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Mike Hernandez – Who Killed the 28?

In the midst of life, we are in death. All of our celebrations, for the end of this year and for the beginning of the new one, are tempered by our experiences of loss. I think this is ever the case, and I think this year particularly so. It is customary in this season to make resolutions for self improvement and a better world. Mike Hernandez, in his video Who Killed the 28?, poses questions for each of us as we think about the future. “Who Killed the 28?” (In the style of Bob Dylan’s “Who Killed Davey Moore?”) -written in memory of the 28 victims of the shooting rampage in Newtown, Connecticut. One verse for every victim. ___________________________________ Who killed Allison? Why and what’s the reason for? Not us said America we protect our flesh and blood we’re the best in the world freedom for every boy and girl more murders happen in a week here than other countries have all year this is such a bitter pill was it destiny, was it God’s Will? Who killed Ana Grace? Why and what’s the reason for? Not me said the government I am here to represent voting is your only voice A or B, make your choice we can do what we please special interest, wine and cheese you will always have the poor the blame is shared, what’s mine is yours Who killed Avielle? Why and what’s the reason for? Not me said the taxpayer I earned my money, fair and square dropping rates for 50 years is getting close to zero fears government is not your friend...

Yunhee Min – at the Hammer Museum and at LACMA

  Installed on the ceiling perhaps twenty feet above me there is a single, continuous rail on which hang nineteen double-sided fabric panels. These panels are in several colors: reds, blues, yellows, etc., and the values range from deep and rich to bright; the panels range in width from approximately 4′ to 8′. I recall that some panels change color from front to back, or inside to outside. The installation of Yunhee Min’s For Instance suggests a flattened half oval against the north window wall of the UCLA Hammer Museum’s upstairs, open-air patio. This interior loggia serves as a passage between wings of the building and often hosts large-scale artworks, and also, as on the day I visited, musical and performance groups. Min’s installation brings color to this impersonal space, and intimacy and play. Within its curtained arc there is a sense of remove, as in a cloister, as well as the potential for revelation, for drama – even lacking a physical audience the space between two panels can become a proscenium for an imagined play. As I moved among the panels, which are regular in shape and size, and are taller than my body, and so feel architectural and columnar, I had a sensation that is familiar from past experiences with Min’s art. My memory became engaged in a way that is both active and contemplative. I wanted to consider what I had just experienced, as I moved from one spot to another, with what I saw in the moment; and I wanted to look ahead, holding both thoughts in my mind to sort of preempt memory by...

A letter written while looking: Sarajo Frieden at the LACMA Art Rental and Sales Gallery

Dear Sarajo, I saw your paintings at LACMA today (Friday, December 7). They look as though you make decisions as you go, perhaps as though if you make a mark you regret, you find a way to use the mark to good effect, maybe through repetition, or by abandoning a pattern you were developing. (regret is too strong a term to use in art making, but I can’t think of another) In Untitled, No. 217, while the scored paint on the right stands out because of its texture, it does not feel contrived or self-conscious. It looks, well – not impulsive exactly, but as though you had to do it. (apply emphasis to “had”) This is true also of the oblong half ovals that overlay the (roughly) geometric pattern at the bottom. (Are you familiar with the writing of Alfred Jensen? Your paintings remind me of his. I also think of Steve Roden looking at your paintings. Not because I sense a working system behind your choices, but because your choices are idiosyncratic in the way both these artists’ decisions are.) In this piece, as in several others, you set up a horizon incident (or two, or more) and you play with it, and with my expectations of it. I begin to look for bilateral symmetry – you lead me to expect this – and I find instead near repetitions, moments that remind me of each other, but are altered through some process of your design. I mean design here not in the sense of making a pattern, but intransitively, as to make a plan; I see your intelligence...

“and the full scale model” Wednesday night at Public Fiction

and the full scale model a group show at PUBLIC FICTION Featuring new work by: Anna Helm Chris Hanke Eli Joteva Brandon Jardine Pilar Brooks Brynne Quinlan Jackie Dejesse Timo Yates Emma Sheffer Woodrow Clark Daniele Morkel link to facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/events/458099380892575/ JOIN. THE FRAY WANTS YOU. (Images have been provided on December 13.)...

Monte Vista Holiday Raffle!

Come to the Monte Vista Holiday Raffle fundraiser benefit for Monte Vista Projects Friday night, Dec 7th 8-11pm 8pm doors open, 9pm tickets are picked at random free admission, raffle tickets are $10 apiece, buy as many as you...

15 December at Cirrus: Contemporary videos in a context of existentially confrontational prints by a previous generation. Of course you should think about Paul Schimmel’s “Painting the Void” at MOCA, we all should. Yes.

Role Play December 15 – February 2 a video screening with works by Mark Briggs Erica Eyres Alex Gross Anna Mields Jennifer Moon David Snyder and Patricia Valencia Plus: Images in Peril December 15 – February 2 Images in Peril is a group show with Joe Goode, Charles Hill, and Marvin Harden. The exhibition consists of prints that provide evidence of the tension between the artist and the picture plane. Whether the surface was altered by means of armed aggression, burial or subtle abrasion, the works in the show act as remnants of both a personal and material conflict. Cirrus Gallery 542 S. Alameda St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 Tuesday- Saturday 10am- 5pm (213) 680-3473 [email protected]