Available this weekend

Statler Waldorf Gallery have a show opening Friday, June 17. Over the City and Through the Woods, curated by Fritz Chesnut and Molly Larkey with work by Claude Collins-Stracensky, Bryan de Roo, Drew Heitzler, Oliver Irwin, Marie Jager, Gordon Matta-Clark, John Opera and Colin Roberts.

A note about Statler-Waldorf: S-W is an artist-run exhibition space located at 1098 W. Kensington Road, Los Angeles, CA, 90026, a private residence in Echo Park. We are open by appointment only. For more information, please email: [email protected]

left- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Captain Bob Hyde Disappeared at Manhattan Beach, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.; right- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Natalie Wood Disappeared off Catalina Island, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.

left- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Captain Bob Hyde Disappeared at Manhattan Beach, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.; right- Zoe Crosher, Transgressing the Pacific: Where Natalie Wood Disappeared off Catalina Island, from the series LA-LIKE, 2008. Fujiflex archive print, 40 x 40 in.

BREAKING NEWS: ZOE CROSHER, SAYRE GOMEZ AND J PATRICK WALSH III – GALA PREMIER AT LAS CIENEGAS PROJECTS, SATURDAY NIGHT!

Quoting now from a NoL report already underway:

“… he saw a dozen great violet shafts of light moving across the evening sky in wide crazy sweeps. Whenever one of the fiery columns reached the lowest point of its arc, it lit for a moment the rose-colored domes and delicate minarets of Steven Hull’s and Amy Thoner’s  Las Cienegas Projects. The purpose of this display was to signal the world premiere of a new exhibition. (…) Although it was several hours before the celebrity artists would arrive, thousands of people had already gathered. They stood facing the gallery with their backs toward the gutter in a thick line hundreds of yards long. (…) People shouted… there was a continuous roar of catcalls, laughter and yells, pierced occasionally by a scream. The scream was usually followed by a sudden movement in the dense mass and part of it would surge forward wherever the police line was weakest…. A young man with a portable microphone was describing the scene. His rapid, hysterical voice was like that of a revivalist preacher whipping his congregation toward the ecstasy of fits. ‘What a crowd folks! What a crowd! There must be ten thousand excited, screaming people outside LCP tonight. the police can’t hold ’em. Here, listen to them roar.’.. It’s bedlam, folks.”


In point of fact my friends, I am cheerfully quoting from Nathanael West’s The Day of the Locust, the most fun you can have in 200 pages. I’ll continue briefly:

“New groups, whole families kept arriving. He could see a change come over them as soon as they had become part of the crowd. Until they reached the line, they looked diffident, almost furtive, but the moment they had become part of it, they turned arrogant and pugnacious… Once there (in California), they discover that sunshine isn’t enough. they get tired of oranges, even of avocado pears and passion fruit…. Their boredom becomes more and more terrible. They realize they’ve been tricked and they burn with resentment. Every day of their lives they read the newspapers and went to the movies. Both fed them on lynchings, murder, sex, crimes, explosions, wrecks, love nests, fires, miracles, revolutions, wars. This daily diet made sophisticates of them. The sun is a joke… (…) Nothing can ever be violent enough to make taut their slack minds and bodies.” (Don’t you love this sentence??????)

And what, one may ask, does any this have to do with Zoe Crosher, Sayre Gomez and J Patrick Walsh III? Lord in heaven, I don’t know. A scene just like West described above sprang into my mind when I clicked on the LCP website. Amy Thoner and Zoe Crosher – elegant and graceful in shimmering evening gowns,  the gentlemen in dinner jackets, all striding along a red carpet waving to the crowd, smiling and acknowledging the fans….

Go with it, I always say. Cheers.

And now a quote from Walsh and the venerable H.L. Mencken, provided for your consideration by Gomez and Walsh III as part of their joint statement:

The speed at which we comprehend the letter Z and assign its task, whether as a hairpin turn or the beginning of a snooze, presents us with countless direct possibilities for interpretation.  As the least used letter in the alphabet, Z can be compared to an ex-planet like Pluto, whose questionable stature seems to also walk the line between inclusion and exclusion. If you were to approach the letter Z at 500 miles per hour, what type of memory would you be left with as you pass through its jagged shape?
Language and speed are inherently connected. The rate at which one can receive messages is constantly increasing, coded characters continuously flung at greater invisible speeds. As I pass the road sign for ZZYZX at 100mph, I think briefly about a 1920’s spa, I listen to the music in my car, I text, and I smoke. All of this is liquefied in the desert sun. Is this so-called town at the end of the dictionary worth visiting? Maybe I would enjoy this experience more if my car was spinning seemingly out of control.            -J. Patrick Walsh III
“Poetry, in fact, is two quite distinct things. It may be either or both. One is a series of words that are intrinsically musical, in clang-tint and rhythm, as the single word cellar-door is musical. The other is a series of ideas, false in themselves, that offer a means of emotional and imaginative escape from the harsh realities of everyday.”
-H. L. Mencken

Marc Foxx, Next Season and Frances Stark My Best Thing.

Latned Atsar, Brevity of Names still is an opportunity for viewing and now I have images. Yay.

Frank Ryan, City of Los Angeles, graphite on rag paper. A quiet moment in a passageway to Ryan's installation of paintings, this drawing feels very alive. The paper is thick and textured and exhibits strength and fragility like human skin - the graphite rubbing is, well, rubbing - an action which can be interpreted in all or any of the several possible ways to understand this verb.

Frank Ryan, City of Los Angeles, graphite on rag paper. A quiet moment in a passageway to Ryan's installation of paintings, this drawing feels very alive. The paper is thick and textured and exhibits strength and fragility like human skin - the graphite rubbing is, well, rubbing - an action which can be interpreted in all or any of the several possible ways to understand this verb.

Frank Ryan's work in Sumi ink on yellow Japanese paper. All titled Mask.

Frank Ryan's work in Sumi ink on yellow Japanese paper. All titled Mask.

Standing alone, one of Ryan's Mask Sumi ink drawings.

Standing alone, one of Ryan's Mask Sumi ink drawings.

Ryan again, three small paintings about the childhood song, "How Much Wood Could A Woodchuck Chuck, If A Woodchuck..."

Ryan again, three small paintings about the childhood song, "How Much Wood Could A Woodchuck Chuck, If A Woodchuck..."

Don Suggs, one of his Feast Poles.

Don Suggs, one of his Feast Poles.

Don Suggs, installation view at Latned Atsar

Don Suggs, installation view at Latned Atsar

Gotta fly, dinner guests tonight.

have fun!

Geoff

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *