10-7-10 more

Continuing in the same vein, which is a vein of cultural wonders that runs deep and true in Los Angeles. Just like the oil that once bubbled up to the surface beneath our feet, making (some) people rich – now ideas burst forth from the very air and from people’s minds and we are all enriched. (Wow. I make myself queasy sometimes.)

I’m not able to link to anything about this show because it’s in Young Chung’s apartment and he hasn’t set up a website. Yet.

You know, I completely retract my last statement. Commonwealth & Council does in fact have a website. Life continues to be good!

Gala Porras-Kim from the 2009 Cal Arts MFA show. "Why Theory." Image from Try Harder.

Gala Porras-Kim from the 2009 Cal Arts MFA show. "Why Theory." Image from Try Harder.

Gala Porras-Kim, “I Want to Prepare to Learn Something I Don’t Know.” I had the good luck to stand next to Porras-Kim at the Jesse Sugarmann car tipping performance a week or so ago at the opening of “Jerry/Jury Rigged” at Glendale College. Sorry about the heavy linking but… it’s what I do. To me each link is like a “get into the library free” card and you may learn just about anything by using it! Back to my story. Gala and I spoke a little, exchanged basic info, she shared with me astute and witty observations about the goings on – she spoke of her current project as offering a way for her to learn a way around a new neighborhood containing unfamiliar culture(s) and maybe bring some of us along, too. I’m pretty ready.

Gala Porras-Kim, again from the 2009 Cal Arts MFA show. "Why Theory." Image from Try Harder.

Gala Porras-Kim, again from the 2009 Cal Arts MFA show. "Why Theory." Image from Try Harder.

pulpa flesh,” with work by Erich Bollman, Koh Byoung Ok, and Maryrose Cobarrubias Mendoza. I’m only able to find unrelated images and then only from two of the artists. My apologies to Maryrose Cobarrubias Mendoza. I’m excited by what I read in the press release. I’m simply going to quote (text scattered among the images):

Erich Bollman "The Daddy Variations" 2010 Paper mache and paint Each shirt: 30 x 18 x 14 inches, Obviously I'm not that stumped for images. I found these on the GLAMFA 2010 website.

Erich Bollman "The Daddy Variations" 2010 Paper mache and paint Each shirt: 30 x 18 x 14 inches, Obviously I'm not that stumped for images. I found these on the GLAMFA 2010 website.

Erich Bollman "Strawberry Picnic (Us @ Dusk)" 2010 Wood, paper mache and paint 96 x 24 x 12 inches

Erich Bollman "Strawberry Picnic (Us @ Dusk)" 2010 Wood, paper mache and paint 96 x 24 x 12 inches

“Bollmann substitutes familiar objects, things and people with paper doppelgangers—pulp extracted, leaving only skeletal remains. Their exhumed, petrified fossils become uncanny, haunting the living and looking awry. These emptied vessels guide our exploration and search for knowledge and meaning in this world of the dying and the undead.”

Koh Byoung Ok, image from "H Sculpture Show" a one day exhibition curated by John Souza at Post. Link to show.

Koh Byoung Ok, image from "H Sculpture Show" a one day exhibition curated by John Souza at Post. Link to show.

Koh Byoung Ok, a piece titled "Two Thread Clock" from the "F Sculpture Show" at Angel's Gate Cultural Center

Koh Byoung Ok, a piece titled "Two Thread Clock" from the "F Sculpture Show" at Angel's Gate Cultural Center

“Koh contemplates our relationship to readymade objects through processes of removal (naked truth) and intimacy (close scrutiny). Whether he is removing the waxy coating (epidermis) of a milk carton with his nails to offer a “breathing space” or molding a napkin to the shape of a “sweating” soda can, Koh reveals the world of wonder that encompasses our daily lives and private rituals.”

“Mendoza painstakingly reconstructs the mundane and honors even the humblest subject with respect. Here she turns her attention to the back of a canvas—using pulp to create its texture, the wood grain on the stretcher bars and the staples. The piece reminds us of the unseen but essential parts that make art.”

So my friend Bari Ziperstein is collecting plates. Not just any plates but your plates. Dinnerware, luncheon size, doesn’t matter. For LACMA and for Fallen Fruit. EATLACMA is Fallen Fruit’s year long “investigation into food, art, culture and politics.” Ziperstein’s part in EATLACMA is to build a 1,095 given-by-various-friend-types plate mandala in 4 hours (maximum!) on November 7 in the Art of America Lobby at LACMA. Um, 3 meals a day for 365 days = 1,095 plates. This sound eerily reminiscent of the Tibetan monks who made the sand painting in the old atrium. Easier to laugh about, too.

Oh! Please don’t take your dishes to LACMA. Email Bari at [email protected] to arrange your donation.

Las Cienegas Projects has three new shows opening on Saturday, October 9. The Road to Hell is Paved…, James Benning, Isabell Heimerdinger. I know as much as you do. Go see and find out!

Cheers my friends, see you soon.

But first – Blinky Palermo at LACMA. Opens on October 31. Talk with curator Lynne Cooke, Mathias Poledna and Rhea Anastas next week on October 26. Lest you miss it.

Geoff Tuck

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