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End of June beginning of July, 2011

Hello, hello. If we’re paying attention we all know that this is the final weekend for William Leavitt at MOCA. Related musical events are happening this weekend, Cage will be played among others. “the wulf” will be present!!!! Yay! I’m sorry that I’m going away. Sad me. Also, although you wouldn’t know it unless you found the information somewhere other than the Municipal Art Gallery website, this is the closing weekend of this year’s COLA exhibition. That is, City of Los Angeles Grant, for artists in various media. Christopher Knight in the LA Times said good things, here. Do you know – sometime during the course of 2011 a raucous ruckus was raised that “WE MUST STOP MOCA FROM TAKING OVER BARNSDALL!!!” I wondered then why the fuss and I wonder even more now. Given the current state of the institution and the space, MOCA would be doing us a favor to run it as an auxiliary exhibition gallery. I want to earnestly congratulate the artists who have been selected for the grant but also I feel badly that they are showing in the most negligent space in the city. “Sure (the City of Los Angeles tells them), I’ll give you a generous grant, but you must use it to make work and we will present in such a way that it looks awkward and is difficult to visit.” It is time to revisit this COLA tradition as well as the need for a municipal art gallery in Los Angeles. Give artists grants and set them free to do what they will with the money. Find some local institution...

“Home Show” 1988 again

Hi friends, Thanks to the valiant searches of my friends at the Contemporary Arts Forum I am able to share images of the 1988 installations. If you require a refresher, see the bottom of this post for links to past Home Show posts including writing on the two historical shows, 1988 and 1993. I’ve a copy of the catalog in my hand and the power of internet searches, using these resources I’ll give you as much of a complete understanding (of the 1988 exhibition) as I am able. Exhibition curator Betty Klausner states in her forward, “I recognized the brilliance of the concept (artist’s installations made public in private homes) and the appropriateness of it for Santa Barbara.” Her reference is to a 1986 New York Times article about a similar exhibition in Ghent. Klausner does not go on to elucidate her certainty of the city’s aptness for the project, but having now experienced Miki Garcia’s “Home Show, Revisited” (closing on July 21), and having also visited Santa Barbara several times, and studied up on the exhibitions and on the city, I recognize that part of the allure for the show is the city’s insular and somewhat xenophobic psychology. Who doesn’t want to poke around in the homes of others? And especially others who hold themselves apart. As it happens the alphabet gives me my favorite image first, Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler’s “Picture Out of Doors.” This is so simple an idea, to remove all the doors in the house and line them up in the living room. And it opens out in my head so, so sweetly...

Something(s) I learned today

Apologies to Hüsker Dü for ripping off their title, or consider the title an homage to their spirit – whichever feels appropriate. (As a hero-worshiping queer, I offer you the very song live in Philly in 1983 via YouTube. Enjoy.) Matt Chambers and Alexander Wolff are collaborating on an exhibition at Steve Turner, opening July 16. This I learned (more about) today. Shall I tell you stuff? Not now I shan’t! As I see it I have twenty-five days to tease you, to drop hints, upload the occasional image, and dangle a potent quote to two. How’s this one for example, “Our collaboration is only good because we fight so much. The paintings we delivered yesterday still look like they’re fighting!” Quoting from the library’s website, “In 1929 Surrealist artist Max Ernst published the first of a series of collage novels.” and continuing, “This was to be ‘the ideal picture book of this age’, and the future was to leap forth from it. ‘Children’s eyes, wide with awe, that open like butterflies’ wings on the shore of a lake’. The time had now come – according to the introduction – for ‘the first hundred visions of fairies’. These prophetic words came from André Breton, the executuve director of surrealism.” What a bizarre and lovely idea, that an anti-bourgeois, avant garde art movement might style their intellectual leader an “executive director.” Of course there is an overbearing quality to this also, as perhaps there was to Breton himself. There was an awful lot of exclusion among the members of that movement. Cool images though. Link to bibliotheek website with additional images and...

Available this weekend

Statler Waldorf Gallery have a show opening Friday, June 17. Over the City and Through the Woods, curated by Fritz Chesnut and Molly Larkey with work by Claude Collins-Stracensky, Bryan de Roo, Drew Heitzler, Oliver Irwin, Marie Jager, Gordon Matta-Clark, John Opera and Colin Roberts. A note about Statler-Waldorf: S-W is an artist-run exhibition space located at 1098 W. Kensington Road, Los Angeles, CA, 90026, a private residence in Echo Park. We are open by appointment only. For more information, please email: [email protected] BREAKING NEWS: ZOE CROSHER, SAYRE GOMEZ AND J PATRICK WALSH III – GALA PREMIER AT LAS CIENEGAS PROJECTS, SATURDAY NIGHT! Quoting now from a NoL report already underway: “… he saw a dozen great violet shafts of light moving across the evening sky in wide crazy sweeps. Whenever one of the fiery columns reached the lowest point of its arc, it lit for a moment the rose-colored domes and delicate minarets of Steven Hull’s and Amy Thoner’s  Las Cienegas Projects. The purpose of this display was to signal the world premiere of a new exhibition. (…) Although it was several hours before the celebrity artists would arrive, thousands of people had already gathered. They stood facing the gallery with their backs toward the gutter in a thick line hundreds of yards long. (…) People shouted… there was a continuous roar of catcalls, laughter and yells, pierced occasionally by a scream. The scream was usually followed by a sudden movement in the dense mass and part of it would surge forward wherever the police line was weakest…. A young man with a portable microphone was describing the...

The only place in LA to see Unfinished Paintings and have a critical dialogue about them

Good Lord my friends, I am losing track of important exhibitions, and so missing out on alerting you to GOOD STUFF. Two are the many openings at LACE tonight: Unfinished Paintings, curated by Kristin Calabrese and Joshua Aster. To my mind LACE is the only place that would be able to host this exhibition, which asks artists to share with the public works in progress. How tantalizing, and what a generous idea for an exhibition. LACE, with its history of supportive engagement with artists is just the place for a painter to feel the trust – and to inspire the audience to engage with respect. Awesome work Kristin and Joshua. Lisa Adams, Joshua Aster, Nina Bovasso, Delia Brown, Kristin Calabrese, Sarah Cromarty, Sydney Croskery, Noah Davis, Gerald Davis, Mark Dutcher, Mari Eastman, Brad Eberhard, Bart Exposito, Michelle Grabner, Alex Grey, James Hayward, Salomon Huerta, Xylor Jane, Valerie Jaudon, Chris Johanson, Annie Lapin, Jose Lerma, Caitlin Lonegan, Dan McCleary, Shiri Mordechay, Loren Munk, Laurie Nye, Eamon Ore-Giron, Susie Rosmarin, Frank Ryan, David Ryan, Katia Santibañez, Kenny Scharf, Cary Smith, Linda Stark, Don Suggs, Mitchell Wright, and Brenna Youngblood. Speculative, curated by Christopher O’Leary and Zachary Blas. Casey Alt, Zach Blas, Jeff Cain, Micha Cardenas & Elle Mehrmand, Xarene Eskandar, Michael Kontopoulos, Christopher O’Leary, Claudia Salamanca, and Pinar Yoldas. I do not know anything more about Speculative. I certainly will tomorrow after the opening tonight!!! I’ve got some groceries to put away – more images in a...

Charline von Heyl at 1301PE

Because it is in my mind right now, I offer you Tristan Murail, Désintégrations part one, Désintégrations part two and Désintégrations part three. A thought, for those of you who spend time with Notes – do you remember the Joseph Beuys chimney sculpture image in the Florian Morlat post? Check out the yellow shape in the painting from Charline von Heyl’s new show above. To me it speaks of Beuys’ sculpture at the Kunstsammlung NRW in Dusseldorf. I got an email yesterday announcing the extension through July 1 of Charline von Heyl’s exhibition at 1301PE. Good news.  Some of us have been waiting since her Spring, 2007 show Small Paintings at this same space. I recall that in ’07 when the angel and I climbed the stairs at 1301 we hadn’t heard of von Heyl and had no idea what to expect. Oh boy. We saw wonderful abstract paintings, paintings that seemed to be without a burdensome reliance on past abstract practice. I also didn’t get a sense that the artist was using any particular system to create these images; rather, she was responding to movements on the canvas: make a mark, respond, advance that thought, abandon it when it gets too strong, etc. Having seen the new show, I can look back and recognize that among the universe of possible responses in von Heyl’s painting language she includes a willingness to grab imagery from the world around her and uses them almost like another type of brush stroke or color choice. What does not show in the above images from Small Paintings are the many techniques for laying...

Around this berg – mid June

We went out with our friends Michael and Sirje Gold this weekend, to a-see what we could see. We traveled first down Crenshaw, over the giant land-scar of the 10 and past The Living Room Bar with its bluesy rep and occasional night-time dj setup on the front sidewalk. We were having a great time – we were laughing more than talking, and talking more shit than anything. (When equally cynical friends from the same small world get together, all the good gossip comes out!) Left we turned, onto Jefferson and we parked behind 3222 Jefferson to see “Brevity of Names” at Latned Atsar. Frank Ryan, Don Suggs and Rob Thom have work in the show, I would have images but…. I am notoriously slow to remember to photograph things. Sad for me and for you. I am able to scope out a Frank Ryan image online, see above. This is kind of an all UCLA show – Suggs did both undergrad and grad there and Thom and Ryan are both UCLA MFA also. Probably not entirely coincidentally Nathan Danilowicz, whose space Latned Atsar is, got his MFA at UCLA. The work? More about it in a while when I get images. Gotta return for ’em. Show is up for another few weeks. West we headed, Adams to San Vicente to La Brea to 3rd, turn right and park immediately. Dan Weinberg. Yes, he’s back, this time at 5658 West 3rd Street. Showing now are new paintings by Andrew Masullo. (Weird the way these images upload with the white bottom border…) Also Weinberg is still maintaining an office at...

The weekend, the time we have, the more

Hi friends, First off, a big old plug for my friend Karl Erickson and the DUMBO Arts Center: DUMBO SECRET GARDEN pARTy 2 is happening next weekend, Thursday June 16, 6 to 10 pm. Of course there’s a benefit auction and of course you may bid from afar, click here for an Absentee Bid Form and to begin the process of saving culture in the city where people go to miss LA. Oh gosh, I am just now checking 0ut the temptations on offer and finding such familiar and exciting names as LEE BONTECUE, and JIM DINE, and JILL NEWMAN, and LARRY RIVERS, and LAURIE NYE, and ZOE CROSHER (freaking ZOE CROSHER for crying out loud!!!!), SCOTT CALHOUN, RUSSELL NACHMAN, DIANA COOPER, RICHARD JOCHUM, RICHARD STANKIEWICZ, ALEX HAY, (okay Geoff enough already!!!!) By the way, you video artists out there check out the open call for entries for Video DUMBO 2011: Entry form here. Details after the jump. Deadline is June 30. Go for it. It’s 9 am on Friday, I’m ditching you for a while. Back. G Aaaand, he’s back. Back in LA: “hate California, it’s cold and it’s damp” and it certainly is right now! June gloom prevails and it gets steamy hot in the afternoon. Whoa, all the way up to 55% humidity and 80 degrees. What on earth are we going to do this weekend? There are two painting shows that I want to write about and if I mention them I’ve learned that I’m likely not to write anything more. Sad over-promising me. In the meantime, have I mentioned to you the COLA show?...

Evan Holloway: Art History = Successful Products + Time (a smorgasbord)

Hey friends – pretend it’s London and it’s 1984. Somewhere outside the window (we have a place in London now – a basement flat, foot level window on the street, open to the pungent London summer) people are talking – we begin to make out language so we follow the words/they capture our minds/intrigued, we all want to see as much as hear/up, we peer  through our opening, pressing our chests to the clammy wall/Aah! We catch a glimpse of shod feet: one rough and tumble skinny ankle black laced boot and one pair of tattered moccasins, stained and worn. We watch as these two characters dance their words. In this pas de deux Skinny Boot Person leads and Old Soft Shoes follows. [the following text is courtesy the English band Long Pig and KPFK’s Andrea ‘enthal and her 1980’s radio show Twelve O’Clock Rock) It goes: SkBP: I want you to talk to me. OSS: I talk to you. SkBP: Alright, um, right. I want you to say this thing with me: “Why do people find each other strange? I can’t tell one derange from another derange.” Can you say that? OSS: Whatisdis? SkBP: “Why do people find each other strange?” OSS: Why do peepil SkBP: Why do people OSS: Why do people SkBP: …find each other strange. OSS: each othur strng SkBP: I can’t tell OSS: can’t tell SkBP: one derange from another derange OSS: ????????? (laughter from somewhere) SkBP: Why do people (drum beat starts) find each other strange I can’t tell one derange….. On it goes into the night. One of the things we talked...

Sam Richardson, his work that I know

I uploaded a couple of images of Sam’s work yesterday – he’s one of the artists in California who I admire most. I love this early sculptural work and also his interesting approach to environmental art. I may have trouble finding images for him, this work somehow fell out of favor in the last forty years. I wonder why? Fortunately the world is such that good work stays around to be discovered anew each time another person experiences it. For this body of work the Smithsonian has the following story on their website: Sam Richardson’s Sierra Series was the result of a happy accident. While traveling across the country, a storm caused his plane to change direction and fly over an area of the Rockies. Richardson had seen the mountains from the ground before, and always had been fascinated with the formation of the snowdrifts, but seeing these from above gave him a new perspective. Pieces in the Sierra Series are composed from a thin layer of plastic that has been formed and painted to resemble delicate peaks and ridges of snow. This is a story I have read in other places and also heard from Sam himself. His first-person telling of it, filled with the enthusiasm of discovery was quite charming. Imagine the old days, in a propeller plane traveling over mountains and thinking. Remember what we know about James Turrell and his plane-bound discoveries. Cool. Link to Rocor’s Flickr stream here. As and if I find additional images, and perhaps scan or photograph the catalogs that I have, I’ll put up more about Richardson. Cheers,...