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Nowhere to Run, Nowhere to Hide, a weekend show in Berlin

  Making art requires the translation of an idea – consciously or unconsciously – away from an unmediated expression of self and toward an externally determined presentation. But, currently, I see conditions in the contemporary art world requiring that the authentic self, the spirit of the artist’s idea, must remain largely undercover – or negotiate itself out of existence. Yet, as in the words of Martha and the Vandellas – sometimes there is nowhere to run, and nowhere to hide; this imperative to dissemble can be problematic for an artist who is trying to maintain the germ, the spirit, and the rebel that is central to their art. Everywhere I go Your face I see Every step I take You take with me, yeah I know you’re No good for me But free of you I’ll never be, no Each night as I sleep Into my heart you creep I wake up feeling sorry I met you Hoping soon that I’ll forget you Nowhere to run Nowhere to hide Got nowhere to run to, baby Nowhere to hide ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ Nowhere to Run, Nowhere to Hide is: David Bell, Anthony Bodlović, Asher Hartman, EJ Hill, Brianne Latthitham, Paul Outlaw, and Geoff Tuck The exhibition is at Infernoesque, Die Lustige Grube (a summer-long series of exhibitions in Berlin organized the members of Infernoesque and curated by international artists). The exhibition hours are Friday and Saturday, August 9 and 10, Friday from 6pm-10pm, and Saturday from 1pm-7pm. On the lawn, under the trees, in the park at Leipzigerstrasse 40, Berlin. Performance by Paul Outlaw, written and directed by Asher Hartman, Friday at 8:00...

Karl Haendel and Geoff Tuck, thinking about fatherhood

Geoff Tuck: Hi Karl. I had lunch with a friend recently, Michael Powell, and he is a new father, too. He and his wife, Natilee Harren, had their baby several months before you and Emily had Hazel. Michael was telling me about the experience of childbirth for him, and that during the experience he got a sense of mortality that he hadn’t expected, or maybe one that surprised him. Thinking about it, I guess in the moment of new life one would naturally become aware also of the fact of death, but it is not something I’ve heard people talk about. Karl Haendel: I had a similar feeling. Although I’m not sure I would call it an awareness of mortality – that’s too cerebral. It was the terrifying fear of death. Of losing somebody you love. At one point when labor was going pretty good – Emily was in the bed and the contractions were coming every two minutes – I left the room to go down the hall to the bathroom, and when I returned she was wearing an oxygen mask and had an IV in – the baby needed more oxygen, it was nothing serious and rather routine – but this medicalized situation that Emily was in really freaked me out. I had a flashback to when my mother was in the hospital; my mother had cancer much of the time when I was growing up, and she died when I was 19. So I spent a lot of time in hospitals with a woman I loved who was wearing a mask and hooked up to an...

Written for speaking – John Pearson and Geoff Tuck before Commonwealth and Council

August 01, 2013, 9:22 AM Hi Geoff, I haven’t heard any feedback about the questions I sent, so here’s one more you can answer at Commonwealth and Council. Is there a role for critical writing that is not encouraging, not in agreement/alignment with the art – what would be called negative criticism. Would this improve the public dialogue, and an artist’s argument? Politeness seems to make artists submissive with the market, perhaps when there is one rich collector defining value – monetary value. This goes on while aesthetics and ideas languish un-articulated. August 01, 2013, 10:31 AM Hello John, Yes. I like this question because it makes me uncomfortable. I think I read two questions, although I’m not sure. (in response to your later email, when you questioned the appropriateness of this question, I find this an appropriate area of inquiry for the event Commonwealth and Council.) I do think negative criticism can be helpful – to the artist, and to the public conversation – if the writer is committed to the task and honest about her or his motives. And if the reading audience has a commitment to exploring ideas. Having said this, I would say that valuable criticisms will be those aimed at helping an artist reach a perceived goal, and also refutations by the critic of that perceived goal, perhaps where the critic disagrees with the artist’s ideas. The first critique is best conducted in private, with the artist, in my opinion. The second, the critique of ideas, is to be public, and is the purpose of criticism. Such a conversation about ideas is essential to...