All notes from Archives | Notes on Looking

On the Rocks (by Nathan Danilowicz)

Already, much has been written about Michael Heizer’s “Levitated Mass,” that behemoth of an outdoor art installation made possible by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and it hasn’t even been completed. If you haven’t heard about Heizer’s project, you might have been living under a...

David Richards: architect, tree hugger and husband. Gilroy: a small city that spends BIG on books. Yay.

Everything herein is reposted from and links back to the Gilroy Dispatch. Thanks to them. I’m proud of you David. You are kind and smart and you do good things. Green, and the envy of all other libraries Solar panels, energy-saving lights, weather controlled thermostat make library most eco-friendly building in Gilroy Story Comments Image (10) ShareShare Print Create a hardcopy of this page Font Size: Default font size Larger font size Previous...

visitors from new york mentioned some things and i carried the ball (george segal, larry johnson, leo ford, lance and donald moffett)

This from Canyon Cinema: House of the White People George Kuchar | 1968 | 17 minutes | COLOR | OPT Rental Format(s): 16mm film, 24 fps Cast: Donna Kerness, artist George Segal and his wife Helen, Walter Gutman. Having nothing to do with racial tensions, HOUSE OF THE WHITE PEOPLE is actually a chunk of film removed from a bigger chunk called UNSTRAP ME. It is a documentation of George Segal creating the basic elements for one of his statues preceded by rare glimpses into his own private museum. Donna Kerness serves as his live model. Walter Gutman sits on a chair and walks around a bit, being that he produced the film. Helen Segal, personifying the ageless saying, “behind every man there stands a woman,” stands behind her man and also stands in front of him occasionally. The film is a unique invitation to view the hidden rituals of a famous artist and his infamous model, half naked, snowbound together on a lonely farm, with a silent wife and a notorious guest. Rental Fees Fee 16mm film, 24 fps $68.00 Rent this...

Narcos, Feral scapes and Art on the Radio: Edgardo Aragón; “West is More”; Xavier Cázares Cortéz; Radio Break: Pedro Reyes, Brandon LaBelle, & Arnoldo Vargas

Many Mexican artists are tackling the theme of drug trafficking in their work, often by portraying the violence and aggression in ways that are sensational and direct.  One artist who is attempting work in the complete opposite way is Edgardo Aragón, whose first solo-exhibition in the US is on view at Cal State LA’s Luckman Gallery, in collaboration with LAXART. Aragón, who is from Oaxaca, Mexico, takes on the subject of narco-trafficking in a way that is subtle and simple.  The solitary landscapes, which reoccur in his vidoes, indirectly portray the cruelty of these impoverished narco-agricultural regions. The exhibition consists of a video-trilogy.  In Efectos de Familia, several screens show kids, or chiquinarcos (children recruited by the cartel) in what seem like theatrical staged maquettes.  The kids are playfully imitating what the narco does to his victims.  In one video, a little boy stands in the middle of a desolate, dusty landscape.  A truck goes around him in a circle creating a huge dirt cloud, which is meant to suffocate;  this act reveals an actual form of torture.  In a second video, two young boys imitate a violent encounter between two enemies; one boy opens the truck door and pretends to shoot a gun, the other boy pretends to get shot over and over.  There is no blood, no bullets just two kids mimicking a common spectacle.  In another video a boy’s feet are buried in the sand.  He stands in the middle of a deserted, dirt road.  A truck’s lights blind as it then races toward him, in what looks like a game of chicken.  The truck violently...

“I’m clean man, I’m clean!” (The Paranoia of Time at Carter & Citizen)

I wonder about Craig Doty’s photos at Carter and Citizen, I mean, I’m predisposed to appreciate printed photographs anyway. I like that I can see an edge and that it appears in relief against the backing. Light, as it reflects off the surface, or diffuses across more matte finish photos, is also nice, and I always imagine holding the picture I am looking at. Doty’s choice of things to picture incline to the inscrutable yet recognizable: a few flowers, the bare suggestion of a proscenium arch limned in a dark place by orange lights, several nudes of the same young man – one with the model’s arms raised and exhibiting the residue of antiperspirant; all these seem drawn from a specific life – if not the artist’s then perhaps one that he creates, or that I, in response to his work, create for myself. I feel personally responsible to these pictures. This effect might be manufactured, but it rings true, especially when I inquire and Whitney Carter shows me the entire portfolio of twenty-two pictures. As I hold the card-stock mounted Instamatic photos and stack them after looking, I find flaws both in the processing and in the way this inexpensive camera accepts light – halos appear, and parts are whited out. This all feels honest to me rather than precious. I don’t think that I am fetishizing an outmoded technology here – I think I am looking at good photographs. But as I said, I wonder.  Barring evidence to the contrary, I’ll trust my instincts. (Check them out and let me know what you think.) The walls of...

. You’re in good hands with Allstate (don’t worry, as a title this doesn’t make sense even to me)

I’LL BE YOUR MIRROR March 17, 2012 – April 15, 2012 Opening reception March, 17,2012 – From 7pm – 10pm Hannah Greely, Doug, 2004, polyester resin, paint, glue, dirt, 3 x 3 x 9 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Bernier/Eliades Gallery Athens Artists in exhibition include: Slater Bradley, Juan William Chavez, Nick Crowe and Ian Rawlinson, Jay Erker, Gunther Herbst, Pablo Helguera, Hannah Greely, Robert Goetz, Charles Ray, Darren Harvey-Regan, B.J. Vogt. Curated by: Daniel McGrath. Nico belted out: “I’ll be your mirror” in the eponymous Velvet Underground song, and continued by promising to “reflect what you are in case you don’t know.” When Nico made the offhand offer: ” Lou, I’ll be your mirror” to songwriter Lou Reed, she inspired the formation of an iconic rock lullaby. It was a gesture that quickly turned sour. Recording the song, Nico broke into tears after repeated bullying from the rest of the band, before she achieved the correct deadpan pitch. Indeed, the Teutonic chanteuse and Lou Reed fell out soon after, although the band’s replacement singer for Nico uncannily imitated her unique performance for many years. In turn, the album “The Velvet Underground & Nico” endlessly emulated by adoring punk, indie, new wave and goth bands, has become a mirror that refracts endlessly through the decades inspiring generations of musicians. The exhibition I’ll Be Your Mirror explores the condition of mimicry and the appearance of the doppelganger. The double, look-a-like, impersonator and mimic all hold a capacity to destabilize us on a deep-seated level. They can be a harbinger of evil, but also have been rendered as a being...

In other news (and on weekends, too)

Quickly now, and in no particular order: Matt Siegle presents at The Blue Shanty, with work by John Burtle, Young Chung, Ian James, Zac Monday, Meghann McCrory, Brica Wilcox and with a reading by Margaret at 8:30 PM. Friday, April 20 from 7 to 10 PM at 411 Isabel Street, 90065. This is the third part of “Before I move out at the end of the month, art every Friday.” Only one more Friday to go, so plant on...

Sa chambre de la folie: Samara Golden studio visit

Samara Golden returns texts as I watch her ghost painting in a mirror. I glance behind myself to where she sits with her phone and her position matches the reflected video. I recall what she said earlier: “Time doesn’t really pass, it melts all around us.” …lightening flashes with messages from cursed lands as the rain falls, sounding on an invisible roof. The rain is louder now. I think that in the light of this SoCal day, the power of this piece (made as it is for the night) isn’t lost but made more harsh, less subtle perhaps and colder –  like Liz Taylor blurry with fat but beautiful, whispering poisonously to her husband, “Getting angry baby? Getting angry yet? I hope that bottle was empty, George – you can’t afford to waste good liquor.” Mirror books reflect other realities, perhaps from some 6th dimension (if there is one – in her preamble to my looking, the artist blushed and remarked hopefully of her essay on space and time, “…this is only my theory – it isn’t real.”) There hangs a necklace at the back, made from blue-green gemstones, wrought copper and beaten silver. It looks like a last piece of jewelry that one removes to cast aside before a party, so not to be overdressed. The goddess Maya might have worn such gems. (Of course the sculpture is made of painted Rmax insulation, copper tubing and tin foil. Ah, but the gems are painted also on the back – kudos to Samara for follow-through!) I am conscious that my footsteps are soiling her lovely thick-pile white carpet. This makes me nervous and ashamed. (Sometimes the dirt of...

Daido Moriyama-True Grit

  Born in Japan, he is a world citizen, through his peregrinations in urban surroundings, observing with his camera the meaner streets and the social changes in the second half of the 20th century. Two coinciding shows , one called “Fracture” at LACMA in the Japanese Pavillion and the other at the Stephen Cohen Gallery are showing the black and white photographs starting in the Sixties, up through  the present with new color work.  And Art Catalogues at LACMA has his new book. His immersion in the grittier aspects of  ”fractured” surroundings , absent any sentimentality, puts him in the company of contemporaries like Shore and Frank and Friedlander. There is a telling moment in  each of  his photographs that captures both the vulnerability and toughness required to survive city life.   http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/fracture-daido-moriyama http://www.stephencohengallery.com/scg-current-exhibition/moriyama.html ...