Notes on Looking, June 17, 2010

Staring cow, 2010. What do cows have to do with LA contemporary art? Nothing much. This particular cow is very cute and caught my eye in Parkfield. Better question might be why am I inflicting my fuzzy cow picture on your time? Um...

Staring cow, 2010. What do cows have to do with LA contemporary art? Nothing much. This particular cow is very cute and caught my eye in Parkfield. Better question might be why am I inflicting my fuzzy cow picture on your time? Um...

Hello friends and Fellows,

I’ll get to Notes in a moment but first I’m putting on my shameless hussy hat-of-self-promotion to announce that I’ve posted myself to the blogosphere: http://notesonlooking.com is ready and eager for your perusal! Yes, another place to find Notes on Looking and I’m hopeful a variety of diverse and equally fun things as the future unrolls. As you’ll find noted in the “About” page an entire ton of credit and thanks go to the Fellows of Contemporary Art who allow my voice to develop and flourish under their care. Another ton of happy thanks are devoted to Bettina Korek for welcoming me into her family of content producers at For Your Art and her cohort Jessica Simmons who fixes factual errors with consistency and charming lighthandedness. A third ton I want to mail to Daniel Lara who designed and set up my site. Not much changes except now I have my own home and a place to archive Notes under my own name. Wheeeee!

More in the vein of shameless self promotion! (Which vein was that Geoff?) X-TRA has posted its new issue to x-traonline.org (with several key omissions to maintain attractiveness for your increasingly mandatory purchase) and on that site you’ll find… 1 Image 1 Minute by Geoff Tuck! Also you’ll find essays by Benjamin Lord, Jan Tumlir, Kristina Newhouse, a companion 1 Image 1 Minute by Christopher Haun and an artist project by Alex Slade.

Back to Notes.

I feel a need to remind you of the Velaslavasay Panorama. Coming up on June 17 at 8 pm Æ and Nanuka Tchitchoua will present ‘stirring songs (and pictures, I think) from diverse traditions. Tchitchoua is a Georgian artist and Cal Arts grad and Æ (pronounced ash) are a pair of artists (Aurelia Shrenker and Eva Salina Primack) from Brooklyn. Diversity meets soul-stirring diversion at the Velaslavasay Panorama. Once again, I might add.

Another hot tip found on the VP website: Two dream films by Ohio experimental filmmaker Richard Myers on Saturday, June 26 at 8 pm. Myers himself will be present! Eek. Read a bit more about Myers here at Canyon Cinema.

I stand before you amazed! I looked up Velaslavasay to see what I could see and came across the interesting Georgian song and picture fest. Then I scrolled down and saw the Richard Myers news. Then I googled for a while and found Canyon Cinema. 1, 2, 3 bases are loaded and whack! he hits one home. Canyon Cinema is a fantastic thing to know about! Read the history, review the catalog of filmmakers. You can rent and buy films by artists such as Kenneth Anger, Wallace Berman, Pat O’Neill, and the list goes on!

Your new friends at Canyon also have thoughtfully curated programs one can rent or purchase. Perhaps a selection such as Not At Ease and Not At Rest curated by Eric Theise which promises “an evening of adolescent disquiet, geothermal and meteorological agitation, drastic measures, aural assault, California Dreamin’, and the discomfort that comes with the impossibility of fully understanding the other, at any age.” Films in this program are: Restless by Andrej Zdravic (1987), Thanatopsis by Ed Emshwiller (1962), Old Argument on Macdougal Street by James Irwin (1985), Filmpiece for Sunshine by Jason Luther Schofill (1966-1968), Wild Night in El Reno by George Kuchar (1977), Selective Service System by Warren Haack (1970), Miss Jesus Fries on Grill by Dorothy Wiley (1973) and George Dumpson’s Place by Ed Emshwiller (1965).

In each case above I’ve linked either to a Youtube or Ubuweb screening of the film or the Canyon Cinema description. Knock yourselves out with filmic amour!
Velaslavasay Panorama, 1122 West 24th Street, LA, 90007

Mark Bradford Potable Water, 2005   I grabbed this image from Beauty Call Blog, which is here-in linked and which is pretty cool if one is interested in fashion and things beautiful and inspiring. This painting does seem to be in the Wexner show but their site makes really tiny images and Mark deserves better than tiny!

Mark Bradford Potable Water, 2005 I grabbed this image from Beauty Call Blog, which is here-in linked and which is pretty cool if one is interested in fashion and things beautiful and inspiring. This painting does seem to be in the Wexner show but their site makes really tiny images and Mark deserves better than tiny!

Following my Ohio train of thought, this weekend I’m going to see Mark Bradford in the first major museum survey of his work.

That got your attention, didn’t it?! Amazing what a little name dropping can do. Bradford is the 2009 / 2010 recipient of the Wexner Center’s Residency Award and the Wexner Center’s Curator of Exhibitions, Christopher Bedford has organized You’re Nobody (Til Somebody Kills You), Bradford’s extensive solo exhibition. (Chris Bedford, he says casually – more is the relentless name dropping!)

Pardon this brief interjection from the peanut gallery: “CAN YOU IMAGINE THIS EXHIBITION IS NOT IN LOS ANGELES????????????????? NOT EVEN COMING HERE?! We have three major institutions claiming to represent contemporary art in town. Five when you count the other MOCA building and OCMA. Six if you count Broad! And the Getty is inching toward the mythic and extremely crowd-pleasing Bethlehem of contemporary art. So why is Bedford at the Wexner smarter than anybody out here? What kind of disarray obtains in the state of our citys culture?”

O. K., I’m done ranting. Be jealous or get thee to Columbus. More reasons to visit Ohio coming up!
Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St., Columbus, Ohio, 43210 May 8 through August 15, 2010

The more to see in Columbus is Wonderland. “Um, gee Geoff, I clicked and only found some text. What’s Wonderland?” “Glad you asked, partner!” Wonderland is an Art Space; Wonderland is a Performance Space; Wonderland is an Office Space for Creative Types; and Wonderland is Retail Space all packed into a former Wonder Bread factory just across the hwy from Peter Eisenmann’s Convention Center. Adaptive reuse anyone? This project, from dream to fact is entirely organized by creative people under thirty. In what those of us in LA and NY comfortably and somewhat dismissively refer to as “one of America’s second cities.”

Second to what, I wonder? In conversation with Jeanine Jablonski of Portland (another second city of recent note) and Andy Dodson of Columbus an idea has been presented to me that “In (my city) my peers are creative people from all trades and fields. There aren’t enough art galleries or musucians to each create separate communities of each, so we’re all involved in many scenes. With the kind of support and creative cross-connection (we) have going on why would I move to LA, NY, Chicago or another of the old line big cities? I/we can do more here and make our city the best it can be.” Not quite a quote from either Jablonski (the Director of Portland’s Fourteen30 Contemporary) or Dodson (the President at Central City Recording and a co-founder of Wonderland) but a close approximation of the feelings they each expressed at the completely different times I spoke with them.

Um, much of the above post would be inappropriate without the disclosure I get to do so often. Andy Dodson is my nephew – actually David’s nephew but since we live in a culture that maintains adherence as though it were universal to a 5,000 year old religious tradition that is demonstrably not universal I’ll say I call him my nephew. Andy, Ben Miller, Max Lewis and other of Andy’s friends I’ve been lucky to meet are as determined to change the(ir) world as anyone under thirty is. (And some over thirty too. Rock on agers!)

Just as in the world as a whole it’s been a long time since one could speak of a First World / Second World dichotomy (come to think of how on earth did that stupid stuff even get started?!) it is no longer possible to posit that LA or NY hold the keys to the US’s cultural cabinet of wonders.

All of this makes my heart sing.

You know what else? If only to establish that every proposition I argue destroys itself by profitably expanding in directions I never anticipate I want also alert you to new and unexpected wonders in our berg.

The very fine Fine Arts LA, where Josh Morrison is targeting an audience of under thirty year olds with culture that includes but doesn’t rely on established culture reminds me that youth as “another continent” is staking a persuasive claim to coexistence with what we think of as culture at large. I swear, I feel like Columbus (the discovery-guy) every day!

Mark Bradford Potable Water, 2005  I grabbed this image from Beauty Call Blog, which is here-in linked and which is pretty cool if one is interested in fashion and things beautiful and inspiring. This painting does seem to be in the Wexner show but their site makes really tiny images and Mark deserves better than tiny!  (In a curious move away from straight newsletter writing, here the author has used doubling and repetition - which have been common strategies in contemporary art for decades. Here we see it lifted from the familiar territory of work by such artists as Allan McCollum, Eva Hesse and Bradford himself and applied in this more unusual venue.)

Mark Bradford Potable Water, 2005 I grabbed this image from Beauty Call Blog, which is here-in linked and which is pretty cool if one is interested in fashion and things beautiful and inspiring. This painting does seem to be in the Wexner show but their site makes really tiny images and Mark deserves better than tiny! (In a curious move away from straight newsletter writing here the author has used doubling and repetition, which have been common strategies in contemporary art for decades. Here we see it lifted from the familiar territory of work by such artists as Allan McCollum, Eva Hesse and Bradford himself and applied in this more unusual venue.)

Onward from essentialising Ohio and youth to the promotion of conversation about creative communities as a growing phenomenon I tell you  that on June 24th at 8 pm at LACE a panel discussion on creating community and creative communities organized by Josh Morrison and including fascinating talkers Arely Villegas; Paolo Davanzo; Daniel Ingroff and Paul Pescador; Freddi Cerasoli; and Lee Rachel Foley. Moderator will be LACE’s Carol Stakenas and the event is hosted under the comfortable umbrella of the Hollywood Fringe Festival.

Did you notice it begins at 8? That same night the X-TRA Release Party at Human Resources on Bernard Street in Chinatown with Benjamin Lord in converstaion with Brandon LaBelle runs from 7:30 to 9:30 – although I sincerely hope it goes late since C-Town is a wretched drive from Hollywood Blvd. (Anywhere is a wretched drive from Hollywood Blvd. Always has been.) More news on Fine Arts LA panel next week.
LACE, 6522 Hollywood Blvd., LA, 90028
Human Resources, 510 Bernard Street, Chinatown, 90012

Totally cool stuff at Bernard St.!! Catherine Taft and Francois Ghebaly assist life in amping up my glee with the Bourgeois Problems exhibition Taft has curated for Ghebaly’s Bernard Street space. Nancy Buchanan, Nikhil Murthy, Jeff Ostergren, Margie Schnibbe and Schnibbe on Vimeo, too! Nikhil Murthy has shown in Welcome to Fake Iraq, an exhibition curated by the estimable Nicholas Grider at Angel’s Gate Cultural Center; Nancy Buchanan is a Feminist artist about whom you should know; Jeff Ostergren has his own pretty interesting and explanatory site; the first Margie Schnibbe link is to her own website and the second is to Vimeo with a trailer for Schnibbe’s naughty fight film “Teaparty!” which has Buffy and Mrs. Beasley conceived rather differently than one may be accustomed to and fighting like the bleach blonde, baby-dolled, oiled up tarts they really are. (Tempting description, huh guys?)

The Artists Formerly Known As Steven Bankhead and Chris Wilder have organized 12 sessions of music to fill the 12 hours btwn 10 am Saturday, June 20 to 10 pm Saturday, June 20 at Rudolph Schindler’s Buck House, hosted by Country Club Projects. (Wilder link is to a 1998 conversation on Ufology btwn Wilder and Mike Kelley – Bankhead link is to Mary Ann Pomonis review of his 2009 show at Circus.) Cut-and-past of artist list from Bankhead’s email below:

Schedule of Artists:
10:00 AM – Steven Bankhead
11:00 AM – Tony MacKenzie
12:00 PM – Hannah Greely & Elana Scherr
1:00 PM – Chris Wilder
2:00 PM – Alex Becerra
3:00 PM – Jason Yates
4:00 PM – Jan Tumlir
5:00 PM – Jonah Freeman & Justin Lowe
6:00 PM – Tom Norris
7:00 PM – T. Kelly Mason
8:00 PM – Steve Roden
9:00 PM – Thaddeus Strode

No, I didn’t get permission from Bankhead and Wilder to drape them with the Prince mantle but… they’re great, so is Prince and who can tell, maybe Saturday night someone’ll perform When Doves Cry! (Steve Roden, Destiny’s Child is calling you.)

About the Buck House: the garden patio and adjacent interior rooms of Schindler’s urban villa are some of the most beautiful spaces for experiencing music and art in our city. John Knuth as host always provides a perfect setting for sophisticated and cultured if occasionally raucous and randy merrymaking. One shouldn’t miss this party. A picnec of fried chicken and beverages will be available. I do hope some clever guest brings an ice bucket, cocktail shaker, and some chilled gin and Lillet. This elegant space asks for elegant cocktails! One part chilled Lillet to two parts equally chilled gin, stir vigorously with ice strain into a stemmed glass and enjoy!
Country Club Project at the Buck House, 805 S. Genesee Ave., LA, 90036

For three years we’ve waited. Positively spent with anticipation we are. 2nd Cannons Publications announced today the release of Forest by Brian Kennon. WOW! Authored to accompany Kennon’s 2007 exhibition Long Live Rock n Roll / Richard Hawkins Decapitated Head at Dan Hug Gallery, this three volume masterwork comnbines pictures of forests culled by Kennon from the Internet, a catalog of 7 digital images of Richard Hawkins’ famous Disembodied Zombies work and a book of 10 Agnes Martin drawings. Neat.

This priceless cultural artifact can now be yours for the astonishing low price of just $35! A special edition of 10 will be signed and numbered by the artist and hand wrapped in a Brian Kennon-and-2nd Cannons-Loves-You book cover.

Apologies for the hokum Brian. You know I have indeed been waiting for three years. Happy to do it, too. Amazing things you make!

After negotiating with Pay Pal to purchase a set of these books hightail it to Richard Telles Fine Art for the final weekend of Richard Hawkins solo exhibition. You are required to attend – afterall this is Hawkins’ first solo exhibition in LA since 2007. Next time we see him it’ll be at the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011. Hey – to gild this lilly even more I’ll tell you that the Art Institute exhibition will be accompanied by a major publication with essays by George Baker (he of UCLA), Lisa Dorin – exhibition curator, and Ali Subotnik – curator at the Hammer Museum. (Where I’m promised the show will travel. Soon, I hope!)
Richard Telles Fine Art, 7380 Beverly Blvd., :LA, 90036

Did I hear you ask what Richard’s opening on June 26? Yay! Signs of Life, organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando with work by Emilie Halperin, Lorna Macintyre, Kris Martin, Lisa Tan, and Greg Wilken. Totally exciting line up! You can bet I’ll fill you full of details about this show next week.

Until then I’ll be thinking of you while I’m in Ohio. Thanks for making it so hard for me to leave home and so easy to come back!

Much love,

Geoff Tuck

Brian Kennon, scan of pages three and four from Forest, 2007 - 2010 link to scan of cover of this first of the three books

Brian Kennon, scan of pages three and four from Forest, 2007 - 2010 link to scan of cover of this first of the three books

Brian Kennon, scan of pages seven and eight from Richard Hawkins, Disembodied Zombies, 1997,  2007 - 2010 link to the cover of this second of three volumes

Brian Kennon, scan of pages seven and eight from Richard Hawkins, Disembodied Zombies, 1997, 2007 - 2010 link to the cover of this second of three volumes

Brian Kennon, scan of pages nine and ten from Agnes Martin Untitled #1-10. 2007 - 2010 link to cover of this third of three volumes

Brian Kennon, scan of pages nine and ten from Agnes Martin Untitled #1-10. 2007 - 2010 link to cover of this third of three volumes

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