accompaniment. I first heard the story about Silent Movie Theater a year ago from a friend over brunch. She started the conversation with, “My friend was shot in the chest in that theater”. I paused and looked up from my burrito. “So my friend worked at the concession stand at the Silent Movie Theater, and the owner of the theater, who was secretly gay, his lover hired a hit man and tried to kill him off.” “Why?” “I guess he had a lot of money and wanted it. The theater was a fun side project for the owner, as he was incredibly wealthy. My friend was a family friend of his, she was in high school and would work the concession stands wherever they did screenings.” “So what happened?” “The lover hired a hit man. The agreement was that the hit man was to shoot the owner and take out anyone else who was close by, making it seem like a robbery. My friend was working the concession stand. She was shot, but didn’t die. “What happened to the owner?” “Oh he died.” “Jesus! How did they tie it back to the lover?” “Well, my friend was ok and was able to identify...