NoL – more in between, later on the 26th and early on the 27th

An Upright Plan Can Never Be a Downright Failure, 40"x50"x27", automotive enamel on car bomb fragment 2009. Image from Threadgill's site. I do believe this is the piece I saw in Opera at 533. Link to 533 so you can check it out.

An Upright Plan Can Never Be a Downright Failure, 40"x50"x27", automotive enamel on car bomb fragment 2009. Image from Threadgill's site. I do believe this is the piece I saw in Opera at 533. Link to 533 so you can check it out.

Carrying on from the last post about artists in various group shows:

Apologies to Brendan Threadgill. Having my memory refreshed by online images I see that in fact Threadgill doesn’t “make plaster casts” of bombed car parts – rather in one series of works he “refinishes (the mangled roof of a car used as a bomb) in strict accordance of automotive industry standards.” (quoting from Burgerworld Chronicles Photo Epicenter) One thing I notice in looking at these beautiful sculptures and photographs is Threadgill making use of  somewhat mechanical (for want of a better term) outside forces to achieve or enforce the lovely aesthetics he achieves. “Strict accordance of automotive standards” to which he also seems to include current art and historical fragment conservation standards of “fix nothing but stabilize.”

In a March 2008 interview on iheartphotograph.com with Nicholas Grider querying Threadgill I find him using a similarly hands off approach to beauty and abstraction: “…the aesthetics of the image, the colors, values, contrast, etc., are determined completely by the automated algorithm with no intervention or manipulation on my part.” Threadgill furthers this conversation noting that his examination of the physical, digital and technological processes that make photographs results in what we may see as “gestural abstractions” and in fact what we see (in the light boxes) is the act (process) of photography made clear in an image as well as a photograph of… something.

The light boxes at Turner seem in a similar vein.

I wonder about the need for a lack of agency here. Part of me wants to say, “Well yes, but you do make these things. You do make the choices. That’s what artists do.” And then (I think) I recognize that those thoughts of mine may not be addressing at all the questions being worked out by Threadgill (and others).

There’s a whole lot of beauty being made lately. Formal abstract qualities are being stressed, delicious images are made to flash by on a wall or are captured on photo paper, shiny objects are standing as evidence of ideas. I want to keep looking, and asking questions.

Now it’s Saturday am, we’re on our way out to do some looking – so expect more later as things develop and gel…

Feel free to share any thoughts you may have. Like you I want to learn.

There’s a comment tab here somewhere… (I think if you select to view only one post it appears magically from WordPress land)

Geoff Tuck

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