right about now (email newsletter 09 July, 2013)

Sacred and Profane: 14th Variation, 1999, 13 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches. Water-based medium on canvas.
(Loosely quoting from a text by James Hayward that is available in the gallery.) “I never would have guessed when I was young, that I would become enthralled with Italian Rennaissance Painting. This transcendence did not come about because of any education, or book reading, or by the influence of a teacher, but through direct experience.” In the late 1990s, James Hayward went to Rome and saw paintings. Variations on the Annunciation is Hayward’s report on that visit.
Variations on the Annunciation, installation view. (r) Botticelli Variation, (l) Caravaggio Variation
“I was told to like Michaelangelo and (fill in the blank with any heavy-hitting Rennaissance painter of your choice), but the paintings that really bowled me over were those by Titian and Botticelli and Caravaggio.” Hayward went on to comment that he had not known it was possible to achieve the psychological depth and emotional intimacy and physical space in a two-dimensional area that these painters achieved in their master works.
I had my own moment of transcendence looking at Hayward’s Annunciation and Sacred and Profane paintings.
Sacred and Profane: 4th Variation, 1999, 7 7/8 x 11 7/8 inches. Acrylic on canvas.
Hayward makes clear in his text that he respects his antecedents, and also he respects his viewers. Looking closely at the paintings, one finds an area of great complexity where three and more colors occupy a single brushstroke, in another place several brushstrokes twine into a plane of single hue. When one steps away to look again, these decisions by the artist accumulate so that they become diffuse, until they hover on the edge of comprehension, like the hundreds of decisions of everyday life (each one a singular incident) that melt together into a life.
Variations on the Annunciation: Caravaggio Variation (detail), 2000-2003, Acrylic on canvas mounted on wood panel
For example, one small canvas panel is thick with reds and oranges. The surface of this one gleams as with a waxy surface, and there are impressions into the paint. Glancing upward, I notice irridescense that I had missed before, lovely lavender and aqueous green in the burnished-silver of the wood panel body of the painting. A nearby panel seems to depict wave forms, in deep blues. Because of the waves, I wonder if Botticelli’s Annaunication has a sea in it? But I suppose I am thinking of the story of Venus, with her half-shell by the sea shore… And it seems right that I think of bodily love in the presence of Hayward’s paintings – which present color physically, and yet make clear that color exists as an idea (like love). Hayward’s is essentially a conceptual practice, wrapped in lovely robes.
All James Hayward images are courtesy of the artist and Anna Meliksetian Gallery with MJ Briggs.
Die lustige Grube, location.
Infernoesque’s Die lustige Grube (The Merry Pit) in a park in Leipziger Strasse, Berlin. Architecture by Alex Gross.
Visitors peering into “The Pit.”
Die lustige Grube, again.
In the darkened heart of Die lustige Grube. (cue wicked laughter)
The party continues all summer. I’ll be there in August. Cheers: http://www.infernoesque.de/index.php?id=2
Phoned-in self portrait. Work by Robert Medina from the recent Outpost/Armory Monster Drawing Rally. Intervention to drawing by Young Chung, David Bell, Inmo and me. Installed at Commonwealth and Council.
Artist David Bell puts his things in order Tuesday and Wednesday till 8:00 PM, at Dream Home Resource Center, the current Hammer Project.
Olga Koumoundouros takes the “saint” out of social practice, and she places herself – the artist – on the muddy ground of confused intentions with the subject and the viewer; in this way, her practice foregrounds the human heart and its many and conflicting desires. Koumoundouros’ pracitce combines self interest with social practice and self critique with institutional critique; her work acknowledges and defuses the elitism that often goes along with art.
Like Beuys’s coyote in a dog park, Bell contributes his own hapless humor and self doubt to Olga Koumoundouros’s project.
To date, we have published the Parkfield Review #1 and #2. This month, we begin work on the Parkfield Review #3. I encourage you to take a look and see what wonders you might expect in  November. And, if you feel interested to buy copies of #1 and #2, I certainly understand! They are remarkably appealing!
Right About Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Check It Out Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Right About Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Check It Out Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Right About Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Check It Out Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Right About Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Check It Out Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Right About Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Check It Out Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Right About Now

The Funk Soul Brother, Right About Now

’bout now

’bout now

’bout now

Bye.

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