All notes from Archives | Notes on Looking

Kelly Kleinschrodt “distant already” at Carter & Citizen

Hello Kelly, I enjoyed your show at Carter & Citizen and with luck (and a little focus on my part) I will make it back for a performance. I have to say that I was taken aback by the action of the breast pump. Um, I never supposed it would so… arousing and even otherwise attractive. Arousing first because the video so closely matches the movement and look of man, but – and this is the curious part – still kinda sexy once I recognized what was going on. Nice! Thanks for confusing me! Can you tell me some of how you relate this work to music? Does the action dictate a score? Can a score direct the action? Finally, congratulations. Good show. Hi Geoff, Your questions have been really great prompts for me to connect some dots throughout my recent history- so thank you for providing this platform! So, how does this work relate to music? Discussions with Natilee Harren, a close friend, have been hugely influential. For the last 6 years we have been discussing her research on Fluxus scores- from Glass to Brecht- and I became interested in these histories and artists. In fact, my first public performance in 2007 was Brecht’s “Drip Music” (“a source of water and an empty vessel are arranged so that water falls into the vessel”). My interpretation of the score had my body, facedown, on cool concrete, breathing/drooling into a pillow until the “water” covered the surface area of my face (about 15-20 mins). And, interestingly enough, just last week during a studio visit with Natilee, while looking at several...

Stadtler Waldorf Gallery at Co/Lab: Art and Conversation in the Public Square

On August 30 I received an intriguing invitation from artist/curator/community builder Molly Larkey: “Hi! I am writing to invite you to participate in a project that I am hosting at the Statler Waldorf Gallery booth at the Art Platform Los Angeles art fair this September 30th – October 3rd.  My idea is to provide a respite to the mind-numbing, visual overload of the art fair experience, by bringing into the booth a more informal, intimate, and intellectually stimulating social interaction, such as those that (hopefully) take place at my gallery/house. To this end, I am inviting individual artists and/or curators to come to my booth and be available for discussion on any topic of their choice, for a predetermined amount of time (say an hour).  I will have a couch and comfortable seating in the booth, and I will be making available a list with the names of the artists, what will be discussed, and when they will be in the booth.  This is NOT a lecture or a formal presentation, just an opportunity to come sit with me and whoever else is there, and chat loosely around a topic that is interesting to you.  It doesn’t have to be about art, though it can be, and the topic can be as vague or as specific as you like. Queer content is MUCH encouraged! I have invited you because I think you probably have something awesome you want to chat about!  Please let me know if you are interested, what you might want to discuss, and when you might be available to come by, so I can start to...

Monte Vista Projects at Co/Lab: Black Is The Color Of True

Monte Vista Projects: September 24th – October 22nd, 2011 Art Platform, Co/Lab: September 30th – October 3rd, 2011 Opening reception at Monte Vista Projects: September 24th 2011 7pm-10pm Lara Bank, Chris Bassett, Frank Chang, Roni Feldman, Joe Goode, Dan Hockenson, Candice Lin, Jay Lizo, Nikki Pressley, Colin Roberts, Anna Skarbek, Steve Steinman, Devon Tsuno, Tyler Waxman   Monte Vista Projects, in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-198 and Co/Lab, is pleased to present ‘Black Is The Color Of True’. Inspired from Joe Goode’s Nighttime series, painted in the 1970’s, ‘Black Is The Color Of True’ presents artists using a predominantly black palette in their work. The Nighttime series are monochromatic black canvases painted in a loose network of brushstrokes, with cuts into the surface of the canvas revealing the wall color, which starts to create beautiful tension between foreground and background.   The selected artists in this show have various perspectives in what the color black means to them. Some of the artists used the Nighttime series as a point of departure to create their works, while others are working with the color in their individual ways. Lara Bank’s Black Hole paintings are “scientifically” black, they suck our retina into the deepest shade of blackness.   Roni Feldman makes beautifully subtle black paintings of crowds. Candice Lin’s graphite drawings address black from a racial point of view. Colin Roberts makes carefully tiled polycarbon glass tile pillowcase sculptures. Dan Hockenson will do a performance using black coffee serving it “cowboy” style.   As examined in the catalog ‘Black Paintings’ (Stephanie Rosenthal) which featured artists work from the...

It begins

Hi friends, Any of you in Los Angeles and most of you anywhere else know that the Getty Institute’s Pacific Standard Time opens this weekend. A grand, searching fabulousness in the city without a past, PST documents and presents for our viewing art created in LA between 1945 and 1980. Attendant to the main events at the Getty, just about every cultural institution in Southern California is participating by offering programing that either complements or offers a counterpoint to the Getty’s choices. In addition – should one have time to spare – local commercial galleries are also presenting exhibitions of similar work, either supported by the Getty or on their own initiative. Getty Institute PST main website Pacific Standard Time main website Participating commercial gallery website To further complicate our lives and delight our senses several art fairs open this weekend, too. Art Platform international contemporary art fair Co/Lab and a more comprehensive Co/Lab website here (for instance, click for free shuttle to the artist laden beer-garden-party at Angel City Brewing) BOOM is a selection by Hammer curator Ali Subotnick of work by MFA students and recent grads from schools around So Cal. Open Platform brings artists, writers, curators, collectors and other art world luminaries to a table of conversation and offers them, and us, an ‘open platform’ on which to expound, inquire and pursue dialogue. Organized by MOCA Senior Education Program Manager Aandrea Stang. Epson Video Lounge, curated by Paul Young of Young Projects, will present to the audience (you and me!) a challenging series of experimental contemporary films. Pulse international contemporary art fair I find that ArtSlant...

Andrew Berardini on Jay Tucker’s “Nudies”: Night Gallery at Co/Lab

Andrew Berardini: In a black room in Lincoln Heights, I just saw these paintings all lined up on the ground of young girls posed and plaintive, depicted with a certain flatness, almost unemotive, marginally pervy, sometimes their bodies not fitting together quite right, the perspective skewed, the coloring almost advertorial. The backgrounds were always neutral, blank, a mass of brush strokes setting off the ladies lithe limbs and strange tan lines. They almost looked like the sweetest kind of amateur porno (Midwestern grade school teachers looking for love on all the sultry sites) or something darker still, a compendium of targets, lust-laden quarry.   They are intriguing, even if they don’t even have the right raunch of porn that turns you on when you’re alone but makes you uncomfortable when you’re around others. Weirdly enough, I couldn’t help liking them. “Found” as they were in a thrift shop, ready to be redistributed or thrown away if they malingered too long in the racks. But they wouldn’t have. If I’d found one of these paintings in a second-hand shop, in the streets leaning against a garbage can, baking under the sun on a blanket in a flea market, I would have saved it too, and I’m not even sure why. I could tell myself stories about it, who the painter was (the signature reads “Jay T” marked like a cattle brand), who the painter might have been: a dirty old man living out fantasies past potency, a fifteen-year-old lesbian taking a life painting class at the local community college, a would-be Wesselman or Ramos figuring out the painterly possibilities of...

Alexis Smith: Masculine Feminine, Der Zauberberg et Isadora

    Car le corps, c’est la maladie et la volupté, et c’est lui qui fait la mort, oui, ils sont charnels tous deux, l’amour et la mort, et voilà leur terreur et leur grande magie! L’amour pour lui, pour le corps humain, c’est de même un intérêt extrêmement humanitaire et une puissance plus éducative que toute la pédagogie du monde! Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain, conversations between Hans Castorp and Madame Chauchat. I rely on a Wikipedia quote page as I am not able to put my hands on my own copy of Thomas Mann’s The Magic Mountain. This favored paper-back was a gift in 1979 from a lover (and thrillingly to me, PhD candidate) nine years my senior who, I recognize now, appreciated my native enthusiasm but preferred his bleach-blonde psuedo punks to be more lettered. Thus was born in me, my friends, a culture-filiac. Thanks college guy. It happens that Alexis Smith’s works in the current show at Tom Solomon are difficult to photograph. “But wait!,” my more intelligent half says to me, “they’re only difficult to photograph if you want to issue forth pristine images of idealized art objects.” It is as it should be: I find “Isadora” reflected in “Masculine and Feminine,” I see the world outside embedded in the presence of a young Chic magazine model, I stumble everywhere across myself.   Also, the state of these photographs represents perfectly my experience of looking and reading and skipping eagerly ahead then skipping back a few panels to re-read a poignant or poetic note. In this way Smith’s art resembles the cinema and literature...

Touchy Feely at Human Resources – Peter Harkawik curates

Architect and critic Kenneth Frampton’s 1983 essay Towards a Critical Regionalism provided the starting point for artist Peter Harkawik’s curatorial debut in Los Angeles. Harkawik’s statement makes this clear. Link to Frampton’s essay. Link to Harkawik’s statement. [All Frampton quotes are from the essay linked. The nice people at Human Resources (Devin McNulty and Eric Kim) emailed to me content from their announcement, I have pasted Harkawik’s statement and the announcement images at the close of this post.] I understand Frampton to be making a case for an architecture that builds from the site, rather than upon it. I got the sense that in the author’s mind Western or ‘Universal’ architecture fails due to the West’s faith that ours is the correct and ultimate future of all cultures. It could be said that Modern architecture has colonized space – only partly addressing the needs of its inhabitants because its other agenda is to enforce a rationalist or ‘cleansed’ manner of living. Frampton writes eloquently of the dangers of Populism: “In contradistinction to Critical Regionalism, the primary vehicle of Populism is the communicative or instrumental sign. (Italics in the original.) Such a sign seeks to evoke not a critical perception of reality, but rather the sublimation of a desire for direct experience through the provision of information. Its tactic is to attain, as economically as possible, a preconceived level of gratification in behavioristic terms. In this respect, the strong affinity of Populism for the rhetorical techniques and imagery of advertising is hardly accidental. Unless one guards against such a convergence, one will confuse the resistant capacity of a critical practice...

Take an abstract object and make it fall apart: Painter’s Forms at Pepin Moore

I am excited to see Brett Cody Rogers’ exhibition, Painter’s Forms, at Pepin Moore, the show opens on Saturday, September 17. The last time I saw Rogers’ work, in fact the only time I had seen his work prior to this summer, was in 2005 at the artist’s last solo exhibition in Los Angeles with Dave Kordansky. Rogers was then just out of school and the show included five or six large paintings. Subsequent exhibitions, also of paintings, were in Europe. (In fact there were group exhibitions in LA over the years which included paintings by Rogers, but seeing one or two paintings every year or so does not offer much chance for understanding.) Recognizing that I had little experience with his practice, I paid close attention at one of the painting panel discussions this summer, where Rogers spoke with passion (and in a questioning tone) of photography and its ability to interrupt a linearity that he felt existed in his own painting practice. After a long and heated back-and-forth among several of the panelists, Rogers stated with a nervous emphasis: “Adding photography (to his painting practice) breaks the linear rhythm and  introduces pockets of non-hierarchical creativity from which new things might be done.” I responded to the artist’s nervousness – the shaky-voiced passionate delivery he used often signals one who is speaking the, or a, truth. I followed up with Rogers immediately after the talk, we exchanged emails and I set up a studio visit. Speaking with him in the studio and looking at completed paintings, paintings in progress, photographs, mobiles and small sculptures I began to understand...

Aaron Wrinkle: Something New Under The Sun

Aaron Wrinkle: about Aaron Wrinkle is a web based organization created to generate discourse, on and off the web, drawing from colloquial uses of the business name, logotype, and the ways galleries and other art institutions represent their organizations online. It is a hybrid space exhibiting writings, documentation of places, artworks and special web projects by artists. It focuses on the thinking and language behind the web as a primary and secondary viewing platform of art production to facilitate a conversation on this topic. Aaron Wrinkle: image and text For Image and Text artists and other art professionals have been invited to submit an image of their liking along with a descriptive text.  The images can be anything from an individual work, a portrait of a favorite artist or person, a favorite site, artwork or architecture and other images possibly pulled from the internet or personal archives. In general here the images propose or suggest taste whereas the artist’s meaning behind these desired presentations is specified through writing. (Exhibition Ongoing)   Click through on either the green or the orange text above to view the inaugural exhibition of Wrinkle’s project, this with artist Calvin Lee. Think of Aaron Wrinkle: something new under the sun as an introduction to and an incentive to visit this new project of our friend Mr. Wrinkle. If I had also posted Lee’s project on this page then you might not click through to see the real thing. In this virtual universe ‘real’ means leading visitor outside of one’s own site. This way readers will have their own experience of a project, first hand. I...