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“The Object is Null,” an exhibition by Kimberly Hahn at Design Matters Gallery, by Daniel Rolnik

I care about people. It’s kind of weird. But I think that in order to truly appreciate art you must also care about the people who create it. And what I love more than anything about today’s age is that access to these people, artists, is so easy – all you need is a Wi-Fi connection. A new skill has arisen, which is the ability to get positive feedback from artists when it’s infinitely easier to send messages and inversely impossible to reply to them all. And this skill is exactly what the curator at Design Matters Gallery, Bianca Collins, has been equipped with. Collins saw artwork on the website ARTslant that she liked and contacted the artist who created it, Kimberly Hahn. Within a day or so, Kimberly, who is based in Santa Barbara, responded. This is something that is profound. It’s reflective of the way we process information, with our fingers tumbling through pages of data on Facebook or Instagram at breakneck speeds. Except, the communication between Kimberly and Bianca broke down the wall of anonymity.   What I particularly like about this story is that it shows you can take power away from the establishment. Yes, you, sitting and reading this article, can do whatever you want without following some old rule of how to do things. You don’t need a degree in curatorial studies, or to spend your life savings flying to parties around the world, you can sit in your bedroom with a computer and put together an exhibit that’s truly wonderful and connective in a brand new way. So now the real question is,...

Scary Movies, by Paul Pescador

There is a moment when the summer heat finally calms and fall sneaks up on you. You feel it in the morning, cool and foggy. Different from other parts of the country, the shift in season is more subtle in LA. I notice it in the light as the harsh summer sun softens. I go to Target with Daniel and the back-to-school stuff has been put away and all the Halloween costumes and decorations are now front and center. Glittered bats, fake blood, plastic pumpkins. Fall is here. I hate when it gets dark early, I sit at my office, it’s only 5pm and the daylight is gone. As someone who grew up in Southern California, in the desert of the Coachella Valley, I recognize fall by the crispness in the air, and a wet mildewy smell that reminds me of pumpkins. I grew up in the middle of nowhere; the closest house was a few miles away. My family lived alone on a one-acre plot surrounded by tumbleweeds. When I was a child, no one came to my house at Halloween, as it seemed too scary; and not Halloween scary but murder and rape-y scary. The house was pushed back on the property, and you would have walk up a long, low-lit drive away in order access it. This need for isolation came from my father, who felt that it was the only way for him to find peace and quiet. The rest of us were not as excited by this. In middle school my mom and I would spend weeks decorating the front yard with Halloween decorations,...

these things (Notes on Looking email from November 26, 2013

notes on looking contemporary art in los angeles SIMONE MONTEMURNO WHEN YOU SIGN YOUR NAME    November 22 through December 28 at metro pcs,  Los Angeles Chinatown 402 Ord Street, 2nd Floor, Suite D. 323-388-5650    http://metropcs.la/   Montemurno’s exhibition opened this past Friday, November 22. The gallery is open Saturdays, from noon to six pm, and by appointment. I recommend Montemurno’s exhibition to you. Indeed, having seen a show she curated at Sabina Lee Gallery, and work of hers at Untitled Art Projects…. I exhort you to pay When You Sign Your Name a visit. Have fun. Say “Hi” to Matt and Ian. photo by metro pcs   RACHEL ROSE SITTING FEEDING SLEEPING   I remember a nudibranch, it was plump and pretty and it glowed; it lived in darkness at the bottom of the sea, where every creature is blind.   I remember a bird, or possibly some other animal, who did not care that I existed; even though in my mind I stood close by and cared so much.   I remember a scene showing peacocks in a zoo, and a voice explaining zoo animals’ lives – or perhaps I’m mixing the film with a news story I heard later. No matter. This scene reminded me of the work of a friend, and so it connected directly to my life; whether by a wrong association or a long acquaintance doesn’t matter. I wondered about the ability of this film to open life to me, to open my life to me; this work of another, an artist with different goals than I, employing different means, and following different...

Have a little now, and SAVE THE REST FOR LATER! (Notes on Looking email from November 12, 2013

notes on looking contemporary art in los angeles   TONIGHT TUESDAY: GLORIA CHENG PIANO SPHERES   http://pianospheres.org/   ALSO TUESDAY: DAVID WELDZIUS 45 YEAR LAPSE   https://www.facebook.com/events/668586616495101/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming   Reception: Tuesday Nov 12 7-9pm  September 9 – December 22, 2013Here is one trajectory. It begins with a creation myth and ends with speculation: In 1826 Nicéphore Niépce prepared, exposed, and processed what is believed to be one of the oldest surviving photographs, A View from the Window at Le Gras. In 1871, forty-five years later, a coalition of working class Parisians organized a socialist democracy that governed France for just three months. When the Paris Commune went under siege in May, the daily newspaper Le Temps stopped production for thirteen consecutive days. In 2012, interested in photojournalism’s role in shaping historical perceptions of uncertainty and upheaval, Weldzius used a utility knife, wheat paste, and dismal socio-economic news culled from the daily paper Le Monde to construct a series of collage works. Weldzius made these works while he was an artist resident at the Terra Foundation for American Art in Giverny, France. He affixed the collages to the walls of his studio and photographed them periodically—often late in the day, in soft, Impressionistic light. Incidentally, entrepreneur Daniel J. Terra, the founder of the Terra Foundation, amassed his fortune after patenting a quick-drying print ink. Terra’s ink was first applied to the pages of Life, an American picture-magazine that debuted in November 1936. In 2013, Weldzius printed five photographic documents of his newspaper collages at Otis College of Art’s photo facility. For his exhibition “45 Year Lapse,” Weldzius has displayed his photographs...