a few new places for images

Eadweard Muybridge, ANIMAL LOCOMOTION, 1887. From the website of Laurence Shafe, which is here-in linked.

Eadweard Muybridge, ANIMAL LOCOMOTION, 1887. From the website of Laurence Shafe, which is here-in linked.

Piet Mondrian, WINDMILL IN SUNLIGHT, 1905, also from Shafe. Again linked.

Piet Mondrian, WINDMILL IN SUNLIGHT, 1905, also from Shafe. Again linked.

Another Mondrian, THE GREY TREE, 1912. Shafe.

Another Mondrian, THE GREY TREE, 1912. Shafe.

Charline von Heyl, DUSTY DAFNI, Acrylic on linen 82 x 72 inches  Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen. This painting is currently on view at 1301 PE, link to same.

Charline von Heyl, DUSTY DAFNI, Acrylic on linen 82 x 72 inches Courtesy of the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles. Photographer: Fredrik Nilsen. This painting is currently on view at 1301 PE, link to same.

Marsden Hartley, LANDSCAPE, NEW MEXICO, 1923, oil on canvas. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn

Marsden Hartley, LANDSCAPE, NEW MEXICO, 1923, oil on canvas. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn

, 1904 albumen silver print. Image from and link to Amon Carter Museum.”]Thomas W. Smillie, W.L. SNOW [PROFILE IN NAVY UNIFORM], 1904 albumen silver print. Image from and link to Amon Carter Museum.
Will Barnet (1911- ); Self-Portrait; 1948-1949; Oil on canvas; Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; 1999.5

Will Barnet (1911- ); Self-Portrait; 1948-1949; Oil on canvas; Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; 1999.5

John McLaughlin, Untitled, ca. 1946-1949 Oil and tempera on composition board 20 in. x 24 in. (50.8 cm x 60.96 cm) Crocker Art Museum, anonymous gift

John McLaughlin, Untitled, ca. 1946-1949 Oil and tempera on composition board 20 in. x 24 in. (50.8 cm x 60.96 cm) Crocker Art Museum, anonymous gift

Jess (American, 1923-2004) Feignting Spell, 1954 Oil on canvas 48 in. x 42 in. (121.92 cm x 106.68 cm) Crocker Art Museum, partial gift of the Jess Collins Trust with contributions from the George and Bea Gibson Fund, Marcy and Mort Friedman Acquisition Fund, Rose Huckins Memorial Fund, and the Michael Himovitz Fund. Link to Crocker Museum

Jess (American, 1923-2004) Feignting Spell, 1954 Oil on canvas 48 in. x 42 in. (121.92 cm x 106.68 cm) Crocker Art Museum, partial gift of the Jess Collins Trust with contributions from the George and Bea Gibson Fund, Marcy and Mort Friedman Acquisition Fund, Rose Huckins Memorial Fund, and the Michael Himovitz Fund. Link to Crocker Museum

Roy De Forest (American, 1930-2007) Recollections of a Sword Swallower, 1968 Polymer and glitter on canvas 62 1/4 in. x 62 1/2 in. (158.12 cm x 158.75 cm) Crocker Art Museum Purchase with funds from the Maude T. Pook Acquisition Fund

Roy De Forest (American, 1930-2007) Recollections of a Sword Swallower, 1968 Polymer and glitter on canvas 62 1/4 in. x 62 1/2 in. (158.12 cm x 158.75 cm) Crocker Art Museum Purchase with funds from the Maude T. Pook Acquisition Fund

Sam Richardson, That’s a Small Island with Snow and Frozen Water, circa 1970-75 Acrylic and Plexiglas Collection of the San Jose Museum of Art Gift of the artist and Adrienne Richardson from Mediachef Flickr stream.

Sam Richardson, That’s a Small Island with Snow and Frozen Water, circa 1970-75 Acrylic and Plexiglas Collection of the San Jose Museum of Art Gift of the artist and Adrienne Richardson from Mediachef Flickr stream.

Sam Richardson (American, b. 1934) There's an Extended Cloud over that Mountain cast polyfoam fiberglass 19½ x 42½ x 24½ in. (49.6 x 108 x 62.2 cm.), including base. Executed in 1969. Image from a pretty great 2010 Christie's Auction, link.

Sam Richardson (American, b. 1934) There's an Extended Cloud over that Mountain cast polyfoam fiberglass 19½ x 42½ x 24½ in. (49.6 x 108 x 62.2 cm.), including base. Executed in 1969. Image from a pretty great 2010 Christie's Auction, link.

About the above Charline von Heyl painting, Dusty Dafni. In her Hammer/UCLA talk von Heyl mentioned that painting and its relation to her stay at Marfa – it seems while she was there much of Texas was burning. The image of a tree blowing in the wind outside her residence window stuck with her and leaked out while she painted this painting. She was surprised to find such clear representation within her practice. It is interesting to me that another abstract-ish painter that I know, during a recent Marfa residency also began to paint from his surroundings. A body of work that this painter developed while at the residency had direct connection to the buildings on the site and the details of the architecture. Is there something about Marfa, basically a center for late abstract or at least Non-objective art, that inspires current abstract artists of note to find new directions? Hmm.

Along that train of thought, I offer you several links: Charline von Heyl at the Hammer UCLA Department of Art Lectures, Steve Roden on Proximities and Site Dependent work.

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