Notes on Looking, March 25, 2010

John Pearson, image for Sun Zoom Spark invitation, link to WPA

John Pearson, image for Sun Zoom Spark invitation, link to WPA

Dear friends and Fellows,

I think Mercury is transiting Saturn in my House of the Speeding Car Chase. Life is just whizzing by. I’ll take a short poke at it and then be off.

While visiting Paul Pescador’s window installation at Outpost last week I learned that I can listen to the sounds of space on a U of Iowa website. An indirect learning experience: some nice person thanked another person for giving her something I don’t recall and in return passed along the web address. Pescador copied that letter, along with dozens of others in his drawing. I ran home and listened and space sounds pretty much as you’d expect it to – crackly and kind of fun.

Tonight, Thursday at Sam Lee Gallery at the PDC Nathan Hayden opens for the walking purpose, a show that it turns out I’ve been waiting to see for a while, without knowing it. In December 2007 Hayden had a show at the Manhattan Beach Art Center that I visited, the work was new to me, Hayden had recently graduated from UC Santa Barbara and the thing that most remained in my mind is a conversation we had about a series of small, tiny even, impromptu drawings where Hayden made interestingly intuitive marks, drawings and cartoons on an odd variety of papers he had at hand while traveling and walking. These drawings illustrated for me how when we walk in a new terrain or city images jump out strangely to our eyes because we don’t have the context of familiarity and thoughts come to mind that make no obvious reference to what we’re seeing. If one could document such experiences, the marks one would make to attempt communication of this state might inspire in a viewer that same jolt of mis/un-recognition. The small drawings I saw in 2007 gave me a pleasant frisson of almost but not quite understanding. It’s been a couple of years, Hayden’s been working more and it seems he’s ready to present in a show a body of work related to those drawings I saw. Sam Lee at the PDC Blue Building Suite B267, 8687 Melrose Ave. WeHo 90069

I note that also opening at the PDC is a show of new video by Neha Choksi at Carl Berg. I can’t say anything beyond that but do remember seeing Choksi’s work at Carl’s previous gallery on Wilshire and I hated the idea of you driving all the way to West Hollywood to see only one show. I’m pretty sure there will be more at the same time I just don’t know. Sorry but the PDC befuddles me.

Nathan Hayden, drawing from upcoming PDC show. Link to Hayden's site.

Nathan Hayden, drawing from upcoming PDC show. Link to Hayden's site.

Pam Jorden has organized a pretty curious sounding exhibition called Sun Zoom Spark opening at WPA on Saturday. I’m excited! Julie Becker, Katy Crowe, Pam Jorden, Alice Könitz, Virginia Holt, and Terri Phillips each are participants – the work I know I pretty much love and I haven’t seen work by Becker since MOCA had a piece installed last year or the year before. (I’m also having a flashback of Joanie Gordon at Newspace in 1998 showing us some Polaroids Becker made. It’s a nice memory.) I briefly saw some paintings by Virginia Holt at Jancar a while back, I’m intrigued by her abstractions – Holt has been working longer than many of us have been alive and her confidence shows.

David Levine, Hopeful exhibition as it was installed at Galerie Feinkost in Berlin. Galerie Feinkost linked here.

David Levine, Hopeful exhibition as it was installed at Galerie Feinkost in Berlin. Galerie Feinkost linked here.

While you’re in the hood, Francois Ghebaly Gallery has a show by David Levine that opened last weekend. I think I should know more about who David Levine is and well, here’s my chance. (pretend time passes while I’m busy googling and reading) Here’s a link to a pretty full interview of Levine by Alix Rule on Saatchi Online and another that is more indepth about his directing in (my favorite and yours) Bomb Magazine. Levine is also a founder of CiNE, which is a film collective with a really fun website! Interesting projects, too some of which are excerpted on the site. This is all new to me – I read three interviews, watched a few videos and now I know – as they say – enough to be dangerous. Come be dangerous with me! See the shows at WPA and Ghebaly, 510 Bernard Street, 90012. Where Bernard Street, the 110, Hill Street, and a beautiful vegetable garden collide in Chinatown.

Um, things are quietish in Chinatown. (Maybe too quiet?)

Image from project Glück Auf/Luck Up in Essen Germany, collaborators: Daniel Hofer, Jean-Baptiste Mognetti, Valerie Schmidt, Matthew Siegle, Lennart Selle, Lily Whitsitt. Coal mine shaft recreated from discarded Ikea boxes. Did you notice the canaries? link to Siegle's site

Image from project Glück Auf/Luck Up in Essen Germany, collaborators: Daniel Hofer, Jean-Baptiste Mognetti, Valerie Schmidt, Matthew Siegle, Lennart Selle, Lily Whitsitt. Coal mine shaft recreated from discarded Ikea boxes. Did you notice the canaries? link to Siegle's site

Lisa Flying, a photo not by (I think) but of Lisa Ohlweiler, possibly made by Evan Walsh and (this I know) borrowed from Evan's blog, which is here linked.

Lisa Flying, a photo not by (I think) but of Lisa Ohlweiler, possibly made by Evan Walsh and (this I know) borrowed from Evan's blog, which is here linked.

Erica Redling opened a group show curated by Matthew Siegle last week with work by Jesse Aron Green (cool – under Photographic Series Jesse has a photo that works like a flip book!), Nicholas Grider (who had a memorable show at Sea and Space I read about on (Michael Buitrón’s excellent but discontinued blog) Leap into the Void), RJ Messineo (if you’re paying attention you’ll recall Messineo’s work in Steve Turner’s show Wet Paint last summer), Lisa Ohlweiler, and Clarissa Tossin. I wanted to go to the opening, Jesse was in StoneFace at FOCA. Oh – and also in this year’s Whitney Biennial. Congrats Jesse! As you know, when I’m ignorant I link. After looking at all the pages I just viewed I really want to see this show! Completely check it out.

Paul Pescador, Leaving Meal (Crenshaw and Washington, Los Angles, CA), 2009 link to Pescador's site.

Paul Pescador, Leaving Meal (Crenshaw and Washington, Los Angles, CA), 2009 link to Pescador's site.

You know my friends, the art world – our world, is many things: intellectually challenging, aesthetically diverse, conceptually rigorous and… family. It’s a small world and many of us cross connect somehow. In that spirit join me in wishing a happy 75th Birthday to Michael Gold, who on the date in question received a phone call from his mother. (Who at 103 remembered her son’s birthday. Can you imagine?) Michael – here’s to 75 more great years of looking, collecting, curating, entertaining all of us and loving Sirje. Cheers to you Michael!

I include this rather personal birthday wish in context with Paul Pescador’s photograph (above) because Pescador’s image speaks to me of family, sharing, generosity and the simple goodness available to us all. Check out Pescador’s site for more od his work and projects. To me his way of approaching art practice is at (one of) the most interesting cutting edges of contemporary art.

n that note my friends, I say good night. Next week there’s a lot coming up and if I missed anything you think I need to see tell me about it! I’m always happy to learn more.

Great and good things to you all,

Geoff Tuck

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *