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Sarah Cain, Santa Barbara and the trees around your neighborhood

Over the span of this single week my friends, spring has announced itself. Sunday morning while on our walk David and I noticed green buds on the local sycamore trees and also tiny flower buds sprouting on the mock oranges. Yesterday the sycamores were already leafed out and the scent of mock orange blossoms had become a delicate but definite presence in the ‘hood. And this morning, with the oncoming rain, the moist air carried that scent much farther and also mixed in white sage from the house down the street. Good Lord my friends, this is heaven. (A quick update: getting on the Hollywood Fwy at Echo Park this afternoon I saw wisteria blooming. Really, really pale and stringy wisteria – but still. Yay.) Last Sunday afternoon, under clear skies and with views of many snowy mountains, I swooped eastward on Sunset Blvd from Echo Park to North Spring Street in Chinatown. Way up the street I stopped my car adjacent the still new looking Historical Park and met Sarah Cain outside her studio. Yay. Cain has an exhibition that I’m looking forward to at the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum next weekend – so I’m taking the opportunity to visit SB, and OF COURSE I’m also going to see the Charles Garabedian show at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. A brief digression on Garabedian and curator Julie Joyce. Garabedian is one of the many artists who studied and began practicing art making after World War II. Garabedian is one who early chose not to pursue abstraction with his painting and, later, did not move into a conceptual...

More fixings!

June 3, 2010, which like all my posts is a chain letter of love for the LA art community – has been entirely relinked, tuned up and polished. 3200 words, with forty-five-ish hyperlinks. Hot diggity freaking dog. What are the highlights from that long ago post? Gaylen Gerber, Kathryn Andrews and Matteo Tannat in “Support Group” at Cottage Home. (In my memory one of the best exhibitions anywhere last year.) Actual Size, initial contact. The 2009 show featured Autumn Ramsey and Tyson Reeder. The Sizer’s once again this month have an exhibition that to me sounds great: “Angle of Incidence,” with work by Larry Fink, Alex Prager and J. Patrick Walsh. Fink you must know, Prager too – unless you just don’t pay any attention at all. Walsh, I’m told is a grad student at USC. I found a curious 2007 interview with Walsh talking about Busters Magazine on YouTube. I also find text and another video – these from Chicago’s Monument 2 – about “Our First Sixty Nine,” an exhibition Walsh did with Natalie Labriola. A 2009 exhibition, “Kitten” with Andres Laracuente, Matthew Lutz-Kinoy and JPW3 at NY’s Thrust Projects, which is now Jane Kim Gallery. Larry Mullins at Blythe Projects in Culver City.It seems like Blythe Projects is quiet until March 19th when “Perception,” a group show curated by Michael Salvatore Tierney opens. Robert Heinecken at Cherry and Martin. And now in 2010 you can see two exhibitions of Heinecken work: Cherry and Martin and Marc Selwyn. Opening Saturday and Friday, respectively. There was also a fantasy story about David and me getting puking drunk at Mandrake and then fist-fighting about conceptual art...

Occasional news of repairing links

Hi there readers. I noticed traffic to two links that hadn’t been updated since my old email days. These from the March 4, 2010 post. Both posts were related to photographer Mark McKnight, the first went to a San Francisco Chronicle review of a group exhibition: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/08/19/NSDI1989D2.DTL and the second to a page on the Shane Lavalette Journal http://www.shanelavalette.com/journal/2008/02/05/mark-mcknight-this-dust-makes-that-mud/  I’ve repaired the links in the original post, if you are curious about the context I invite you to travel back in time: http://notesonlooking.com/?p=142 If you’re interested in additional McKnight info, he had work at Roberts and Tilton in Noah Davis’s “Gray Day” group exhibition. The only image is on the “checklist” pdf and is very tiny. Enjoy your trip! I’ll continue to update links as I notice them fail… and I’ll let you know when I do...

Yeah, livin’ the life. Come to RAID next Saturday!

TEXT: the problem with writing about art – presented by Durden and Ray and the Torrance Art Museum TEXT – the problem with writing about art   TEXT brings together the viewpoints of an editor, an artist and a blogger for an open discussion about the state of art writing in LA, featuring:   Tulsa Kinney   Zak Smith   Geoff Tuck   moderated by RAID Projects Director, Jason Ramos   Saturday February 12th at 6pm at RAID Projects, 602 Moulton Avenue, Los Angeles 90031 presented by Durden and Ray and the Torrance Art Museum coinciding with the closing reception of Durden and Ray: Year One   Tulsa Kinney is the editor of Artillery, an art magazine based in Los Angeles she co-founded in 2006. She received her MFA at USC in 1988 and showed her paintings and videos in numerous solo and group exhibitions for over two decades. At that time she was teaching digital imaging at various Southern California colleges along with her graphic design career at the LA Weekly. Tulsa started writing about 10 years ago and her articles have been published in the Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly. She continues to write about art and stay deeply immersed in the contemporary art world.   Zak Smith is an artist who first came to prominence with his mammoth work Pictures Showing What Happens on Each Page of Thomas Pynchon’s Novel Gravity’s Rainbow. Smith’s paintings and drawings are held in major public and private collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art. We Did Porn — a book including drawings and stories about his experiences working in the adult film industry — his third...