All notes from Archives | Notes on Looking

16 years

It’s nice being with someone for sixteen years. I can see through time to when I met him, and beyond to how I imagined him to be then. And he does the same. Growing old together has a grace and a generosity that I appreciate. Whatever else it is, and it is so much, love is this....

On a Sepember afternoon, the wind

“I grew up in Santa Ana.” she smiled at the incongruence of names, the placid town and the powerful wind. “Can you smell it? Memories.” “My mom’s curtains would blow, fiercely. Books might fall from a shelf. You went there then too, didn’t you?” This of a past that we shared in an unsavory discotheque. “It was 1982, and 3; I was thirteen.” I saw her for a moment, at 13 and at 43: I saw the inspired yet clumsy attire of a girl, and a white mini-dress, still inspired, business-like now, felicitous in her grace. This vision hovered between us. No, not between, it joined us – outside of time, I think. “That book you gave me,” now she’s nodding to a friend, though her mind is focused elsewhere, “funny that it is blue, like the sky. Three volumes. But you can’t see the wind. I’ve set it on a shelf, before a sculpture.” Here, she smiled again: another book, I thought, another shelf. “I never read it in school, and,” gesturing around the gallery, “well, I will someday. That story of the madeleines…” For Amy Thoner, on September 27, 2013, at...

Native Strategies and Notes on Looking: A conversation

June 13, 2013 Geoff Tuck: I’d like to find a way to begin our conversation. I often find myself in a state of wondering when these projects are inaugurated with a person… It seems that no matter how much homework I’ve done on a subject – no matter how much preparation we’ve done – I begin in doubt: that I may leave something out, that we offer too little background for people to understand, that I’m insufficient to the task of exploring our subject. Brian Getnick: I totally understand that feeling. I find the beginning of any writing project unnerving in that I am afraid that I’ll never cover all the bases. Ultimately I think writing is about surrendering to the fact that you will never cover all the bases, and you will never engage all of the relevant discourse that floats around your subject, nor be as good as the writers you adore and who crowd your head. In the end, you have to just start something, anything. Geoff: I’m curious about your approach to defining the terms of Native Strategies. You are offering the experience of performance to people, you are engaging artists and writers to consider the practices you showcase in a series of publications, and – which I find terribly important – you are seeking to include performance practices that are not immediately recognizable as art, or that are not considered by the gatekeepers of the art community(ies) as art. Such practices range from queer theater to ethnic dance to…well – you tell me. At dinner we talked about a few territories you’d like to...

LA Movies by Paul Pescador

It’s the weekend before Labor Day, the last few days of summer. My summer began late as I spent much of it finishing up a film, which was a collection of shorts that I have been working on for the past few years. Now that this project is completed, I have been spending much of the month of August watching movies. It’s so hot outside, and it is the easier to find a cool dark room to escape into than try to get work done. Not much goes on in late August; my day job has slowed down: a few emails trickle in here or there. Also most of the galleries are officially closed. Rather than spending the end of summer by the pool or even on vacation, I’m in bed watching films with a rather nasty cold. Everyone I know is sick. This illness seems to be passed between friends, similar to a kale salad at a picnic. I struggle to get out bed: used tissues are piled on the floor at my feet. I sit with a laptop and a stack of dvds. Different from a winter cold, which is so much about shivers and trying to stay warm, a summer cold is all congestion as one struggles to breathe and make one’s way through heat with 90 degree humidity. All the sheets have been thrown to floor as I can’t seem to cool down.  My house doesn’t have AC, so instead it’s filled with small fans and all the windows are open. We have dishes of water everywhere for our two chihuahuas, and we constantly take...

Miriam Dym – Means of Conveyance: A letter to Young

“Hello” Hey, Young! We’re out here in Parkfield, crunching chips, quaffing 805’s and talking about art. We were unpacking our library and we found this Miriam Dym publication from POST. We thought of you. This is a pretty neat little book! I’m glad you mentioned Miriam when we stopped in last week. I’ll send you some shots of the pages. Your relentless friend,...

L.A. CITY COUNCIL PASSES KEY MURAL ORDINANCE

Let’s celebrate!  Ten years later Los Angeles is finally getting its murals back now that the new mural ordinance has been passed.  I am excited that LA’s walls will be covered once again but also curious (and a bit worried) how the registration fee and the 45-day waiting period will affect spontaneous murals and street art.  Or perhaps it won’t… Time will tell. Below is The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles’ (MCLA) Press Release about last week’s vote from the Council. On Wednesday, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, Los Angeles City Council passed a new mural ordinance for the city by a 13 to 2 vote, thus ending a decade during which Los Angeles enforced a mural ban on private property. A second reading and vote next week will complete the formal process of official passage. The ordinance provides for regulatory oversight of new murals, as well as official recognition of already existing murals. The ban of the last decade was a product of a 2002 court nullification, on First Amendment grounds, of the City’s Comprehensive Sign Code of 1986. The new mural ordinance requires the registration of a mural with the Department of Cultural Affairs in order for it to enjoy full rights under the law.  This registration will include payment of a registration fee, completion of a form, and a 45-day waiting period to allow members of the public to review and comment on the mural as a matter of required procedure. Once installed, a mural may not be removed or altered for a minimum of two years except under particular circumstances.   Under...