All notes from Archives | Notes on Looking

Thanks to the careful ministrations of good friends…

I can now snip and grab and pillage images with absolutely NO TROUBLE AT ALLLLLLLLLLL. Yay! Credit for my new skill goes entirely to Andrew Berardini and Amy Thoner, who separately, kindly, emailed me suggestions and instructions and links to FAQS. Life just gets better and better. Can I also take a moment to publicly thank Dennis Hollingsworth for  putting Notes on Looking front and center on his own blog in a recent post? There, I did so. Thank you Dennis. Now for those lost images from Brianna Gorton’s...

Weekend of March 30(ish) through April 3(give or take)

Good Lord my friends, I feel out of sorts. No real reason, just existential… ennui??? (Is “existential ennui” redundant or a is it double negative?) Returning from vacation, transitioning from colder to warmer weather – all my clothes are fitting funny and so are habits and ideas. Eek. But then…. Hah! Once again things to which I may look forward are appearing in my mind’s eye. (In the interest of revealing my sources, I must tell you that some of what I am mentioning – with such a breathless delivery – I picked up by checking Artcards LA. THEY have direct links outside of their own website. I appreciate this.) The above-mentioned Zachary Leener is showing “New California Pieces” at Iko Iko Space in Silverlake. Leener’s ceramic sculptures will be paired with sculptural furniture by Waka Waka. It my good fortune to have visited Zach’s studio at UCR in January. Were I the clever puppy that I wish, I would have taken photos and notes. Um, I didn’t – and perhaps how awkward if I had. (Maybe experiences are essentially unshareable) …..but if you come to Iko Iko on Saturday (or in any clearly defined but unknown to me period after this date) you’ll be able to share a similar experience with Zachary Leener’s pretty wonderful art. So okay, a few things about Zachary Leener’s work that I can relate: see those sculptures in the photo above? Yes, they are small enough to hold in your hand but they are also deceptively heavy and solid to the touch. And yes, these sculptures are full of personality. If you’ve ever seen...

Jeremy Denk and magic

Hi friends, We saw Jeremy Denk play Beethoven’s 1st Piano Concerto at Disney Hall this past Sunday (March 20). There was other music but Denk and his piano stole my heart. I recognized the music when the orchestra began, and the LA Phil always plays beautifully. Everything was gorgeous. Happy me. Then Jeremy Denk started playing and sparks started to fly. He seemed so very in love with what he was doing, and so very pleased to be doing it. For us. Honestly I had the thought that he was giving us a gift and was grateful to be able to give it. In piano concertos there are long passages of solo piano. I know that sometimes these parts may be improvised by the musician. I do not know whether this is true of Concerto No. 1. I can tell you that there was a huge middle section of Denk’s playing, oh god it went on for minutes and minutes of glorious weirdness, and what he played sounded like nothing I’d ever heard before. I’ve listened to this piece several times, twice before live, and I have never been so surprised and had my attention riveted like this before. Good Lord, then later on towards the end he did it again!!! Denk’s body language totally communicated, too. His face, his head and torso and his feet all moving and expressing – this man was soooooo performing for us. What a show! At the end, some 1500 newly committed Denksters stood and cheered, and then cheered more and more loudly. We were lusty, even. I felt that I could finally...

update on Philip Glass and Akhnaten

Okay. Philip Glass does not speak in arpeggios. As I illustrated last week with extensive quotes, Glass is a fascinating and generous speaker. There are partisans on both sides of teh “Glass divide” even these many years on, always willing to argue the finer points of Glass’s music. Who has time? Go back to the previous two posts and listen to the music that is linked. I defy you not to find it beautiful and to be moved. “Window of Appearances,” the Love Duet, “Funeral of Amonhotep III,” and on and on. We bought the cd of this opera in 2003ish after the LA Phil’s Minimalism Jukebox festival and then played it in the car for probably 5 years whole. You know how much time David and I spend in the car so figure that adds up to more than one hundred complete listenings. I never became bored. The music still thrills me. Eek indeed. Do I think that I or you must love everything that Glass has written? Good lord. Why make such demands on yourself or on an artist? But if you love music then you are missing out unless you try. D and I saw the Long Beach Opera production of Akhnaten on Saturday. We had a blast, and I am speaking as a devotee of a particular recording – from which the current production varies quite a bit. You’ve got another chance to see it yourself this coming Sunday. Long Beach Opera, Sunday March 27 Akhnaten by Philip Glass. Thanks again and have fun listening, Geoff Tuck Philip Glass 1 Philip Glass 2 Philip Glass...

Native Strategies – Brian Getnick helps us look at Performance Art in LA

First off, I offer you several notes from conversations and email with Brian Getnick, beginning in December, 2010 and continuing through March, 2011: “Dear artist,” Getnick begins in that first email back in December… “I’d like to invite you to participate in a performance series I’ve organized with fellow curators Zemula Barr and Molly Sullivan at LACE for March and April of 2011 titled So Funny It Hurts. The show will feature 2 artists paired for 4 nights on Thursday evenings (March 10 and 24, April 4 and 14). Each night’s show will run approximately 2 hours with the possibility of a Q and A afterwords. As part of the show, a catalog will be produced containing images of your work as well as an interview with each of you. One of our main priorities is to generate critical writing about your work and have it contained in the catalog. This show aims to fill a gap of (in print) critical inquiry into Los Angeles based performance which explodes conventional definitions of performance art, theater, humor, and spectacle.” And a bit later, “Second, I’ve decided the publication will be volume one of a biannual journal on performance art in Los Angeles. Each journal examines contemporary movements in Angeleno performance art spanning generations, ethnicity, gendered communities and folk cultures.” And later still, “The working title for this series is “Native Strategies”. Each issue will be released in concert with a curated show of the same title and contain interviews conducted with the artists, images of their work and short essays. Volume one of Native Strategies is appropriately titled “So Funny...

More Glass pages

Hymn to the Aten text: Thou dost appear beautiful On the horizon of heaven Oh, living Aten He who was the first to live When thou hast risen on the Eastern Horizon Thou art fair, great, dazzling, High above every land Thy rays encompass the land To the very end of all thou hast made All the beasts are satisfied with their pasture Trees and plants are verdant Birds fly from their nests, wings spread Flocks skip with their feet All that fly and alight Live when thou hast arisen How manifold is that which thou hast made Thou sole God There is no other like thee Thou didst create the earth According to thy will Being alone, everything on earth Which walks and flies on high Thy rays nourish the fields When thou dost rise They live and thrive for thee Thou makest the seasons to nourish All thou hast made The winter to cool The heat that they may taste thee There is no other that knows thee Save thy son, Akhnaten For thou hast made him skilled In thy plans and thy might Thou dost raise him up for thy son Who comes forth from thyself Which Glass follows with a quote (in Hebrew and English) from the New Testament: Oh Lord, how manifold are Thy works In wisdom hast Thou made them all The earth is full of Thy riches Who coverest Thyself with light as with a garment Who stretchest out the Heavens like a curtain Thou makest darkness and it is night Wherin all the beasts of the forest do creep forth Ma rab-bu...

Philip Glass at LACMA and Akhnaten at the LBO (made sticky on February

Open are the double doors of the horizon Unlocked are its bolts Clouds darken the sky The stars rain down The constellations stagger The bones of the hell hounds tremble The porters are silent When they see this king Dawning as a soul Men fall Their name is not Seize thou this king by his arm Take this king to the sky That he not die on earth Among men He flies who flies This king flies away from you Ye mortals He is not of the earth He is of the sky He flaps his wings like a zeret bird He goes to the sky He goes to the sky On the wind On the wind Philip Glass spoke to a pretty full house in the Bing Theater at LACMA on Saturday, March 12. Exciting was the afternoon! To be clear, Glass was engaged in conversation with the Long Beach Opera’s Music Director Andreas Mitisek but I think Mitisek will understand that Glass took most of my vision and attention. Glass told his by now familiar to most of us story of growing up in Baltimore, studying music, moving to NY, taxi driving, etc. Then he spoke of his studies with Nadia Boulanger. And what does one learn from Boulanger? “She taught nothing of composition. Boulanger taught me (Glass) to unlearn what I had worked so hard to gain in school. Then she taught me to listen, to hear and to visualize music. This has been most important to me – an ability to visualize music.” (I am sad to report that Glass did not describe what he...

steve roden: “stone’s throw” – lowercase mad chill (Updated 3-24-11)

I wonder if it would be interesting to post images of work that I know, or guess, an artist might appreciate. Workthat perhaps has influenced an artist. Hmm. Let’s find out! I’m posting today images, music links and anything I can think of that Steve Roden has indicated to me as worth thinking about in the past decade. Here we go. Beginning with a few James Brown songs. What? You may wonder? Steve is so… quiet, not to say, well, not James. Aah – but I have heard the stories of a pink mohawked baby punker getting of a jet plane from London in 1980. I suspect beneath that quite exterior, somewhere lurks a guy in pointy shoes dancing his butt off and basically stealing the show. Papa’s got a brand new bag Please, please, please The big payback Steve wrote about the above Lorser Feitelson painting in this morning’s LA Times, in the recurring column It Speaks To Me. I read a great post in Steve’s blog in October 2009 that has him comparing this painting to an albumen print photograph he picked up at a swap meet. I’ve linked to this post in the past and quite likely I shall again. You should treasure it the way I do. Hey – what about music? Um, gee. Morton Feldman’s Piano Four Hands, anyone? More after work. XXOO Update on March 24 in the morning: Okay, so it is waaay after work and I’ve added nothing. Sad world. For solace, check out the studio visit pics. For heaven’s sakes also check out Roden’s exhibition at Vielmetter. Yay. Cheerful new things...