Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part one

I’ll save any preamble for a postscript and dive right into the important part of this post: the artist winners of the 2011 California Community Foundation Fellowship for Visual Artist Grants. Beginning with Kevin Appel and moving alphabetically through the list.

Oh! One thing that I feel is almost as important as the giving and receiving: these grants are UNRESTRICTED and require no production or further action by the artists who receive them. Lord, lord, lord, if you give a person money make sure that you give it freely. Well done CCF.

Onward to artist information:

Kevin Appel

Kevin Appel, : Untitled (screen), Powder coated steel, brass plated steel, enamel, 2011, 84" x 120" x 12" (interior shapes variable) Image is from Appel's own website, which is linked and which I strongly recommend that you visit.

Kevin Appel, : Untitled (screen), Powder coated steel, brass plated steel, enamel, 2011, 84" x 120" x 12" (interior shapes variable) Image is from Appel's own website, which is linked and which I strongly recommend that you visit.

 

Kevin Appel, Screen (ocean), acrylic, screen ink, and UV cured print on canvas over panel, 2011, 60 x 48 inches. Image from and link to Appel's website.

Kevin Appel, Screen (ocean), acrylic, screen ink, and UV cured print on canvas over panel, 2011, 60 x 48 inches. Image from and link to Appel's website.

 

Kevin Appel, : Barn Owl 1, Gouache and pencil on inkjet print, 2011, 11" x 8.5" link again to kevinappelstudio.com

Kevin Appel, : Barn Owl 1, Gouache and pencil on inkjet print, 2011, 11" x 8.5" link again to kevinappelstudio.com

As I opened Kevin Appel’s website to do some research for this post I thought to myself, “Here I’ve been all morning, looking at images and at the world around me: the newspaper,  morning walk, sundry websites – and this all makes sense to me in a time-based visual way. Objects line up, shapes develop in familiar ways, one thing then another in a moderately sequential fashion.” So looking at Appel’s work images from 2011 my mind said: “Wait a minute! What sense does this make? Why are those shapes there, and why do they seem so unfamiliar to me? When did that trapezoid happen, and is that a white shape or a void, and where is the rest of that triangle???”

Understanding that I am viewing images and not real things, and knowing that such questions have been parts of Appel’s practice for years, still – the ability to see fifteen years of an artist’s practice in one place, even if only in reproduction, is a luxury and a delight.

Kevin Appel’s Artist Statement from CCF Website:

My work addresses the relationship between physical space, architecture and the painted image. Currently, I am employing photographic material as a ground on which to build paintings. The nature photographs act… (Continue reading on the CCF website here)

Look for Appel’s work currently at Peter Blum Gallery in New York, LANY organized by Mario Diacono; and along with Ruben Ochoa at the San Jose Museum of Art “Beta Space,” catalogue by Kristen Evangelista.

Off subject but still very important:

In August thru February the SJMusArt new Beta Space series will feature work by Anna Sew Hoy and in October thru March (hold your breath!) “This Kind of Bird Flies Backward: Paintings of Joan Brown” will open. Rock on. Two of the baddest women from two different neighborhoods of the contemporary art continuum showing at the same time. In the city that Burt Bacharach, Hal David and Dionne Warwick helped to make a household word long before the Silicon Valley spread its all-encompassing wings over our culture and our lives. (more off trackness: at 24 seconds in the video I linked is Warwick posed in front of what resembles Roger Corman versions of Isamu Noguchi sculptures)

Deborah Aschheim

Deborah Aschheim, Encounter (The Theme Building so beautiful encased in scaffo), 2009, ink on Duralar, 25 in. x 40 in. Link to and image from CCF website

Deborah Aschheim, Encounter (The Theme Building so beautiful encased in scaffo), 2009, ink on Duralar, 25 in. x 40 in. Link to and image from CCF website

Deborah Aschheim, Earworm (swoon), 2008, plastic, copper, LEDs, speakers, music, 10 ft. x 6 ft. x 6 ft. Link to Deborah Aschheim's own website.

Deborah Aschheim, Earworm (swoon), 2008, plastic, copper, LEDs, speakers, music, 10 ft. x 6 ft. x 6 ft. Link to Deborah Aschheim's own website.

Deborah Aschheim, Earworm (node), 2008, plastic, copper, LED, 10 ft. x 15 ft. x 1 in.

Deborah Aschheim, Earworm (node), 2008, plastic, copper, LED, 10 ft. x 15 ft. x 1 in.

Perhaps you saw Aschheim’s Nostalgia For the Future exhibition at Edward Cella last year?

Deborah Aschheim’s Artist Statement:

I make installations that reconcile the physicality of bodies and spaces with the subjective experiences of the mind.  I have mapped networks of my memories across the gallery, embedded in delicate webs… (continue reading artists statement on the CCF website here)

 

Cindy Bernard

Cindy Bernard, Year Long Loop, October grid. "Recorded between October 2004 and September 2005, Year Long Loop documents the sound and view as experienced from the vantage point of a ridge in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Mt. Washington. A cross between John Cage's 4'33 and Andy Warhol's Empire, the full length version of this homage to structuralist film consists of twelve two hour long segments, a continuous 24 hour loop that cycles through time. This shortened version cuts the shot length of the original, allowing for the year to be experienced in 2 hours instead of 24." Image from and link to Bernard's website.

Cindy Bernard, Year Long Loop, October grid. "Recorded between October 2004 and September 2005, Year Long Loop documents the sound and view as experienced from the vantage point of a ridge in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Mt. Washington. A cross between John Cage's 4'33 and Andy Warhol's Empire, the full length version of this homage to structuralist film consists of twelve two hour long segments, a continuous 24 hour loop that cycles through time. This shortened version cuts the shot length of the original, allowing for the year to be experienced in 2 hours instead of 24." Image from and link to Bernard's website.

 

Cindy Bernard, February grid. Again linked to Bernard's site.

Cindy Bernard, February grid. Again linked to Bernard's site.

 

Cindy Bernard, Learning to Listen, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida (White), video still 2006-2008 "A work in progress featuring videos that archive artifacts from the analog past such as Bozo the Clown on 78 and In-a-gadda-da-vida on 8-track as well as recent epiphanies of sound including James Tenney performing John Cage's 4'33" at the Schindler House (a performance I organized). Photographs document sites and objects from a personal iconography of listening -- ham radio antennas, old gear, practice studios and newly defunct record stores."

Cindy Bernard, Learning to Listen, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida (White), video still 2006-2008 "A work in progress featuring videos that archive artifacts from the analog past such as Bozo the Clown on 78 and In-a-gadda-da-vida on 8-track as well as recent epiphanies of sound including James Tenney performing John Cage's 4'33" at the Schindler House (a performance I organized). Photographs document sites and objects from a personal iconography of listening -- ham radio antennas, old gear, practice studios and newly defunct record stores."

Tower Sunset, May 2007, 2007, Chromogenic print, 50.5 x 28.25 inches, ed. 5

Tower Sunset, May 2007, 2007, Chromogenic print, 50.5 x 28.25 inches, ed. 5

 

Cindy Bernard, Silent Key, Portraits, CR7LU, Lucia Santos Tomé Beira, Mozambique, 1953 Active, 1952 to date. "For most of my life, I lived with a soundtrack of blips and bleeps emanating from my grandfather's "radio room." A dedicated "Dx-er" and operating first as W6ANN and later as W6BA, Bill Adams pursed contact with fellow ham radio operators located in the most distant regions of the world. First licensed in 1923, he remained active until his death in 1999, when he became a "silent key."  The series "Silent Key" maps these communications which occurred across vast political divides and shifts in territorial alliances. It is derived from his archive of 6000 "QSL" cards spanning 1923 -1996. QSL cards are exchanged by amateur radio operators to verify a 2-way contact. In ham lingo, QSL means, "I hear you" or "I acknowledge receipt." Each card contains the ham's call sign, location and the details of the communication. Because much of amateur radio is in Morse code, hams use the QSL cards to express their personality and/or something about the region in which they live, resulting in an amazing visual array of graphics, images and vernacular typography representing virtually every country in the world.

Cindy Bernard, Silent Key, Portraits, CR7LU, Lucia Santos Tomé Beira, Mozambique, 1953 Active, 1952 to date. "For most of my life, I lived with a soundtrack of blips and bleeps emanating from my grandfather's "radio room." A dedicated "Dx-er" and operating first as W6ANN and later as W6BA, Bill Adams pursed contact with fellow ham radio operators located in the most distant regions of the world. First licensed in 1923, he remained active until his death in 1999, when he became a "silent key." The series "Silent Key" maps these communications which occurred across vast political divides and shifts in territorial alliances. It is derived from his archive of 6000 "QSL" cards spanning 1923 -1996. QSL cards are exchanged by amateur radio operators to verify a 2-way contact. In ham lingo, QSL means, "I hear you" or "I acknowledge receipt." Each card contains the ham's call sign, location and the details of the communication. Because much of amateur radio is in Morse code, hams use the QSL cards to express their personality and/or something about the region in which they live, resulting in an amazing visual array of graphics, images and vernacular typography representing virtually every country in the world.

Cindy Bernard Artist Statement from CCF website:

I take an active interest in instigating social exchange. In the last several years my work has transitioned from photographs and projections exploring cinema, memory and landscape (including the widely exhibited series Ask the Dust) to projects that focus on sound and music as a part of a visual practice.

In 1999, I founded the experimental music series sound which later incorporated as a nonprofit, The Society for the Activation of Social Space through Art and Sound (SASSAS)… (continue reading Bernard’s artist statement here)

 

Cindy Bernard, Silent Key, Portraits, JF1IST operating as 3Y5X, Jin Fujiwara Bouvet Island, 1990 Active, 1972 to date. All Silent Key works: 2008 Pigment prints 24 x 18.5 inches Edition of 3

Cindy Bernard, Silent Key, Portraits, JF1IST operating as 3Y5X, Jin Fujiwara Bouvet Island, 1990 Active, 1972 to date. All Silent Key works: 2008 Pigment prints 24 x 18.5 inches Edition of 3

Look for current Cindy Bernard projects:

SASSAS – Sound at the Schindler House: Saturday, July 23 at 7:30 pm “The Stephanie Taylor Songbook.”

A listening party as part of “Act Natural,” a solo exhibition by Taft Green at Human Resources. Thursday, July 28 at 7:30 pm. Also showing at Human Resources is Scott Benzel “Mal-Dis-Tri-Bu-Tion.” Great images after both HR links.

 

Carolyn Castaño

Carolyn Castaño, Decorated Flower Head (Lost) 2011. Image from and link to Castano's website.

Carolyn Castaño, Decorated Flower Head (Lost) 2011. Image from and link to Castano's website.

Carolyn Castaño, Narco Venus (Karlita) 2011

Carolyn Castaño, Narco Venus (Karlita) 2011

 

Carolyn Castaño, Electric Yandara : Acrylic, glitter on canvas

Carolyn Castaño, Electric Yandara : Acrylic, glitter on canvas

Carolyn Castaño’s Artist Statement from CCF website:

My work examines personas and narratives associated with the narco wars and political dramas currently unfolding in Latin America. I am interested in not just the human toll of these conflicts, but in what these stories say about our often conflicted fantasies about wealth, love, criminality, honor and beauty.

These fantasies very often come into high relief in our perceptions of women in the male-dominated world of narco-trafficking. (continue reading on CCF website here)

Castaño is also a 2011 COLA grant awardee.

Zoe Crosher

Zoe Crosher, Realities, from her website which is linked.

Zoe Crosher, Realities, from her website which is linked.

 

Zoe Crosher, "THE UNVEILING OF MICHELLE DUBOIS - AARON WRINKLE'S DAN GRAHAM - CHINATOWN - FALL 2010 DOUBLING, 2010" a possible alternate title for this image is "Writing for Madonna in 001" which title the image carried when I grabbed it from Crosher's site. Link to Zoe Crosher's website.

Zoe Crosher, "THE UNVEILING OF MICHELLE DUBOIS - AARON WRINKLE'S DAN GRAHAM - CHINATOWN - FALL 2010 DOUBLING, 2010" a possible alternate title for this image is "Writing for Madonna in 001" which title the image carried when I grabbed it from Crosher's site. Link to Zoe Crosher's website.

Each time I visit Zoe Crosher’s website I go crazy about another series of images. On this day I spent nearly an hour pleasuring my mind and my eye reviewing The Santa Cruz Kids. As many as I can download appear below:

Rex was either born to be, or has made himself, a star. He, or she I suppose, shines here like Antares in the night sky.

Do you recall Avedon’s picture of Dovima??????

 

 

Into another series now, Out The Window (LAX)

LAX hotels map drawn by Simon Storey, whose Anonymous Architects website is linked.

LAX hotels map drawn by Simon Storey, whose Anonymous Architects website is linked.

Y’know, when an artist makes work in a series, as Crosher and Bernard do, illustrating only one piece among the series seems unfair to the project. While I cannot exhibit the entire series here, and while curating my own selections from among a series does place my own interpretation on the work, still I believe that showing a representation of the breadth of the project gives you a better idea of the artist’s idea. Perhaps including these images will have the effect of encouraging you to visit the artist’s own site, or an exhibition, so you can see for yourself.

Also, you need to know that my madness is selfish: I love looking and I love sharing. With each of the artists in this post I am looking and thinking and picking images that speak to me or that grab my eye. Enjoy.

Zoe Crosher’s artist statement:

My photographic and publishing-based work aims to investigate the schism between the fantasy of image/idea and its place/reality, playing with the fictions of documentary and the archive… (continue reading here)

Tony de los Reyes

 

Tony de los Reyes, Cannibal, 2009, Red bister on paper, 59.5 in. x 44.5 in. x 2 in. link to CCF site

Tony de los Reyes, Cannibal, 2009, Red bister on paper, 59.5 in. x 44.5 in. x 2 in. link to CCF site

Tony de los Reyes, 1851 (3), 2011, oil on linen, 33.5 in. x 56.5 in. x 2 in. image from and link to CCF site

Tony de los Reyes, 1851 (3), 2011, oil on linen, 33.5 in. x 56.5 in. x 2 in. image from and link to CCF site

Tony de los Reyes, Chapter 1: Loomings, page 7 (II), 2010, Red bister on paper, 60.75 in. x 44 in. x 2 in.

Tony de los Reyes, Chapter 1: Loomings, page 7 (II), 2010, Red bister on paper, 60.75 in. x 44 in. x 2 in.

Tony de los Reyes Artist Statement:

A consistent theme throughout my career has been new interpretations of historical, political and literary works revitalized through unique materials and techniques. “History painting” may seem anachronistic to contemporary art, but I use the genre to describe an entire range of contemporary dialogues, especially how images are contained by the singular mind and society as a whole… (continue reading on CCF website)

 

Okay my friends, I need to break here and publish this post in a thus far state. My posting is getting chunky and at this rate it may take me all day and more. You’ll check back, I know.

I shall continue directly with two additional posts on the 2011 CCF winners Martin Durazo,  Christina Fernandez,  Patricia Fernandez,  Jocelyn Foye,  Charles Gaines, Janie Geiser, Alexandra Grant, Gregory Michael Hernandez, Andrew Lewicki, Nuttaphol Ma, Alison O’Daniel, Nate Page, Nancy Popp, Mungo Thomson.

A few nice things came to my attention while I have been writing:

A gallery called Laurel Gitlin is having an exhibition at her space in New York. The site leaped out from the ether at me while I was looking at Zoe Crosher’s site, but when I checked back I couldn’t find any link…….. weird and fortuitous – a few of LA’s most interesting artists have work in the current exhibition, “Broken Umbrellas.”

Darren Bader, Bill Jenkins, Virginia Overton, Asha Schechter, Mike Schuh, Valerie Snobeck and Alexander Wagner. As is my usual manner when I have no information, I shall cut and paste from the press release – and then I’ll wish that I were visiting NY this summer.

Fallen out of use, a broken umbrella is an object that has been left without value
or function. The object breaks down into fragments, parts that no longer fit
together to form a complete whole; renamed and reoriented, the relationship between
these elements is a tenuous composition. The word “umbrella” no longer contains the
object — it becomes part of a subsequent language that is understood but cannot be
spoken.

The works in the exhibition fall into this category of the familiar but
unspeakable, part of a psychological abstraction that is rooted in everyday
phenomenological experience. When these familiar structures of objects and spaces
begin to slip, our connection with them becomes fragmented. Logic loses its hold on
reality — meaning, space, and familiarity are all sent into flux.

We see and we might understand, but we cannot say as to why.

The gallery’s summer hours are Tuesday–Friday, 11–6. This exhibition was organized
by Christopher Aque.

For more information or images, please contact
[email protected] or 212.274.0761.

wall: Valerie Snobeck, Untitled, 2008–2011 peeled prints on plastic, reversed bronze aged kickplates, wood, permanent marker, removal tool, wheatpaste, door barricade hardware 63 x 41 inches, floor: Bill Jenkins Lid on Basket, 2010 papier-mâché with metal container 20 x 11 x 11 1/2 inches

wall: Valerie Snobeck, Untitled, 2008–2011 peeled prints on plastic, reversed bronze aged kickplates, wood, permanent marker, removal tool, wheatpaste, door barricade hardware 63 x 41 inches, floor: Bill Jenkins Lid on Basket, 2010 papier-mâché with metal container 20 x 11 x 11 1/2 inches

floor: Bill Jenkins, Untitled, 2011copper pipe on frame16 x 26 x 66 inches wall: Asha Schechter, Pen, 2011 (left) ink on newsprint, magnets 11 1/2 x 17 inches, Asha Schechter, Television, 2011 (right) ink on newsprint, shelf, glass 15 x 18 inches

floor: Bill Jenkins, Untitled, 2011copper pipe on frame16 x 26 x 66 inches wall: Asha Schechter, Pen, 2011 (left) ink on newsprint, magnets 11 1/2 x 17 inches, Asha Schechter, Television, 2011 (right) ink on newsprint, shelf, glass 15 x 18 inches

I am not certain and am making an educated guess that I have linked to Darren Bader’s website. I sure hope I am right because it shows him to be every bit as intelligent, witty and sharp as the group show he did of himself and time last year at Eighth Veil and the fertilizer bag at LACE. You’re great Darren :-]

I find that Jenkins also has work at Feature thru August 6. Hudson continues his command of great contemporary art and his support of the practice. Visit Feature in NY, online or in person. Buy things – they’re good. (It’s been six years since we saw you: “Hi Hudson, I’d make you a smiley face but I did that once in this post. lol…. Cheers!”)

Schechter link is to a site with images and its own link to Schechter’s site. Here also is a link to a October, 2009 I Heart Photograph post of Schechter’s work.

From here my resources fall silent.

An additional exciting opportunity lies in store for you who are on Facebook. (Yeah, I know, in some circles a middle-aged man trolling Facebook would be creepy. FB serves as a giant clearinghouse for information and event notices, and I take my information where I can get it.)

My friend and yours, Malgorzata Romanska & MR Industries now have a face on Facebook, to which I have linked. A request is out from Madame to “like” her page. I’ve done so and I think you should, too. Reasons? Malgorzata is nice and she does good work.

Hang on a minute:

Link to MR Industries

Link to MR Industries

Link to Artillery Magazine essay by Romanska, "East, West and the Restless," Summer, 2010

Link to Artillery Magazine essay by Romanska, "East, West and the Restless," Summer, 2010

CCF part one: Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part one

CCF part two: Congratulations to CCF Fellows, part two

CCF part three: I, embarrassed, blog before you…

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