Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part two

Martin Durazo

Martin Durazo, Tezcatl, 2010, Plexiglas, 36 x 48 x 30 inches, link to CCF artist page

Martin Durazo, Tezcatl, 2010, Plexiglas, 36 x 48 x 30 inches, link to CCF artist page

 

Martin Durazo, Ascension, 2010, acrylic spray paint and black gesso on canvas, 30 in. x 40 in. x 2 in., CCF linked

Martin Durazo, Ascension, 2010, acrylic spray paint and black gesso on canvas, 30 in. x 40 in. x 2 in., CCF linked

Martin Durazo Artist Statement: “My sculptural and installation work is inspired and created from mass produced objects that are often illicit in nature…” (continue reading on CCF website here)

Martin Durazo, Baby Room, 2010 mixed media on insulation panels 8 x 20 feet. Link to Luis de Jesus Gallery

Martin Durazo, Baby Room, 2010 mixed media on insulation panels 8 x 20 feet. Link to Luis de Jesus Gallery

Christina Fernandez

Christina Fernandez, Coldwell Couch, 2010, billboard, 20 ft. x 40 ft. link to CCF website

Christina Fernandez, Coldwell Couch, 2010, billboard, 20 ft. x 40 ft. link to CCF website

Christina Fernandez, mattress, 2010, archival ink jet print, 30 in. x 24 in. link to CCF site

Christina Fernandez, mattress, 2010, archival ink jet print, 30 in. x 24 in. link to CCF site

Link to Fernandez’ page on the “How Many Billboards?” project (MAK Center) website, here.

Fernandez’ Artist Statement: “My work examines the intersections between private and public space, personal and historical narratives, ex-urban and city spaces and the cultural border and historical relationships between the United States and Mexico….” (continue reading on CCF website here)

 

Christina Fernandez, Blue Shirt (from the Sereno series) 2010 Link to Gallery Luisotti page on Artnet

Christina Fernandez, Blue Shirt (from the Sereno series) 2010 Link to Gallery Luisotti page on Artnet

Patricia Fernandez

Patricia Fernandez, its yours now. its all that there is., 2010, paintings and drawings on walnut sculpture, 64 in. x 91 in. x 26 in. Link to CCF website

Patricia Fernandez, its yours now. its all that there is., 2010, paintings and drawings on walnut sculpture, 64 in. x 91 in. x 26 in. Link to CCF website

Patricia Fernandez, Facsimiles, 2010, mixed media, 9 in. x 13 in. x 8 in. Link to CCF website

Patricia Fernandez, Facsimiles, 2010, mixed media, 9 in. x 13 in. x 8 in. Link to CCF website

Patricia Fernandez Artist Statement: “Applying an archeological approach to the family archive, my work questions the expectations of inherited history and the inaccuracy of memory…” (continue reading here)

Patricia Fernandez, View, 2010 Ink, acrylic and fabric collage on paper 12 x 9.5 inches. Link to ltd los angeles website

Patricia Fernandez, View, 2010 Ink, acrylic and fabric collage on paper 12 x 9.5 inches. Link to ltd los angeles website

Jocelyn Foye

Jocelyn Foye, Watch Out, 2010, sculptural relief painting, 48 in. x 68 in. x 4 in. link to CCF site

Jocelyn Foye, Watch Out, 2010, sculptural relief painting, 48 in. x 68 in. x 4 in. link to CCF site

Jocelyn Foye, Pow Wow, 2007, sculptural relief painting (from a performance), 34 in. x 31 in. x 3 in. link to CCF

Jocelyn Foye, Pow Wow, 2007, sculptural relief painting (from a performance), 34 in. x 31 in. x 3 in. link to CCF

Jocelyn Foye Artist Statement: “Raised by a taxonomist in New England, I produce work that incorporates an understanding of this scientific practice of observing and collecting. Currently, I am trying to capture and illustrate how the recurrence of everyday processes derived from labor produces a fundamental visual pattern…” (continue reading here)

Link to “The Map Quest,” and interactive web project in collaboration with Jean Robison.

Jocelyn Foye, boxing performance on a bed of corn starch 16' x 16' x 2"  2009, Photo, Angel's Gate Cultural Center, Project Room G3. Link to Jocelyn Foye's website

Jocelyn Foye, boxing performance on a bed of corn starch 16' x 16' x 2" 2009, Photo, Angel's Gate Cultural Center, Project Room G3. Link to Jocelyn Foye's website

Jocelyn Foye, boxing performance on a bed of corn starch 16' x 16' x 2" 2009, Photo, Angel's Gate Cultural Center, Project Room G3. Link to Jocelyn Foye's website

Jocelyn Foye, boxing performance on a bed of corn starch 16' x 16' x 2" 2009, Photo, Angel's Gate Cultural Center, Project Room G3. Link to Jocelyn Foye's website

Jocelyn Foye, photo, boxing performance on a bed of corn starch 16' x 16' x 2" 2009 Angel's Gate Cultural Center, Project Room G3, link to Angel's Gate Cultural Center

Jocelyn Foye, photo, boxing performance on a bed of corn starch 16' x 16' x 2" 2009 Angel's Gate Cultural Center, Project Room G3, link to Angel's Gate Cultural Center

 

Jocelyn Foye, photo from Boxing performance at Angel's Gate Cultural Center

Jocelyn Foye, photo from Boxing performance at Angel's Gate Cultural Center

 

Jocelyn Foye, Fists, the artist's sculptural response to her Boxing performance. I am noticing that Foye's work often consists of an original performative act - one that might be somehow essential to the nature of the actors-as-performers, such as the ballet series, and also loaded with cultural weight such as boxing and a pow wow - and that is further represented with photographs and sculptures.

Jocelyn Foye, Fists, the artist's sculptural response to her Boxing performance. I am noticing that Foye's work often consists of an original performative act - one that might be somehow essential to the nature of the actors-as-performers, such as the ballet series, and also loaded with cultural weight such as boxing and a pow wow - and that is further represented with photographs and sculptures.

Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines, Airplanecrashclock, 1997, mixed media and electronics, 9 ft. x 12 ft. x 5 ft. link to CCF

Charles Gaines, Airplanecrashclock, 1997, mixed media and electronics, 9 ft. x 12 ft. x 5 ft. link to CCF

Charles Gaines, String Theory: Rewriting Fanon #2, 2010, graphite on paper, 24 in. x 71 in.

Charles Gaines, String Theory: Rewriting Fanon #2, 2010, graphite on paper, 24 in. x 71 in.

Charles Gaines Artist Statement quoted in its entirety:

“Before 1990, my work investigated the role systems played in the construction of forms and objects. I used numerical systems of progression as a way to form strategies of change where change itself was determined by the rules of the system, or I used numbers to form plotting systems that allowed me to sequence objects (mostly natural objects).

Since 1995, my interest moved from the use of systems and numbers to language itself.   I foregrounded two critical concepts: the postmodern sublime and metonymy. I made works that combined drawn or photographic images and/or text in provocative ways to imply or insinuate connections between them, forming a metonymic chain. For example, in String Theory: Rewriting Fanon (2010), I radically changed the sequence of words from Franz Fanon’s Black Skin White Masks. The resulting arbitrary word sequence required the viewer to form metonymic conflations in order to realize meaning from sentences that were not formed with the intention to express specific ideas.”

Blessed are those who are capable of eloquence and who also value brevity.

You should know, my friends, that Charles Gaines has trained some of the most influential artists in Los Angeles during his tenure at CalArts. You should thank him for this and also we must thank Charles Gaines for continuing all the time to experiment and to explore in his practice, to state and restate, to take risks and run with them to places we could not expect – except that once he shows us where he is, what Charles Gaines does and makes, makes a great deal of sense. And it disturbs us from our comfortable notions of what is possible.

When I visited “Lurid Stories: Charles Gaines Projects 1995-2001 curated by Julie Joyce at the Luckman Gallery at CSULA it was my first experience with Gaines’ art. I still read the publication often enough to keep in touch with it, and now I have a long relationship with the artist’s work. This would not happen if I came across a work in a gallery show – or it would happen much more slowly. My mind was open, I had no concept of what I might find inside, and consequently my head exploded on that night in 2001. You should be so lucky. This is why I go so many places: there is always a chance that I will be led to an exhibition that I will be thinking about ten years after I see it. I have no way of knowing when this might happen. Why take the risk? Rant over.

So good people who read Notes, if I tell you that I feel quiet and humbled as I write these words you ought not be surprised. Charles Gaines the artist changed the way I think and Charles Gaines the teacher encouraged several of the artists whom I most admire to be… better, always better.

Link to the video “Explosions,” and a talk that Gaines gave at Susanne Vielmetter in Berlin. This is a nice film – Charles Gaines speaks over views of the exhibition installation and then walks us through the show.

Look for Gaines in September at Susanne Vielmetter,  Dance/Draw opening at the ICA Boston in October, and in Blues at Moca in 2012.

Janie Geiser

Janie Geiser, The Reptile Under the Flowers (mother/son), 2009 "In The Reptile Under the Flowers, the elliptical narrative is constructed through the accumulation of scenes and events, most of which are contained in performed dioramas, single or multiple viewer peepshows, puppet attractions, and shadow plays. The Reptile Under the Flowers suggests two overlapping narratives.  In one, a white collar criminal returns home, only to remain an absent presence, living in the top floor of his home, his pacing a constant reminder to the family below (inspired by the title character of Ibsen's John Gabriel Borkman). The second narrative involves his son, who becomes a soldier, experiences unknown horrors, and goes awol.  The son slowly travels across the world to return home---when he returns, he can never enter the house.  In the end, their world crumbles under the weight of the winter snows, shrouding longing and desire in a soft, smothering denial." link to Geiser's site

Janie Geiser, The Reptile Under the Flowers (mother/son), 2009 "In The Reptile Under the Flowers, the elliptical narrative is constructed through the accumulation of scenes and events, most of which are contained in performed dioramas, single or multiple viewer peepshows, puppet attractions, and shadow plays. The Reptile Under the Flowers suggests two overlapping narratives. In one, a white collar criminal returns home, only to remain an absent presence, living in the top floor of his home, his pacing a constant reminder to the family below (inspired by the title character of Ibsen's John Gabriel Borkman). The second narrative involves his son, who becomes a soldier, experiences unknown horrors, and goes awol. The son slowly travels across the world to return home---when he returns, he can never enter the house. In the end, their world crumbles under the weight of the winter snows, shrouding longing and desire in a soft, smothering denial." link to Geiser's site

Janie Geiser, Frankenstein (Mortal Toys), 2007

Janie Geiser, Frankenstein (Mortal Toys), 2007

Link to some videos on Janie Geiser’s site here.

Geoser’s Artist Statement: “As an experimental filmmaker, I’m intrigued by the intersection of artifice and real life…” (continue reading here)

Film on CCF site here.

Alexandra Grant

Alexandra Grant, Love House, 2008, photograph, 10 in. x 10 in. link to CCF

Alexandra Grant, Love House, 2008, photograph, 10 in. x 10 in. link to CCF

Alexandra Grant, I draw a hot sorrow bath, 2011, Ink on paper, 13 in. x 8 in.

Alexandra Grant, I draw a hot sorrow bath, 2011, Ink on paper, 13 in. x 8 in.

 

Alexandra Grant, body (17), after Michael Joyce's "moon" 2010, Oil on canvas, 20 x 20 inches Link to Honor Fraser Gallery

Alexandra Grant, body (17), after Michael Joyce's "moon" 2010, Oil on canvas, 20 x 20 inches Link to Honor Fraser Gallery

Alexandra Grant Artist Statement: “My work is a long-term engagement with language in painting, drawing, sculpture and social practice. Most of my endeavors are collaborative by nature – seeking out writers and writing that I believe keep the “word” alive in a variety of settings with different audiences…” (continue reading here)

 

CCF part one: Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part one

CCF part two: Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part two

CCF part three: I, embarrassed, blog before you…

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