I, embarrassed, blog before you at this very late date…

…about the CCF Fellowship grant winners for 2011, Part 3.

Hernandez, Lewicki, Ma, O’Daniel, Page, Popp, Thomson. Apologies to all, and here we go.

Gregory Michael Hernandez, Flatland installation at Emma Gray Headquarters (btw the show is still up and available for viewing by appointment 310.497.6895, link to EGHQ provided (and suggested!)

Gregory Michael Hernandez, Flatland installation at Emma Gray Headquarters (btw the show is still up and available for viewing by appointment 310.497.6895, link to EGHQ provided (and suggested!)

Another installation view at EGHQ. Get thee to La Cienega, soon. Cool books available, too.

Another installation view at EGHQ. Get thee to La Cienega, soon. Cool books available, too.

 

last chance!

last chance!

(For about three of you out there that “last chance!” will bring to mind Ricki Lee Jones’s 1979 song “Last Chance Texaco.” Here for lyrics. No good video available. There you go. Well, maybe this one is ok but usually I prefer the recordings I remember. ;-])

But back to Mike.

REBUILDING THE WALL (2007) This one door, one room, one window structure in the Mojave Desert inspired much of my work. On one particular visit I found that the window was exposed, so I stacked the surrounding bricks to form the original height of the walls. Then I closed off the doorway and crawled out the window, giving future visitors the choice and satisfaction of knocking it down in order to enter. Link to Hernandez's website.

REBUILDING THE WALL (2007) This one door, one room, one window structure in the Mojave Desert inspired much of my work. On one particular visit I found that the window was exposed, so I stacked the surrounding bricks to form the original height of the walls. Then I closed off the doorway and crawled out the window, giving future visitors the choice and satisfaction of knocking it down in order to enter. Link to Hernandez's website.

Gregory Michael Hernandez Artist Statement: “My work is rooted in landscape, and how we visually and physically perceive it. Growing up in the Mojave Desert and coming to Los Angeles for college, I began my artistic trajectory as a painter exploring the contrast between barren wilderness and urban terrain.” continue reading here

Imagine that you want to represent an urban staircase photographically, and at the same time allude to social status and to question the ability of landscape as experienced to be represented outside that experience. Where do you begin? Um, you find an old staircase in the city somewhere, doing research you come across historical information about modes of travel and how economic classes make use of our shared landscape. You don’t want necessarily to bring this to the fore in your work, but since it is a part of your experience of the making it is present anyway. and available to the thoughtful viewer. You decide to photograph the surface of the individual stairs, there’s a gentleman in your way, sleeping. Politely, gently you ask his permission and inquire if he would like to move out of the way for a moment. Getting no response you then must include this gentleman in your landscape, and given this soul’s matter-of-fact and careless inclusion as a part of our city’s mise en scene, this seems fitting.

Compiling and collaging your photos, they become a plan view of the staircase. But – as a viewer and not a maker, look quickly from one to another of the photos above, like reading a flip book – these are not diagrammatic representations at all. I mean in part they are, but they are also so very much like sculpture and as you peer in and inspect them, each slice of photo each retains an identity and a place in time.

And the man is present and unavoidable – inescapable, even, in his flattened absence.

Having now thought this out, remind yourself that you have no need to recreate what Mike Hernandez has already so eloquently stated and elegantly made.

Pay attention to what Mike Hernandez is doing, and as you watch him notice how each of his works places your body in space, the present space that you occupy with the work and also the desert homesteads as at EGHQ, and the urban landscape is in photographic projects. (Photos that long to become sculptures, by the way. That final image above is titled “Monument to Upward Mobility” and may someday exist as such a monument.) Hernandez’ continuing connection to his painterly roots can be discerned in the way his sculptures bleed out into landscape, idealized and real, like figures in paintings. Look to one of his heroes, Jean-Francois Millet, and note how rooted Millet’s characters are. Millet’s paintings, like Hernandez’s sculptures, make me long to be out, off of a road somewhere, as far as my mind can take me, just noticing.

Andrew Lewicki, y=x², 2010, plywood, Douglas Fir, black pipe, 8 ft. x 16 ft. x 13 ft.

Andrew Lewicki, y=x², 2010, plywood, Douglas Fir, black pipe, 8 ft. x 16 ft. x 13 ft.

Andrew Lewicki, Petit Dejeuner (2008) plaster rapid prototype, enamel 5" x 5" x 2.25" This object makes me scream. So damn funny. So Rose Bowl Swap Meet wrong. Link here to Lewicki's website.

Andrew Lewicki, Petit Dejeuner (2008) plaster rapid prototype, enamel 5" x 5" x 2.25" This object makes me scream. So damn funny. So Rose Bowl Swap Meet wrong. Link here to Lewicki's website.

 

Andrew Lewicki, Oreo Manhole Cover, 2010, cast iron, 1.25 in. x 28 in. x 28 in. link to CCF artist's page

Andrew Lewicki, Oreo Manhole Cover, 2010, cast iron, 1.25 in. x 28 in. x 28 in. link to CCF artist's page

Andrew Lewicki Artist Statement: “Using sculpture, site specific installation and photography I explore ideas on longing and desire, notions of inferiority in a materialistic society, and the transformative power of liberation through the manipulation of material and form.” Continue reading here.

Nuttaphol Ma, This Land Is Your Land, 2009, Installation, 8 ft. x 22 ft. x 32 ft.

Nuttaphol Ma, This Land Is Your Land, 2009, Installation, 8 ft. x 22 ft. x 32 ft.

Nuttaphol Ma, Ruins of Daedalus` Labyrinth, 2011, installation, 12 ft. x 24 ft. x 38 ft. Link to Ma's website.

Nuttaphol Ma, Ruins of Daedalus` Labyrinth, 2011, installation, 12 ft. x 24 ft. x 38 ft. Link to Ma's website.

Nuttaphol Ma Artist’s Statement: “A dear friend asked me one day,  “How can I make work about life if I do not live?”  This question, as simple as it may be, profoundly affects the way I work.” Continue reading here.

Visit Ma’s Vimeo page here. New film “Born by the River” just uploaded last week.

 

Alison O'Daniels, Astral Projector at The Free Church at The Museum of Public Fiction

Alison O'Daniels, Astral Projector at The Free Church at The Museum of Public Fiction

 

Astral Projector at The Free Church at The Museum of Public Fiction

Astral Projector at The Free Church at The Museum of Public Fiction

Alison O'Daniels, Astral Projector at The Free Church at The Museum of Public Fiction

Alison O'Daniels, Astral Projector at The Free Church at The Museum of Public Fiction

 

Alison O'Daniels' great images from various projects, filmic and otherwise, plus links from here down

Alison O'Daniels' great images from various projects, filmic and otherwise, plus links from here down

 

This link to O'Daniels' main website

This link to O'Daniels' main website

This link to O'Daniels' main website

This link to O'Daniels' main website

Alison O’Daniels Artist Statement: “I work across disciplines, examining perceptual and emotional sensitivity between people, objects and environments. My work combines sculpture, sound-baths, drawings, paintings, sports/dance teams and feature films with live music.” Continue reading here.

Sound bath. Whatever that is, don’t you want one?

Nate Page, chroma/color, 2008, CalArts Library, 10 ft. x 8 ft. x 50 ft. Link to Nate Page artist page on CCF site.

Nate Page, chroma/color, 2008, CalArts Library, 10 ft. x 8 ft. x 50 ft. Link to Nate Page artist page on CCF site.

Nate Page, Interrogation by Design, 2010, contents of Woodbury University Gallery Hollywood storage, 15 ft. x 18 ft. x 40 ft.

Nate Page, Interrogation by Design, 2010, contents of Woodbury University Gallery Hollywood storage, 15 ft. x 18 ft. x 40 ft.

Nate Page Artist Statement: “I am curious about what draws people to aesthetic experience. I recognize that design can be a powerful form of manipulation behind this experience. Our environments are composed almost entirely of things that are devised to have specific influences over us…” Continue reading here.

Link to Nancy Popp's website

Link to Nancy Popp's website

Nancy Popp, Roll, 2010, site-located performance/installation, 8 ft. x 20 ft. x 300 ft. Link to CCF artist's page.

Nancy Popp, Roll, 2010, site-located performance/installation, 8 ft. x 20 ft. x 300 ft. Link to CCF artist's page.

Travertine, 2006, performance, high-density foam, paint, museum architecture, 32 in. x 32 in. x 48 in.

Travertine, 2006, performance, high-density foam, paint, museum architecture, 32 in. x 32 in. x 48 in.

Nancy Popp Artist Statement: “My work draws upon the rich traditions of durational, corporeal performance and political intervention to explore relations between body as site, the context of site that envelopes the body, and the constant fluctuations that connect the two.” Continue reading here.

Mungo Thomson, Coat Check Chimes Whitney Museum, 2008, nickel-plated aluminum and steel, 1,200 pieces, 100 in. x 100 in. x 100 in.

Mungo Thomson, Coat Check Chimes Whitney Museum, 2008, nickel-plated aluminum and steel, 1,200 pieces, 100 in. x 100 in. x 100 in.

Mungo Thomson, B/W, 2008, 2-sided vinyl record, 12 in. x 12 in.

Mungo Thomson, B/W, 2008, 2-sided vinyl record, 12 in. x 12 in.

B/W On Site, 2008, 2-sided vinyl LP, 12 in. x 12 in.

B/W On Site, 2008, 2-sided vinyl LP, 12 in. x 12 in.

Mungo Thomson, Negative Space Hammer Museum, 2008, photographic murals on three walls, 251 in. x 585 in. x 255 in.

Mungo Thomson, Negative Space Hammer Museum, 2008, photographic murals on three walls, 251 in. x 585 in. x 255 in.

 

Silent Film of a Tree Falling in the Forest, 2006 16mm film, color, silent, 7:10 minutes Installation view, 2008 Whitney Biennial Exhibition, Park Avenue Armory, New York. Link to Thomson's own site. Photo: James Ewing

Silent Film of a Tree Falling in the Forest, 2006 16mm film, color, silent, 7:10 minutes Installation view, 2008 Whitney Biennial Exhibition, Park Avenue Armory, New York. Link to Thomson's own site. Photo: James Ewing

Adam Carr, “Lives and Works” in Spike Magazine, 2010 interview with Mungo Thomson, here. (If the link, which is to a pdf, fails, here is a link to Thomson’s “Text” page with a variety of links.

Mungo Thomson Artist Statement: “My work in a range of media concerns cosmology, mass culture, and reception. I make installations, sounds, films, sculpture, drawings, and books. I am interested in the gaps, pauses, and digressions that occur in our common cultural narratives and institutions, and, phenomenologically speaking, in the idea that we don’t really see the lenses through which we see.” Continue reading here.

Thanks for reading, thanks for your patience. Each of these people have current projects so visit their sites and figure out where you can see something.

Do remember to stop by Emma Gray Headquarters this weekend.

All my best,

Geoff

CCF part one: Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part one

CCF part two: Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part two

CCF part three: I, embarrassed, blog before you…

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