All notes from Archives | Notes on Looking

AT MOS

  ¶   there is always an invisible force even when alone – together even when alone – alone there is always an invisible force conducts our every impulse i think of you ceaselessly ceaselessly you are large and vast as the ocean itself by itself shapeless without a creature inside, not a single cell, one molar tooth of matter other than water hydrogen – oxygen – hydrogen atoms a t o m s a t m o s a t  m o s   ¶1   and this, multiple lacerations, this stings like a mutherfucking skate, the kind that cuts across the ocean bottom like butter before it’s dipped in a secret batter and fried golden delicious to a crisp, served with apple compote at my favorite star restaurant — classy, keepin’ it world class, this skate a substitute for the real thing, the sting out of my price range. but it’s easy to be a cry baby over it, get it, tiny dings incur tiny debt (too small for the naked lens to kaptcha), it was only the cat’s miaow, if only i’d gone to the bank, was my only security the shore line or was it consolation, your voice only carries across the crowd when the dunes, as soon as day break, begin as the next cycle of elections begin cuts back to corral the fallen wishy washy morale, sooty tree, company, decree what greed? — i’ve none. i blink and you do not believe, deep (breathe, hon) diving in the sea bell bottoms, slight aberration, bronzen kiss the brazen sun: it is an equation and...

Phoenix Rising, Part 3: laub, me, and The Revolution (The Theory of Everything) A conversation with Emi Kuriyama, Jennifer Moon and laub

  11/22/2015 3:22PM in Culver City Emi Kuriyama: We can talk about whatever, but . . . hmm . . . how did you two meet? I heard you met at laub’s opening (click here). Who made the first move? laub: I did! Jennifer Moon: You did?! l: because I was like, “I’m in The Revolution (click here)” JM: Oh, yeah yeah, but you didn’t ask Young [Chung] to introduce us. l: No no, what happened is the night before when I was installing, Young had this sit down with me and said, “You know, you’re part of the family now and that means you have to know the other artists that are here,” so that night I looked up everybody on the list of Commonwealth and Jennifer was the one I remembered. Jennifer. The Revolution. I had that in my head. JM: The water thing. l: Yeah. Jennifer was bartending and I went to get water, but then— JM: We both reached for the glass at the same time. l: Yeah yeah yeah. EK: Wait, for real? JM: Yeah yeah yeah. [LAUGHTER] JM: So that was funny, and I poured some water and smiled and— l: And then I came back and we had that conversation. JM: And Young was like, “Oh, you haven’t met yet. laub, Jennifer. Jennifer, laub,” and he ran away, and laub said he was into The Revolution. EK: That’s a really good pick up line. JM: Yeah yeah. I know, right! And then he messaged me the next day saying something short like, “Your life force and energy has impacted me. Would like more.” And...

Richard Hawkins, It’s gonna be… Oh, clay?

Examination of Test # RH0815 As I entered I found her in the supine position. Upon first inspection it appeared her hands were tucked underneath her lower back, yet it was soon evident her upper limbs had been completely removed. Her skin was dark, thick and rugged with a charcoal green complexion. Her expression was placid, peering off as if fixated on a non-existent point in the room. Her hair was styled in three dramatic classic barrel curls, two stretched out from the sides and one glorious cresting wave on top of her head. Orange hair also extended from below her blue breasts. A phallic-like organ protruded from her abdomen and rested between her buttocks, which were inverted to her front. A peculiar powder grey skull with cavernous eyes was attached to the bottom of her tibias. She was a truly fascinating specimen of Dr. Hawkins. It is said that the French poet Isidore Isou, after observing the post electroshock drawings of Artaud, would follow Dr. Ferdière into the night begging him to perform the controversial, and arguably debilitating, treatment on him. Dr. Ferdière, also a poet and friend to many surrealists, aimed to “remove the various delusions and physical tics” Artaud suffered from; he believed that the late playwrights’ habits of crafting magic spells, creating astrology charts, and drawing unsettling images were symptoms of mental illness. Today, many professionals would say that Artaud suffered from schizophrenia, and that Ferdière, suffered from jealousy. Richard Hawkins’ exhibition “New Work,” at Richard Telles Fine Art and Jenny’s, excavates the post electroshock drawings of Antonin Artaud, and continues the surrealist longing for the complex incongruity...